United States Senate elections, 2018

Elections to the United States Senate will be held November 6, 2018, with 33 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested in regular elections and two seats being contested in special elections. The winners will serve six-year terms from January 3, 2019, to January 3, 2025. Currently, Democrats have 24 seats up for election, as well as the seats of two independents who caucus with them. Republicans have nine seats up for election. The seats up for regular election in 2018 were last up for election in 2012; in addition, special elections will be scheduled if vacancies occur, as has already happened in Minnesota and Mississippi. After the 2016 elections, some state election officials are trying to upgrade voting systems in time for this election.[1]

The U.S. House of Representatives elections, 39 gubernatorial elections, and many other state and local elections will also be held on this date.

Republicans can only afford to lose one Senate seat and still have a working majority with the Vice President breaking the tie in their favor. Four of the Republican seats are open as a result of retirements in Tennessee, Utah, Arizona, and Mississippi. Democrats are defending ten seats in states won by Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election, while Republicans are only defending one seat in a state won by Hillary Clinton in 2016.

United States Senate elections, 2018

November 6, 2018

Class 1 (33 of the 100) seats in the United States Senate
(and 2 special elections)

51 seats needed for a majority
  Mitch McConnell close-up Chuck Schumer official photo (cropped)
Leader Mitch McConnell Chuck Schumer
Party Republican Democratic
Leader since January 3, 2007 January 3, 2017
Leader's seat Kentucky New York
Current seats 51 47
Seats needed Steady Increase 2
Seats up 9[a] 24[b]

 
Party Independent
Current seats 2
Seats up 2

United States Senate election in Arizona, 2018 United States Senate election in California, 2018 United States Senate election in Connecticut, 2018 United States Senate election in Delaware, 2018 United States Senate election in Florida, 2018 United States Senate election in Hawaii, 2018 United States Senate election in Indiana, 2018 United States Senate election in Maine, 2018 United States Senate election in Maryland, 2018 United States Senate election in Massachusetts, 2018 United States Senate election in Michigan, 2018 United States Senate election in Minnesota, 2018 United States Senate election in Mississippi, 2018 United States Senate election in Missouri, 2018 United States Senate election in Montana, 2018 United States Senate election in Nebraska, 2018 United States Senate election in Nevada, 2018 United States Senate election in New Jersey, 2018 United States Senate election in New Mexico, 2018 United States Senate election in New York, 2018 United States Senate election in North Dakota, 2018 United States Senate election in Ohio, 2018 United States Senate election in Pennsylvania, 2018 United States Senate election in Rhode Island, 2018 United States Senate election in Tennessee, 2018 United States Senate election in Texas, 2018 United States Senate election in Utah, 2018 United States Senate election in Vermont, 2018 United States Senate election in Virginia, 2018 United States Senate election in West Virginia, 2018 United States Senate election in Wyoming, 2018 United States Senate election in Washington, 2018 United States Senate election in Wisconsin, 2018United States Senate elections, 2018 with specials.svg
Seats up for election (general & special):
     Democratic incumbent running      Democratic incumbent retiring
     Republican incumbent running      Republican incumbent retiring
     Independent incumbent running      Independent incumbent retiring
     No election
Inset rectangle signifies a special election.

Incumbent Majority Leader

Mitch McConnell
Republican



Focus on competitive races

Democrats are expected to target the Republican-held Senate seats in Arizona (open seat) and Nevada.[2] Democrats could also target seats in Texas,[3] Mississippi (at least one of the two seats) and Tennessee's open-seat.[4] Republicans are expected to target Democratic-held seats in Indiana, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, and West Virginia, all of which voted for Mitt Romney in the 2012 presidential election and Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election,[5] as well as seats in Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Michigan, all of which voted for Donald Trump in the 2016 election.[6] Republicans could also target seats in Minnesota (at least one of the two seats), Virginia, Maine, and New Jersey.[2] Other races may also become competitive closer to election day.

Partisan composition

Among the 33 Class 1 Senate seats up for regular election in 2018 are 23 currently held by Democrats, two by independents who caucus with the Senate Democrats, and eight by Republicans. The Class 2 seats in Minnesota and Mississippi held by interim appointees are also up for election; both incumbent appointees are running in their elections to finish the unexpired terms.

Parties Total
Democratic Republican Independent
Last election (2016) 46 52 2 100
Before this election 47 51 2 100
Not up 23 42 0 65
Class 2 (20142020) 11 20 0 31
Class 3 (20162022) 12 22 0 34
Up 24 9 2 35
Class 1 (2012→2018) 23 8 2 33
Special: Class 2 1 1 0 2
Incumbent retiring 0 3 0 3
Incumbent running 24 6 2 32

Change in composition

Before the elections

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24
Running
D25
Running
D26
Running
D27
Running
D28
Running
D29
Running
D30
Running
D40
Running
D39
Running
D38
Running
D37
Running
D36
Running
D35
Running
D34
Running
D33
Running
D32
Running
D31
Running
D41
Running
D42
Running
D43
Running
D44
Running
D45
Running
D46
Running
D47
Running
I1
Running
I2
Running
R51
Retiring
Majority → R50
Retiring
R41 R42 R43
Running
R44
Running
R45
Running
R46
Running
R47
Running
R48
Running
R49
Retiring
R40 R39 R38 R37 R36 R35 R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the elections

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
Majority →
TBD
R41 R42 TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
R40 R39 R38 R37 R36 R35 R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key:
D# Democratic
R# Republican
I# Independent, caucusing with Democrats[7][8]

Most recent election predictions

Most election predictors use:

  • "tossup": no advantage
  • "tilt" (used sometimes): advantage that is not quite as strong as "lean"
  • "lean": slight advantage
  • "likely" or "favored": significant, but surmountable, advantage
  • "safe" or "solid": near-certain chance of victory
State PVI[9] Incumbent Most
recent
result
Cook
Apr 9,
2018
[10]
I.E.
Apr 20,
2018
[11]
Sabato
June 13,
2018
[12]
NYT
June 11,
2018
[13]
CNN
June 11,
2018
[14]
RCP
June 14,
2018
[15]
Fox News
June 12,
2018
[16]
Daily Kos
June 14,
2018
[17]
Arizona R+5 Jeff Flake (R)
(Retiring)
49% R Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup
California D+12 Dianne Feinstein (D) 63% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D
Connecticut D+6 Chris Murphy (D) 55% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D
Delaware D+6 Tom Carper (D) 66% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D
Florida R+2 Bill Nelson (D) 55% D Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup
Hawaii D+18 Mazie Hirono (D) 63% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D
Indiana R+9 Joe Donnelly (D) 50% D Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup
Maine D+3 Angus King (I) 53% I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Likely D/I Safe D/I Likely D/I Safe D/I
Maryland D+12 Ben Cardin (D) 55% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D
Massachusetts D+12 Elizabeth Warren (D) 54% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D
Michigan D+1 Debbie Stabenow (D) 59% D Likely D Safe D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D
Minnesota D+1 Amy Klobuchar (D) 65% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D
Minnesota
(Special)
D+1 Tina Smith (D) 53% D Lean D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D
Mississippi R+9 Roger Wicker (R) 57% R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Likely R Safe R
Mississippi
(Special)
R+9 Cindy Hyde-Smith (R) 60% R Likely R Safe R Likely R Likely R Safe R Likely R Likely R Likely R
Missouri R+9 Claire McCaskill (D) 55% D Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup
Montana R+11 Jon Tester (D) 49% D Likely D Tilt D Lean D Lean D Lean D Lean D Tossup Tossup
Nebraska R+14 Deb Fischer (R) 56% R Likely R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Likely R Safe R
Nevada D+1 Dean Heller (R) 46% R Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Lean D (flip) Tossup
New Jersey D+7 Bob Menendez (D) 59% D Likely D Safe D Likely D Likely D Safe D Likely D Likely D Likely D
New Mexico D+3 Martin Heinrich (D) 51% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D
New York D+11 Kirsten Gillibrand (D) 72% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D
North Dakota R+16 Heidi Heitkamp (D) 50% D Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup
Ohio R+3 Sherrod Brown (D) 51% D Lean D Lean D Likely D Lean D Lean D Likely D Lean D Lean D
Pennsylvania EVEN Bob Casey Jr. (D) 54% D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D
Rhode Island D+10 Sheldon Whitehouse (D) 64% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D
Tennessee R+14 Bob Corker (R)
(Retiring)
65% R Tossup Lean R Lean R Lean R Lean R Tossup Tossup Likely R
Texas R+8 Ted Cruz (R) 57% R Likely R Likely R Likely R Likely R Likely R Lean R Lean R Likely R
Utah R+20 Orrin Hatch (R)
(Retiring)
65% R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Likely R Safe R
Vermont D+15 Bernie Sanders (I) 71% I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Likely D/I Safe D/I
Virginia D+1 Tim Kaine (D) 53% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Likely D Likely D Safe D
Washington D+7 Maria Cantwell (D) 61% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D
West Virginia R+20 Joe Manchin (D) 61% D Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup
Wisconsin EVEN Tammy Baldwin (D) 51% D Likely D Tilt D Lean D Lean D Lean D Likely D Likely D Lean D
Wyoming R+25 John Barrasso (R) 76% R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Likely R Safe R

Election dates

For the regularly scheduled general elections. Shading added for future events.

State Filing
deadline[18]
Primary
election[19]
Primary
runoff
(if necessary)[19]
General
election
Poll closing
(Eastern Time)[20]
Arizona May 30, 2018 August 28, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm
California March 9, 2018 June 5, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 11pm
Connecticut June 12, 2018 August 14, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Delaware July 10, 2018 September 6, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Florida May 4, 2018 August 28, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 7pm & 8pm
Hawaii June 5, 2018 August 11, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 11pm
Indiana February 9, 2018 May 8, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 6pm & 7pm
Maine March 15, 2018 June 12, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Maryland February 27, 2018 June 26, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Massachusetts June 5, 2018 September 4, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Michigan April 24, 2018 August 7, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm & 9pm
Minnesota June 5, 2018 August 14, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm
Mississippi March 1, 2018 June 5, 2018 June 26, 2018 November 6, 2018 8pm
Mississippi (Special) March 26, 2018 November 6, 2018 N/A November 27, 2018[c] 8pm
Missouri March 27, 2018 August 7, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Montana March 12, 2018 June 5, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 10pm
Nebraska March 1, 2018 May 15, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm
Nevada March 16, 2018 June 12, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 10pm
New Jersey April 2, 2018 June 5, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
New Mexico March 13, 2018 June 5, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm
New York April 12, 2018 June 26, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm
North Dakota April 9, 2018 June 12, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 10pm & 11pm
Ohio February 7, 2018 May 8, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 7:30pm
Pennsylvania March 20, 2018 May 15, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Rhode Island June 27, 2018 September 12, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Tennessee April 5, 2018 August 2, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Texas December 11, 2017 March 6, 2018 May 22, 2018
(Unnecessary)
November 6, 2018 8pm & 9pm
Utah March 15, 2018 June 26, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 10pm
Vermont May 31, 2018 August 14, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 7pm
Virginia March 29, 2018 June 12, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 7pm
Washington May 18, 2018 August 7, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 11pm
West Virginia January 27, 2018 May 8, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 7:30pm
Wisconsin June 1, 2018 August 14, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm
Wyoming June 1, 2018 August 21, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm

Race summary

Special elections during the preceding Congress

In these special elections, the winners will be elected coincidingly with the other races of the 2018 Senate elections, but will be seated before January 3, 2019. Ordered by election date, then by state, then by class.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral
history
Minnesota
(Class 2)
Tina Smith Democratic 2018 (Appointed) Special election scheduled for November 6, 2018.
Interim appointee running.
Ali Chehem Ali (Democratic)[21]
Bob Anderson (Republican)[21]
Nikolay Bey (Republican)[21]
Karin Housley (Republican)[21]
Gregg Iverson (Democratic)[21]
Nick Leonard (Democratic)[21]
Richard Painter (Democratic)[21]
Christopher Seymore (Democratic)[21]
Tina Smith (Democratic)[21]
Mississippi
(Class 2)
Cindy Hyde-Smith Republican 2018 (Appointed) Special election scheduled for November 6, 2018.
If no candidate receives a majority, a runoff will be held on November 27, 2018.
Interim appointee running.
Tobey Bartee (Democratic)[22]
Mike Espy (Democratic)[22]
Cindy Hyde-Smith (Republican)[22]
Chris McDaniel (Republican)[22]

Elections leading to the next Congress

In these general elections, the winners will be elected for the term beginning January 3, 2019.

All of the elections involve the Class 1 seats; ordered by state.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Arizona Jeff Flake Republican 2012 Incumbent retiring.
New senator to be elected.
Deedra Abboud (Democratic)[23]
Eve Reyes Aguirre (Green)[23]
Joe Arpaio (Republican)[23]
Doug Marks (Libertarian)[23]
Martha McSally (Republican)[23]
Kyrsten Sinema (Democratic)[23]
Kelli Ward (Republican)[23]
California Dianne Feinstein Democratic 1992 (Special)
1994
2000
2006
2012
Incumbent renominated. Kevin de León (Democratic)[24]
Dianne Feinstein (Democratic)[24]
Connecticut Chris Murphy Democratic 2012 Incumbent running.[25] Ann-Marie Adams (Democratic)[26]
Matthew Corey (Republican)[27]
Chris Murphy (Democratic)[25]
Dominic Rapini (Republican)[28]
Delaware Tom Carper Democratic 2000
2006
2012
Incumbent running.[29] Robert Arlett (Republican)[30]
Tom Carper (Democratic)[29]
Kerri Evelyn Harris (Democratic)[31]
Gene Truono (Republican)
Florida Bill Nelson Democratic 2000
2006
2012
Incumbent running. Rocky De La Fuente (Republican)[32]
Lateresa Ann Jones (Write-in)[32]
Howard Knepper (Write-in)[32]
Michael Levinson (Write-in)[32]
Bill Nelson (Democratic)[32]
Rick Scott (Republican)[32]
Charles Frederick Tolbert (Write-in)[32]
David Weeks (Write-in)[32]
Hawaii Mazie Hirono Democratic 2012 Incumbent running. Consuelo Anderson (Republican)[33]
Ronald Curtis (Republican)[33]
Charles Haverty (Nonpartisan)[33]
Robert Helsham (Republican)[33]
Mazie Hirono (Democratic)[33]
Michael Hodgkiss (Republican)[33]
Arturo Reyes (Nonpartisan)[33]
Thomas White (Republican)[33]
Indiana Joe Donnelly Democratic 2012 Incumbent renominated. Lucy Brenton (Libertarian)[34]
Mike Braun (Republican)[34]
Joe Donnelly (Democratic)[34]
Maine Angus King Independent 2012 Incumbent renominated. Eric Brakey (Republican)[35]
Angus King (Independent)[36]
Zak Ringelstein (Democratic)[35]
Maryland Ben Cardin Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent running. Tony Campbell (Republican)[37]
Ben Cardin (Democratic)[37]
Chris Chaffee (Republican)[37]
Evan Cronhardt (Republican)[37]
Nnabu Eze (Republican)[37]
John Graziani (Republican)[37]
Christina Grigorian (Republican)[37]
Albert Howard (Republican)[37]
Erik Jetmir (Democratic)[37]
Bill Krehnbrink (Republican)[37]
Chelsea Manning (Democratic)[37]
Marcia Morgan (Democratic)[37]
Jerry Segal (Democratic)[37]
Neal Simon (Independent)[38]
Edward Shlikas (Independent)[39]
Gerald Smith (Republican)[37]
Blaine Taylor (Republican)[37]
Brian Charles Vaeth (Republican)[37]
Rikki Vaughn (Democratic)[37]
Arvin Vohra (Libertarian)[37]
Rica Wilson (Democratic)[37]
Lih Young (Democratic)[37]
Massachusetts Elizabeth Warren Democratic 2012 Incumbent running. Shiva Ayyadurai (Independent)[40]
Geoff Diehl (Republican)[41]
John Kingston (Republican)[41]
Beth Lindstrom (Republican)[41]
Elizabeth Warren (Democratic)[42]
Michigan Debbie Stabenow Democratic 2000
2006
2012
Incumbent running. John James (Republican)[43]
Sandy Pensler (Republican)[43]
Marcia Squier (Independent)[44][45]
Debbie Stabenow (Democratic)[43]
Minnesota Amy Klobuchar Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent running. Merrill Anderson(Republican)[21]
Rae Hart Anderson (Republican)[21]
Steve Carlson (Democratic)[21]
Stephen Emery (Democratic)[21]
David Groves (Democratic)[21]
Amy Klobuchar (Democratic)[21]
Jim Newberger (Republican)[21]
Leonard Richards (Democratic)[21]
Mississippi Roger Wicker Republican 2007 (Appointed)
2008 (Special)
2012
Incumbent renominated. David Baria (Democratic)[22]
Danny Bedwell (Libertarian)[22]
Shawn O'Hara (Reform)[22]
Howard Sherman (Democratic)[22]
Roger Wicker (Republican)[22]
Missouri Claire McCaskill Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent running. Jerome Bauer (Green)[46]
Japheth Campbell (Libertarian)[46]
Jo Crain (Green)[46]
Angelica Earl (Democratic)[46]
David Faust (Democratic)[46]
Travis Gonzalez (Democratic)[46]
Brian Hagg (Republican)[46]
Josh Hawley (Republican)[46]
John Hogan (Democratic)[46]
Bradley Krembs (Republican)[46]
Claire McCaskill (Democratic)[46]
Tony Monetti (Republican)[46]
Kristi Nichols (Republican)[46]
Ken Patterson (Republican)[46]
Austin Petersen (Republican)[46]
Peter Pfeifer (Republican)[46]
Fred Ryman (Republican)[46]
Christina Smith (Republican)[46]
Courtland Sykes (Republican)[46]
Leonard Steinman (Democratic)[46]
Carla Wright (Democratic)[46]
Montana Jon Tester Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent renominated. Rick Breckenridge (Libertarian)[47]
Matthew Rosendale (Republican)[47]
Jon Tester (Democratic)[47]
Nebraska Deb Fischer Republican 2012 Incumbent renominated. Deb Fischer (Republican)[48]
Jane Raybould (Democratic)[48]
Jim Schultz (Libertarian)[48]
Nevada Dean Heller Republican 2011 (Appointed)
2012
Incumbent renominated. Kamau Bakari (Independent American)[49]
Tim Hagan (Libertarian)[49]
Dean Heller (Republican)[49]
Barry Michaels (Independent)[49]
Jacky Rosen (Democratic)[49]
New Jersey Bob Menendez Democratic 2006 (Appointed)
2006
2012
Incumbent renominated. Bob Hugin (Republican)[50]
Bob Menendez (Democratic)[50]
New Mexico Martin Heinrich Democratic 2012 Incumbent renominated. Aubrey Dunn Jr. (Libertarian)[51]
Martin Heinrich (Democratic)[51]
Mick Rich (Republican)[51]
New York Kirsten Gillibrand Democratic 2009 (Appointed)
2010 (Special)
2012
Incumbent running. Chele Chiavacci Farley (Republican)[52]
Kirsten Gillibrand (Democratic)[52]
Scott Noren (Democratic)[52]
North Dakota Heidi Heitkamp Democratic 2012 Incumbent renominated. Kevin Cramer (Republican)[53]
Heidi Heitkamp (Democratic)[53]
Ohio Sherrod Brown Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent renominated. Sherrod Brown (Democratic)[54]
Philena Irene Farley (Green, write-in)[55]
Jim Renacci (Republican)[54]
Pennsylvania Bob Casey Jr. Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent renominated. Lou Barletta (Republican)[56]
Bob Casey Jr. (Democratic)[56]
Rhode Island Sheldon Whitehouse Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent running.[57] Robert Flanders (Republican)[58]
Robert Nardolillo (Republican)[59]
Sheldon Whitehouse (Democratic)[57]
Tennessee Bob Corker Republican 2006
2012
Incumbent retiring.
New senator to be elected.
David Anderson (Republican)[60]
Trudy Austin (Independent)[60]
Phil Bredesen (Democratic)[60]
Marsha Blackburn (Republican)[60]
John Carico (Independent)[60]
Larry Crim (Republican)[60]
Gary Davis (Democratic)[60]
"Mr. Jim" Elkins (Republican)[60]
Tommy Hay (Republican)[60]
Terri Honeycutt (Republican)[60]
Dean Hill (Independent)[60]
J. Darrell Lynn (Republican)[60]
Kevin McCants (Independent)[60]
Aaron Pettigrew (Republican)[60]
Breton Philips (Independent)[60]
Kris Todd (Independent)[60]
Rolando Toyos (Republican)[60]
John Wolfe (Democratic)[60]
Texas Ted Cruz Republican 2012 Incumbent renominated. Carl Bible (Independent)[61]
Ted Cruz (Republican)[62]
Neal Dikeman (Libertarian)[63][64]
Bob McNeil (Independent)[d][66]
Beto O'Rourke (Democratic)[67]
Utah Orrin Hatch Republican 1976
1982
1988
1994
2000
2006
2012
Incumbent retiring.
New senator to be elected.
Tim Aalders (Constitution)[68]
Craig Bowden (Libertarian)[68]
Ryan Daniel Jackson (Write-in)[68]
Mike Kennedy (Republican)[68]
Abe Korb (Write-in)[68]
Reed McCandless (Independent American)[68]
Caleb Dan Reeve (Write-in)[68]
Mitt Romney (Republican)[68]
Jenny Wilson (Democratic)[68]
Vermont Bernie Sanders Independent 2006
2012
Incumbent running. Folasade Adeluola (Democratic)[69]
Brooke Paige (Republican)[69]
Jasdeep Pannu (Republican)[69]
Bernie Sanders (Democratic)[69]
Lawrence Zupan (Republican)[69]
Virginia Tim Kaine Democratic 2012 Incumbent renominated. Tim Kaine (Democratic)[70]
Corey Stewart (Republican)[70]
Matt Waters (Libertarian)[71]
Washington Maria Cantwell Democratic 2000
2006
2012
Incumbent running. Thor Amundson (Independent)[72]
Dave Bryant (Republican)[72]
Jon Butler (Independent)[72]
Maria Cantwell (Democratic)[72]
Brad Chase (FDFR)[72]
Art Coday (Republican)[72]
Jimmie Deal (Green)[72]
Rocky De La Fuente (Republican)[72]
Jennifer Ferguson (Democratic)[72]
Joey Gibson (Republican)[72]
Matt Hawkins (Republican)[72]
Matthew Heines (Republican)[72]
Steve Hoffman (FreedomSocialist)[72]
Susan Hutchison (Republican)[72]
Charlie Jackson (Independent)[72]
George Kalberer (Democratic)[72]
Mike Luke (Libertarian)[72]
John Orlinski (Republican)[72]
Tim Owen (Republican)[72]
Don Rivers (Democratic)[72]
Mohammad Said (Democratic)[72]
RC Smith (Republican)[72]
Glen Stockwell (Republican)[72]
Dave Strider (Independent)[72]
Keith Swank (Republican)[72]
Clint Tannehill (Democratic)[72]
Alex Tsimerman (StandupAmerica)[72]
Sam Wright (The Human Rights)[72]
West Virginia Joe Manchin Democratic 2010 (Special)
2012
Incumbent renominated. Joe Manchin (Democratic)[73]
Patrick Morrisey (Republican)[73]
Wisconsin Tammy Baldwin Democratic 2012 Incumbent renominated. Tammy Baldwin (Democratic)[74]
Charles Barman (Republican)[74]
George Lucia (Republican)[74]
Griffin Jones (Republican)[74]
Kevin Nicholson (Republican)[74]
Leah Vukmir (Republican)[74]
Wyoming John Barrasso Republican 2007 (Appointed)
2008 (Special)
2012
Incumbent running. John Barrasso (Republican)[75]
Dave Dodson (Independent)[75]
Charlie Hardy (Republican)[75]
John Holtz (Republican)[75]
Anthony Risseghem (Republican)[75]
Gary Trauner (Democratic)[75]

Arizona

One-term Republican Jeff Flake was elected with 49% of the vote in 2012. He has declared he will retire at the end of his term.[76]

U.S. Representative Martha McSally,[23] former state senator Kelli Ward,[23] and former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio,[23] are running contest the Republican primary.

U.S. Rep. Kyrsten Sinema[23] and Deedra Abboud[23] are running for the Democratic nomination.

Eve Reyes Aguirre is running as a Green Party Candidate.[23]

California

California election

  Dianne Feinstein, official Senate photo 2 KDL-Portrait
Nominee Dianne Feinstein Kevin de León
Party Democratic Democratic

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Dianne Feinstein
Democratic



Four-term Democrat Dianne Feinstein won a special election in 1992 and was elected to full terms in 1994, 2000, 2006, and 2012. She is running for re-election and will advance to the general election after securing the top spot in the June 5 primary.[24]

President pro tempore of the California State Senate Kevin de León will advance to the general election after securing the second spot in the June 5 primary.[24] Other Democratic candidates included community advocate Adrienne Nicole Edwards,[24] Eugene Patterson Harris,[24] David Hildebrand, Douglas Howard Pierce,[24] and Alison Hartson.[24]

Republican candidates included Paul Allen Taylor.[24]

Derrick Michael Reid ran with the Libertarian Party.[24]

Independent candidates included biologist Tim Gildersleeve,[24] Lee W. Olson,[24] and evangelist Ling Ling Shi.[24]

Connecticut

One-term Democrat Chris Murphy was elected with 55% of the vote in 2012. He is running for re-election.[25] He is being challenged for the Democratic nomination by Ann-Marie Adams.[26]

Businessmen Matthew Corey[27] and Dominic Rapini[28] are seeking the Republican nomination.

Delaware

Three-term Democrat Tom Carper won re-election with 66% of the vote in 2012. He announced he was running for re-election during an interview on MSNBC on July 24, 2017.[29] He will be challenged by Kerri Evelyn Harris for the Democratic nomination.

Sussex County Councilman Robert Arlett and Businessman Gene Truono are running for the Republican nomination.

Florida

Three-term Democrat Bill Nelson was re-elected with 55% of the vote in 2012. He will seek re-election to a fourth term in office.[32]

Florida Governor Rick Scott has announced his candidacy for the Republican nomination. First elected in 2010 and re-elected in 2014, Scott's term as Governor of Florida is set to end by January 2019, due to term limits.[32] Lateresa Ann Jones,[32] Howard Knepper,[32] and Joe Smith,[32] are also running for the Republican nomination.

Edward Janowski is running as independents.[32]

Hawaii

One-term Democrat Mazie Hirono was elected with 63% of the vote in 2012. She is running.[33]

Republican Thomas Edward White is running.[33]

Indiana

Indiana election

  Joe Donnelly, official portrait, 113th Congress No image
Nominee Joe Donnelly Mike Braun
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Joe Donnelly
Democratic



One-term Democrat Joe Donnelly was elected with 50.04% of the vote in 2012. He is running. He won the Democratic primary unopposed.[34]

State Representative Mike Braun[34] won the May 8 Republican primary. Congressmen Luke Messer[77] and Todd Rokita[77] also ran for the Republican nomination.

James Johnson is running as an independent.[34]

Maine

Maine election

  Angus King, official portrait, 113th Congress Eric Brakey by Gage Skidmore Zak Ringelstein
Nominee Angus King Eric Brakey Zak Ringelstein
Party Independent Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Angus King
Independent



One-term Independent Senator Angus King was elected in a three-way race with 53% of the vote in 2012. King has caucused with the Democratic Party since taking office in 2013, but he has left open the possibility of caucusing with the Republican Party in the future.[78]

King is running.[36]

State Senator Eric Brakey ran unopposed for the Republican nomination.[35]

Public school teacher and founder of UClass Zak Ringelstein ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[35]

Maryland

Two-term Democrat Ben Cardin was re-elected with 56% of the vote in 2012. He is running,[37] He is being challenged in the Democratic primary by Chelsea Manning,[37] Marcia Morgan, Jerry Segal, Richard "Rikki" Vaughn, Debbie "Rica" Wilson, and Lih Young.[37]

Tony Campbell, Evan Cronhardt, Nnabu Eze, Gerald Smith, and Blaine Taylor[37] are seeking the Republican nomination.

Arvin Vohra, vice chairman of the Libertarian National Committee, is seeking the Libertarian Party nomination.[37]

Independents Neal Simon[38] and Edward Shlikas[39] are running.

Massachusetts

One-term Democrat Elizabeth Warren was elected with 54% of the vote in 2012. She is running.[42]

State Representative Geoff Diehl,[41] attorney and founder of Better for America, John Kingston,[41] former Romney aide Beth Lindstrom,[41] are running for the Republican nomination.

Shiva Ayyadurai[40] is running as an independent. Shiva started as in early 2017 as the first Republican in the race but went independent in November 2017.

Michigan

Three-term Democrat Debbie Stabenow was re-elected with 59% of the vote in 2012. [43] She is the only Democrat from the state of Michigan running for Senate.

On the Republican side, businessman John James,[43] and businessman Sandy Pensler[43] are running.

Independent candidate Marcia Squier is also running. Marcia Squier ran as a Green Party candidate for District 14 of the U.S. House of Representatives in 2016.[79]

Minnesota

Two-term Democrat Amy Klobuchar was re-elected with 65% of the vote in 2012. She is running.[21]

State Representative Jim Newberger[21] is running for the Republican nomination.

Minnesota (Special)

Two-term Democrat Al Franken announced that he would resign in December 2017, following allegations of sexual harassment. Mark Dayton, Governor of Minnesota, appointed Lt. Gov. Tina Smith on January 2, 2018, as an interim Senator until the November 2018 election.[80]

Democratic incumbent Tina Smith,[21] Nick Leonard,[21] Republican Karin Housley,[21] and Republican Bob Anderson are running.[21]

Mississippi

Mississippi election

  SenatorRogerWicker(R-MS) No image
Nominee Roger Wicker TBD
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Roger Wicker
Republican



One-term Republican Roger Wicker won re-election with 57% of the vote in 2012. He was appointed in 2007 and won a special election in 2008 to serve the remainder of Trent Lott's term. He is running.[22]

David Baria[22] and Howard Sherman[22] are seeking the Democratic nomination. Neither won a majority in the June 5 primary and both will compete in a runoff on June 26.

Mississippi (Special)

Seven-term Republican Thad Cochran, who won re-election with 59.9% of the vote in 2014, announced that he would resign April 1, 2018 due to health reasons.[81] Phil Bryant, Governor of Mississippi, announced on March 21, 2018, that he would appoint Mississippi Agriculture Commissioner Cindy Hyde-Smith to fill the vacancy. She will be running in the special election.[22]

Former United States Secretary of Agriculture and member of the U.S. House of Representatives Mike Espy[22] and Toby Bartee[82] are running as Democratic candidates. Republican Chris McDaniel is also running.[22]

Missouri

Two-term Democrat Claire McCaskill was re-elected with 55% of the vote in 2012. She is running.[46] She is being challenged in the Democratic primary by Angelica Earl.[46]

Attorney General Josh Hawley,[46] Libertarian presidential candidate in 2016 Austin Petersen,[46] assistant dean of aviation at University of Central Missouri Tony Monetti,[46] and Courtland Sykes,[46] are running for the Republican nomination. Japeth Campbell has declared his candidacy for the Libertarian nomination.[46]

Montana

Montana election

  JonTester (cropped) Matt Rosendale (cropped)
Nominee Jon Tester Matt Rosendale
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Jon Tester
Democratic



Two-term Democrat Jon Tester was re-elected with 49% of the vote in 2012. He won the Democratic nomination in the June 5 primary with no opposition.[47]

State Auditor Matthew Rosendale[47] won the Republican nomination in the June 5 primary. State Senator Albert Olszewski,[47] former judge Russell Fagg,[47] and Troy Downing[47] also ran for the Republican nomination.

Green Party candidate Steve Kelly is running.[47]

Nebraska

Nebraska election

  Deb Fischer, official portrait, 115th Congress (cropped)
Jane Raybould
Nominee Deb Fischer Jane Raybould
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Deb Fischer
Republican



One-term Republican Deb Fischer was elected with 58% of the vote in 2012. She ran for and won the Republican nomination in the May 15 primary.[48] Other Republicans who ran include retired professor Jack Heidel, Todd Watson, and Dennis Frank Macek.[48]

Lincoln Councilwoman Jane Raybould ran for and won the Democratic nomination in the May 15 primary.[48] Other Democrats who ran include Frank Svoboda, Chris Janicek, and Larry Marvin, who was a candidate in 2008, 2012, and 2014.[48]

Jim Schultz is running for the Libertarian nomination.[48]

Nevada

Nevada election

  Dean Heller, official portrait, 114th Congress Jacky Rosen
Nominee Dean Heller Jacky Rosen
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Dean Heller
Republican



Incumbent Republican Dean Heller is the Republican nominee.[83] He was appointed to the seat in 2011 and then reelected elected with 46% of the vote in 2012. Heller considered running for governor, but chose to seek re-election,[49]

Representative Jacky Rosen[49] is the Democratic nominee.[83]

New Jersey

New Jersey election

  Robert Menendez official Senate portrait Robert J. Hugin
Nominee Bob Menendez Bob Hugin
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Bob Menendez
Democratic



Republican Bob Hugin[50] was nominated to face two-term Democrat Bob Menendez, who was re-elected with 59% of the vote in 2012. Menendez was originally appointed to the seat in January 2006. He is running.[50]

New Mexico

New Mexico election

  Martin Heinrich, official portrait, 113th Congress
Nominee Martin Heinrich Mick Rich
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Martin Heinrich
Democratic



One-term Democrat Martin Heinrich was elected with 51% of the vote in 2012. He is running.[51] Mick Rich won the Republican nomination unopposed.[51]

Aubrey Dunn Jr., New Mexico Commissioner of Public Lands and otherwise the first Libertarian to ever hold statewide elected office in history, has announced his run for the seat.[51]

New York

One-term Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand was elected with 72% of the vote in 2012. She had previously been appointed to the seat in 2009 and won a special election to remain in office in 2010. She is running.[52]

Private equity executive Chele Chiavacci Farley has been nominated for U.S. Senate by the Republican and Conservative Parties.[52]

North Dakota

North Dakota election

  Heidi Heitkamp official portrait 113th Congress Kevin Cramer official photo (cropped)
Nominee Heidi Heitkamp Kevin Cramer
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Heidi Heitkamp
Democratic



One-term Democrat Heidi Heitkamp was elected with 50% of the vote in 2012. She won the Democratic nomination unopposed.[53]

Congressman Kevin Cramer[53] won the Republican nomination in the June 12 primary. Former Niagara, North Dakota Mayor Thomas O'Neill[53] also ran for the Republican nomination.

Ohio

Ohio election

  Sherrod Brown official photo 2009 2 Jim Renacci, Official Portrait, 112th Congress (cropped 3)
Nominee Sherrod Brown Jim Renacci
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Sherrod Brown
Democratic



Two-term Democrat Sherrod Brown was re-elected with 51% of the vote in 2012. He is running and was unopposed in Democratic primary.[54]

U.S. Representative Jim Renacci ran for and won the Republican nomination in the May 8 primary.[54] Other Republicans who ran include investment banker Michael Gibbons,[54] businesswoman Melissa Ackison,[54] Dan Kiley,[54] and Don Elijah Eckhart.[54]

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania election

  Bob Casey Jr. official photo Lou Barletta (cropped 2)
Nominee Bob Casey Jr. Lou Barletta
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Bob Casey Jr.
Democratic



Two-term Democrat Bob Casey Jr. was re-elected with 54% of the vote in 2012. He is running and won the Democratic primary unopposed.[56]

U.S. Representative Lou Barletta ran for and won the Republican nomination in the May 15 primary.[56] Jim Christiana also ran for the Republican nomination.[56]

Rhode Island

Two-term Democrat Sheldon Whitehouse was re-elected with 64% of the vote in 2012. He is running.[57]

State Representative Robert Nardolillo[59] and former Rhode Island Supreme Court Associate Justice Robert Flanders[58] are running for the Republican nomination.

Tennessee

Two-term Republican Bob Corker was re-elected with 65% of the vote in 2012. Senator Corker filed his Statement of Candidacy with the Secretary of the U.S. Senate to run for re-election,[84] but on September 26, 2017, Senator Corker announced his intent to retire.[85]

Aaron Pettigrew[60] and Republican U.S. Representative Marsha Blackburn[60] are running for the Republican nomination.

Former Tennessee Governor Phil Bredesen[60] is seeking the Democratic nomination.

Texas

Texas election

  Ted Cruz, official portrait, 113th Congress (cropped 4) Beto O%27Rourke, Official portrait, 113th Congress (cropped 2)
Nominee Ted Cruz Beto O'Rourke
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Ted Cruz
Republican



One-term Republican Ted Cruz was elected with 57% of the vote in 2012. He overwhelmingly won the Republican primary on March 6, 2018.[62][86]

Television producer Bruce Jacobson,[87] Houston energy attorney Stefano de Stefano,[88] former mayor of La Marque Geraldine Sam,[89] Mary Miller,[90] and Thomas Dillingham[91] were Cruz's opponents.

U.S. Representative Beto O'Rourke won the Democratic nomination on March 6, 2018.[92] Other Democrats who ran include Irasema Ramirez Hernandez[93] and Edward Kimbrough.[94]

Nurse Carl Bible ran as an independent.[61]

Bob McNeil ran with the American Citizen Party.[66]

Utah

Seven-term Republican Orrin Hatch was re-elected with 65% of the vote in 2012. Hatch is the President pro tempore of the United States Senate, as well as the second most-senior Senator. Before the 2012 election, Hatch said that he would retire at the end of his seventh term if he was re-elected.[95] Hatch initially announced his re-election campaign on March 9, 2017,[96][97] but later announced his plans to retire on January 2, 2018. 2012 Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is running for the seat. Attorney Larry Meyers is also running for the Republican nomination.[68]

Professor James Singer was running for the Democratic nomination, but he dropped out and endorsed Salt Lake County Councilwoman Jenny Wilson, who made her Senate bid official on July 17, 2017.[98][99] Danny Drew[100][101] also was running but dropped out and endorsed Jenny Wilson. Mitchell Kent Vice was defeated for the Democratic nomination by Wilson.

Vermont

Two-term Independent Senator Bernie Sanders was re-elected with 71% of the vote in 2012. Sanders, one of two independent members of Congress, has caucused with the Democratic Party since taking office in 2007. In November 2015, Sanders announced his plans to run as a Democrat, rather than an Independent, in all future elections. He is running.[69]

Folasade Adeluola is running for the Democratic nomination.[69]

Virginia

Virginia election

  Tim Kaine, official 113th Congress photo portrait Corey Stewart 8 by 10 crop
Nominee Tim Kaine Corey Stewart
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Tim Kaine
Democratic



One-term Democrat Tim Kaine was elected with 53% of the vote in 2012. He was re-nominated unopposed.[70] Prince William County Supervisor Corey Stewart[70] is the Republican nominee. Matt Waters is the Libertarian nominee.[102]

Washington

Three-term Democrat Maria Cantwell was re-elected with 61% of the vote in 2012. She is running.[72]

Former state Republican Party chair Susan Hutchison is running.[72]

Jennifer Gigi Ferguson andDave Strider are running as independents.[72]

Mike Luke is running with the Libertarian Party.[72]

West Virginia

West Virginia election

  Senator Manchin (cropped 2) Patrick Morrisey by Gage Skidmore
Nominee Joe Manchin Patrick Morrisey
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Joe Manchin
Democratic



One-term Democrat Joe Manchin was elected with 61% of the vote in 2012. He originally won the seat in a 2010 special election. Manchin is running for re-election and won the May 8 Democratic primary.[73] Environmental activist Paula Jean Swearengin,[73] also ran for the Democratic nomination.

West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey received the Republican nomination in the May 8 primary. Representative Evan Jenkins,[73] coal miner Bo Copley,[73] Jack Newbrough, Don Blankenship, and Tom Willis ran for the Republican nomination.[73]

Wisconsin

One-term Democrat Tammy Baldwin was elected with 51% of the vote in 2012. She is running.[74]

State Senator Leah Vukmir[74] and businessman and member of Wisconsin Board of Veterans Affairs Kevin Nicholson[74] are running for the Republican nomination.

Wyoming

One-term Republican John Barrasso was elected with 76% of the vote in 2012. Barrasso was appointed to the seat in 2007 and won a special election in 2008. He is running.[75]

58 year old Gary Trauner,[75] a Jackson Hole businessman and US House candidate in 2006 and 2008, is running for the Democratic nomination.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Including the United States Senate special election in Mississippi, 2018
  2. ^ Including the United States Senate special election in Minnesota, 2018
  3. ^ Mississippi will hold runoff for special election on November 27, 2018, in which no one candidate wins a majority of the vote in the November 6, 2018 jungle primary.
  4. ^ American Citizen Party does not have ballot access in Texas. Bob McNeil appears on ballot as "Independent."[65]

References

  1. ^ Michael Wines (October 14, 2017). "Wary of Hackers, States Move to Upgrade Voting Systems". Nytimes.com. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  2. ^ a b Dick, Jason (January 20, 2016). "Senate Democrats, 2018 Math Is Not Your Friend". Roll Call. Retrieved August 2, 2016.
  3. ^ Livingston, Abby (January 6, 2017). "Rep. Beto O'Rourke "very likely" to run for Sen. Ted Cruz's seat in 2018". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved January 19, 2017.
  4. ^ Pramuk, Jacob (September 26, 2017). "Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee will not seek re-election, long-shot opportunity for Democrats". CNBC. Retrieved September 26, 2017.
  5. ^ Kondik, Kyle (July 25, 2013). "Senate 2014 and Beyond". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved September 19, 2013.
  6. ^ Fram, Alan (November 11, 2016). "Several Democrats facing 2018 re-election are from states Trump carried". PBS NewsHour. Retrieved November 12, 2016.
  7. ^ Bobic, Igor (November 5, 2014). "Independent Angus King Will Continue To Caucus With Senate Democrats". Huffington Post. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  8. ^ Gaudiano, Nicole (October 23, 2014). "Bernie Sanders to caucus with GOP? Fat chance, he says". USA Today. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  9. ^ "2016 State PVI Changes – Decision Desk HQ". decisiondeskhq.com. December 15, 2017.
  10. ^ "2018 Senate Race Ratings". Cook Political Report. January 5, 2018.
  11. ^ "Senate Ratings". Inside Elections. January 5, 2018.
  12. ^ "2017-2018 Crystal Ball Senate race ratings map". University of Virginia Center for Politics. May 9, 2018.
  13. ^ "2018 Election Calendar and Results". The New York Times. Retrieved January 24, 2018.
  14. ^ "CNN Key Races: Democrats' tough Senate map". CNN. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  15. ^ "Battle for the Senate 2018". RCP. Retrieved March 28, 2018.
  16. ^ "Fox News Midterms 2018 America's Election HQ". Fox News. Retrieved June 12, 2018.
  17. ^ "Daily Kos Elections releases initial Senate race ratings for 2018". Daily Kos. June 14, 2018.
  18. ^ "Daily Kos Elections 2018 Primary Calendar". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  19. ^ a b "2018 Primary and Runoff Elections for Statewide offices and Congress Chronologically with Filing Deadlines". The Green Papers. Retrieved November 14, 2017.
  20. ^ "2018 Poll Closing Times for Statewide office and Congress General Election Chronologically". The Green Papers. Retrieved November 14, 2017.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "Candidate Filings - 2018 State General Election". Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved May 31, 2018.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "2018 Mississippi Candidate Qualifying List" (PDF). Mississippi Secretary of State. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "2018 Primary Election". Arizona Secretary of State. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "California Candidate List" (PDF). California Secretary of State. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  25. ^ a b c Bass, Paul (December 23, 2016). "Murphy Navigates A Changed World". New Haven Independent. Retrieved December 29, 2016.
  26. ^ a b "ADAMS, ANN MARIE DR - Candidate overview - FEC.gov". FEC.gov.
  27. ^ a b Altimari, Danielle (August 22, 2017). "Corey Planning U.S. Senate Run Against Murphy". Hartford Courant. Retrieved August 22, 2017.
  28. ^ a b McGuiness, Dylan (June 27, 2017). "Branford Republican Announces Campaign for U.S. Senate". Hartford Courant. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  29. ^ a b c "Kailani Koenig on Twitter". July 24, 2017. Retrieved July 24, 2017.
  30. ^ "United States Senate election in Delaware, 2018". Wikipedia. 2018-04-28.
  31. ^ Mueller, Sarah. "Kerri Harris challenges Carper in September primary". Retrieved March 11, 2018.
  32. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Candidate Listing for 2018 General Election". Florida Department of State. Retrieved April 10, 2018.
  33. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Candidates Filing Report". Hawaii Office of Election. Retrieved June 3, 2018.
  34. ^ a b c d e f "Indiana Secretary of State Official Candidates" (PDF). Indiana Secretary of State. February 10, 2018. Retrieved February 10, 2018.
  35. ^ a b c d "Maine Candidates Lists". Leuitenant Governor Election. Retrieved March 17, 2018.
  36. ^ a b "Maine General Election Candidates List". Maine Secretary os State. Retrieved June 8, 2018.
  37. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Elections, Maryland State Board of. "2018 Candidate Listing". elections.state.md.us. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  38. ^ a b "Independent to launch bid for Senate in Maryland". POLITICO. Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  39. ^ a b "Shlikas will fix it!". Shlikas for Senate. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  40. ^ a b "Dr. Shiva Ayyadurai on Twitter: "Today Shiva 4 Senate dumped the MA GOP Establishment and Declared Our Independence". Twitter. November 11, 2017. Retrieved November 11, 2017.
  41. ^ a b c d e f "2018 State Primary - Republican Candidates for Nomination". Secretary of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved June 6, 2018.
  42. ^ a b "2018 State Primary - Democratic Candidates for Nomination". Secretary of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved June 6, 2018.
  43. ^ a b c d e f "2018 Michigan Candidate Listing". Michigan Secretary of State. Retrieved April 24, 2018.
  44. ^ "Who's running for Congress in Michigan? Here's what we know". Detroit Free Press. Retrieved 2018-05-05.
  45. ^ Johnson, Ruth (August 22, 2017). "State of Michigan Political Party Status" (PDF). State of Michigan.
  46. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab "Missouri Candidates Lists". Missouri Secretary of State. Retrieved March 17, 2018.
  47. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Montana Primary Candidates Lists". Montana Secretary of state.
  48. ^ a b c d e f g h "Official Nebraska Candidate Lists" (PDF). Nebraska Secretary of State. March 1, 2018. Retrieved March 2, 2018.
  49. ^ a b c d e f g "Nevada Candidates Lists". Nevada Secretary of state.
  50. ^ a b c d "Unofficial List Candidates of US Senate" (PDF). New Jersey Election. Retrieved April 11, 2018.
  51. ^ a b c d e f "New Mexico Major Parties Candidates". KRWG.org. Retrieved March 26, 2018.
  52. ^ a b c d e "Who Filed Report". New York State Board of Election. Retrieved April 10, 2018.
  53. ^ a b c d e "2018 Primary Contest Candidate List". North Dakota Secretary of State. Retrieved April 9, 2018.
  54. ^ a b c d e f g h "Secretary of State Jon Husted Receives Statewide Candidate Petitions for May Primary". Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved March 23, 2018.
  55. ^ "FARLEY, PHILENA IRENE - Candidate overview". FEC.gov. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
  56. ^ a b c d e "Pennsylvania Candidates Lists". Pennsylvania Secretary of State. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  57. ^ a b c Gregg, Katherine (December 22, 2016). "Sen. Whitehouse: 'Plenty of opportunity for us to have fights with the president'". The Providence Journal. Retrieved December 27, 2016.
  58. ^ a b "FLANDERS, ROBERT MR - Candidate overview". FEC.gov.
  59. ^ a b "NARDOLILLO, ROBERT ANTHONY III - Candidate overview". FEC.gov.
  60. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u "Tennessee candidates Lists" (PDF). Tennessee Secretary of State. Retrieved March 23, 2018.
  61. ^ a b "BIBLE, CARL ALEXANDER - Candidate overview". FEC.gov. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  62. ^ a b Sullivan, Sean (May 11, 2016). "Ted Cruz files to run for reelection to the Senate in 2018". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 25, 2016.
  63. ^ "DIKEMAN, NEAL MONROE - Candidate overview". FEC.gov. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
  64. ^ "Cruz Leads O'Rourke in New Senate Poll". amarillopioneer.com. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
  65. ^ "Bob McNeil - Ballotpedia". ballotpedia.org. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
  66. ^ a b "AmericanCitizenParty.us". americancitizenparty.us.
  67. ^ Tracy, Abigail (May 31, 2017). "Meet the Kennedyesque Democrat trying to beat Ted Cruz". Vanity Fair. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  68. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Utah Candidats Lists". Utah Lieutenant Governor Election. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  69. ^ a b c d e f g "2018 Candidates listing". Vermont Secretary of State. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  70. ^ a b c d "Certified Candidates and Ballot Order for June 12, 2018 Primary Elections" (PDF). Virginia Department of Elections. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  71. ^ "Waters For U.S. Senate -- The Virginian". Matt Waters for US Senate. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
  72. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af "2018 Candidates Who Have Filed". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved May 18, 2018.
  73. ^ a b c d e f g "West Virginia Candidates Lists" (PDF). West Virginia Secretary of State. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  74. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Candidate Tracking by Office" (PDF). Wisconsin Election Commission. Retrieved June 11, 2018.
  75. ^ a b c d e f g h "2018 Primary Election Candidate Roster" (PDF). Wyoming Secretary of State. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
  76. ^ Jeff Flake (October 24, 2017). "Flake Announces Senate Future". United States Senator Jeff Flake. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  77. ^ a b "Candidate List - 2018 Primary Election" (PDF). Indiana Secretary of State. February 12, 2018. Retrieved February 12, 2018.
  78. ^ Blake, Aaron (November 5, 2014). "Angus King and Joe Manchin are sticking with the Democrats. Because, of course". Washington Post. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  79. ^ "Michigan's 14th Congressional District election, 2016 - Ballotpedia". Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  80. ^ "CERTIFICATE OF APPOINTMENT OF UNITED STATES SENATOR FROM MINNESOTA" (PDF). January 2, 2018. Retrieved February 23, 2018.
  81. ^ Jacobs, Ben (March 5, 2018). "Mississippi Senator Thad Cochran announces he is stepping down". the Guardian. Retrieved March 5, 2018.
  82. ^ "Tupelo Mayor Jason Shelton pulls out of U.S. senate race". wcbi.com. May 8, 2018. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
  83. ^ a b "United States Senate election in Nevada, 2018".
  84. ^ "Larry Crim Announces U.S. Senate 2018 Race For Seat Held By Corker". chattanoogan.com. Retrieved February 21, 2017.
  85. ^ "Corker to end Senate career with this term". Retrieved September 26, 2017.
  86. ^ "Ted Cruz plans to run for re-election in 2018". CNN. Retrieved November 22, 2016.
  87. ^ Wang, Jackie (November 16, 2017). "Christian TV producer challenging Sen. Ted Cruz in GOP primary". Dallas Morning News. Retrieved November 16, 2017.
  88. ^ "Statement of Organization" (PDF). FEC Form 1. June 9, 2017. Retrieved June 14, 2017.
  89. ^ Tinsley, Anna M. (November 11, 2017). "2018 Election: First day of filing begins with a rush of candidates". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved November 16, 2017.
  90. ^ "MILLER, MARY ANN - Candidate overview". FEC.gov.
  91. ^ "Former Birdville schools employee joins GOP race to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz". Star-Telegram. Retrieved December 1, 2017.
  92. ^ "Texas democrat Beto O'Rourke announces bid to unseat Ted Cruz". Business Insider. Associated Press. Retrieved March 31, 2017.
  93. ^ "HERNANDEZ, IRASEMA RAMIREZ - Candidate overview". FEC.gov.
  94. ^ Tinsley, Anna (December 9, 2017). "Deadline for 2018 primary ballot: Monday. Here's who is already in the race". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  95. ^ Lederman, Josh (March 3, 2012). "Hatch will retire in 2018 if he wins reelection". The Hill.
  96. ^ Raju, Manu (March 9, 2017). "First on CNN: After lobbying from Trump, Orrin Hatch plans to run again". CNN. Retrieved March 11, 2017.
  97. ^ Dennis Romboy (November 6, 2014). "Sen. Orrin Hatch leaves door ajar for run in 2018". Deseret News. Retrieved December 12, 2014.
  98. ^ Tanner, Courtney (May 3, 2017). "Navajo candidate announces bid as Democrat for Hatch's seat". The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  99. ^ Breiner, Andrew (June 21, 2017). "Navajo Candidate Drops Out of Race Against Hatch". Roll Call. Retrieved June 21, 2017.
  100. ^ Schott, Bryan (April 12, 2017). "Another Democrat looking to knock off Hatch in 2008". Utah Policy. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  101. ^ "Thank You". Danny Drew For U.S. Senate. Retrieved October 3, 2017.
  102. ^ http://christiannewswire.com/news/9627481257.html

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.