Seattle Audubon Society

Last updated on 13 December 2016

Seattle Audubon Society is a non-profit environmental organization dedicated to protecting birds and the natural environment by involving volunteers and the community in education, advocacy, preservation, science and enjoyment. Founded in 1916 to observe and protect birds, it is a chapter organization of the National Audubon Society, and is the oldest natural history organization in the Pacific Northwest.

The society publishes a monthly newsletter, EarthCare Northwest, on its current news. Seattle Audubon Conservation department is involved in the restoration of urban, aquatic and wetland habitat, with a special emphasis on areas needed by migratory birds. Other initiatives include engaging consumers to switch to songbird-friendly shade-grown coffee through the Northwest Shade Coffee Campaign, preservation of Cascade Range forests through the Cascades Conservation Partnership, and the Keep Your Cats Indoors Campaign and Gardening for Life neighborhood workshops. In 2002 Seattle Audubon launched BirdWeb, an online guide including species of special concern, rarities, and a searchable database of birds. In 2005, BirdNote, a two-minute radio show about birds and nature, created under the auspices of Seattle Audubon, began airing on KPLU, a local National Public Radio affiliate.

Its environmental education programs include Finding Urban Nature (FUN) for elementary schools, Student Naturalist BirdWatch Service Corps for high schoolers, and Nature Camp for grades 1-9 in the summer. Seattle Audubon also offers classes and field trips for adults, including Master Birder, an intensive year-long course, and provides educational resources to the community at large.

Its main office is in Wedgwood, Seattle, Washington. It serves a chapter area in a large part of King County, Washington. Seattle Audubon works with the Seattle Parks and Recreation Department, King County Parks, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, other government agencies and municipalities, the National Audubon Society, and other local Audubon chapters.

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