Pistyll Rhaeadr

Last updated on 20 June 2017

Pistyll Rhaeadr (Welsh pronunciation: [pɪstɪɬ r̥aeadr], meaning "spring of the waterfall") is a waterfall, located a few miles from the village of Llanrhaeadr-ym-Mochnant in Powys, Wales, twelve miles west of Oswestry.

Pistyll Rhaeadr
Pistyll Rhaeadr 0073.JPG
Pistyll Rhaeadr. Note the natural arch in the middle.
Wales relief location map.jpg
Pistyll Rhaeadr
Location Wales Llanrhaeadr-ym-Mochnant, Powys, Wales
OS grid SJ 0726 2951
Coordinates 52°51′17.97″N 3°22′42.74″W / 52.8549917°N 3.3785389°WCoordinates: 52°51′17.97″N 3°22′42.74″W / 52.8549917°N 3.3785389°W
Type Plunge
Total height 240 feet (73 m)

Description

Pistyll Rhaeadr is formed by the Afon Disgynfa falling, in three stages, over a 240-foot (73 m)[1] Silurian cliff-face, below which the river is known as the Afon Rhaeadr. The tallest stage is estimated at about 40 metres.[2] It is counted as one of the Seven Wonders of Wales and is a Site of Special Scientific Interest. The 19th century author George Borrow, in his book Wild Wales, remarked of the waterfall: "What shall I liken it to? I scarcely know, unless it is to an immense skein of silk agitated and disturbed by tempestuous blasts, or to the long tail of a grey courser at furious speed. I never saw water falling so gracefully, so much like thin, beautiful threads as here."

There is car parking space near the foot of the waterfall for people who want to explore the waterfall, with a café and a B&B alongside.

The waterfall is often referred to by the media,[3][4] government sources,[5] and other sources[6] as the tallest in Wales or the tallest single drop in the United Kingdom.[7] However, it is not a single drop, and both its single drop height and its total height are surpassed by both the Devil's Appendix and Pistyll y Llyn, as well as several other waterfalls.[8][9]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Kerry Ridgeway" (PDF). Walking in Mid-Wales and the Brecon Beacons. Powys County Council Tourism Services Unit. p. 27. Retrieved 1 September 2009.
  2. ^ "Wales 2008". Retrieved 9 September 2009.
  3. ^ "Waterfall 1000th on protected list". BBC News. 22 May 2000. Retrieved 9 September 2009.
  4. ^ "Times Walks: Pistyll Rhaeadr, Wales". Times Online. London. 25 April 2009. Retrieved 9 September 2009.
  5. ^ "Kerry Ridgeway" (PDF). Walking in Mid-Wales and the Brecon Beacons. Powys County Council Tourism Services Unit. p. 27. Retrieved 1 September 2009.
  6. ^ "Pistyll Rhaeadr". Retrieved 9 September 2009.
  7. ^ "Pistyll Rhaeadr". Retrieved 9 September 2009.
  8. ^ Des Marshall (2009). Walking to Mid Wales' Waterfalls. Machynlleth, Wales: Kittiwake. pp. 1, 2. ISBN 978-1-902302-69-0.
  9. ^ "The tallest waterfalls in Wales". Retrieved 4 February 2010.

External links

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.