Paper cut

Last updated on 20 November 2017

A paper cut occurs when a piece of paper or other thin, sharp material slices a person's skin. Paper cuts, though named from paper, can also be caused by other thin, stiff, and abrasive materials.

Although a loose paper sheet is usually too soft to cut, it can be very thin (sometimes as thin as a razor edge), being then able to exert high levels of pressure, enough to cut the skin. Paper cuts are most often caused by paper sheets that are strongly fastened together (such as brand new sheet of paper out of a ream), because one single paper sheet might be dislocated from the rest. Thus all the other sheets are holding this dislocated sheet in position, making it stiff enough to act as a razor.

Paper cuts can be surprisingly painful as they can stimulate a large number of skin surface nociceptors (pain receptors) in a very small area of the skin. Because the shallow cut does not bleed very much, the pain receptors are left open to the air, causing continued pain. This is exacerbated by irritation caused by the fibers in the paper itself, which may be coated in chemicals such as bleach. Additionally, most paper cuts occur in the fingers, which have a greater concentration of sensory receptors than the rest of the body.

Paper cut
Oww Papercut 14365.jpg
A small paper cut
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 W45
ICD-9-CM E920.8

Complications

Although painful, paper cuts usually heal without complications if cleaned correctly. Without proper treatment, cellulitis and even deadly necrotizing may occur as bacteria are given a portal of entry past the defense of human skin.[1]It can also cause for bacteria to grow in the body, and cause infections.

References

External links

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