Massachusetts's 11th congressional district

Massachusetts Congressional District 11 is an obsolete congressional district in eastern Massachusetts. It was eliminated in 1993 after the 1990 U.S. Census. Its last Congressman was Brian Donnelly; its most notable were John Quincy Adams following his term as president, eventual president John F. Kennedy and Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill.

1901 District 11 detail of Massachusetts Congressional Districts map BPL 12688
Massachusetts's 11th congressional district, 1901
Massachusetts congressional districts large.pdf
Massachusetts's current districts, since 2013

Cities and towns in the district

1890s

1893: Suffolk County: Boston, Wards 21, 22. 23, 25. "Middlesex County: City of Newton, towns of Belmont, Holliston, Sherborn, and Water- town. Norfolk County: Towns of Bellingham, Brookline, Dedham, Dover, Foxboro, Franklin, Hyde Park, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Needham, Norfolk, Norwood, Sharon, Walpole, and Wrentham. Bristol County: Town of North Attleboro. Worcester County: Towns of Hopedale and Milford."[1]

1910s-1940s

1916: Suffolk County: Boston Wards 10, 11 (Precincts 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9), 12, 18, 19, 21, 22, 23.[2]

1921: Boston (Wards 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 22, 23).[3]

1941: Boston (Wards 1, 2, 3, 22), Cambridge, Somerville (Wards 1, 2, 3).[4]

1960s-1980s

1968: "Norfolk County: City of Quincy. Towns of Avon, Braintree, Canton, Dedham, Holbrook, Milton, Norwood, Randolph, Sharon, Stoughton, and Weymouth. Plymouth County: City of Brockton. Suffolk County: City of Boston: Ward 18."[5]

1977: "Norfolk County: City of Quincy. Towns of Avon, Braintree, Holbrook, Milton, Randolph, and Stoughton. Plymouth County: City of Brockton. Towns of Abington and Whitman. Suffolk County: City of Boston: Wards 15, 16, 17, 18."[6]

1985: "Norfolk County: City of Quincy. Towns of Avon, Braintree, Holbrook, Milton, Randolph, and Weymouth. Plymouth County: City of Brockton. Towns of Abington, East Bridgewater, Rockland, West Bridgewater, and Whitman. Suffolk County: City of Boston: Wards 15, 16, 17, and 18."[7]

List of representatives

Representative Party Years District home Electoral history
No image Theophilus Bradbury Federalist March 4, 1795 –
July 24, 1797
Newburyport Resigned to become a state Massachusetts Supreme Court Justice
Vacant July 25, 1797 –
November 26, 1797
No image Bailey Bartlett Federalist November 27, 1797 –
March 3, 1801
Essex County Retired
ManassehCutlerPortrait Menasseh Cutler Federalist March 4, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
Hamilton Redistricted to the 3rd district
No image William Stedman Federalist March 4, 1803 –
July 16, 1810
[Data unknown/missing.] Resigned to serve as Clerk of Courts for Worcester County
Vacant July 16, 1810 –
October 8, 1810
No image Abijah Bigelow Federalist October 8, 1810 –
March 3, 1815
Leominster Retired
Elijah Brigham Elijah Brigham Federalist March 4, 1815 –
February 22, 1816
Westborough
(now Northborough)
Redistricted from the 10th district,
Died
Vacant February 22, 1816 –
December 1, 1816
No image Benjamin Adams Federalist December 2, 1816 –
March 3, 1821
Uxbridge Lost re-election
No image Johnathan Russell Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
No image Aaron Hobart Adams-Clay
Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
[Data unknown/missing.] Redistricted from the 8th district
Adams March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
[Data unknown/missing.]
No image Joseph Richardson Adams March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1829
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
Anti-
Jacksonian
March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1831
[Data unknown/missing.]
John Quincy Adams - copy of 1843 Philip Haas Daguerreotype John Quincy Adams Anti-
Jacksonian
March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
Braintree Redistricted to the 12th district
No image John Reed, Jr. Anti-
Jacksonian
March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1835
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
Anti-
Masonic
March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
[Data unknown/missing.]
Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1841
[Data unknown/missing.]
No image Barker Burnell Whig March 4, 1841 –
March 3, 1843
[Data unknown/missing.] Redistricted to the 10th district
District eliminated 1843 [Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
District recreated 1853 [Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
JohnZGoodrich John Z. Goodrich Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
[Data unknown/missing.] Redistricted from the 7th district
Mark Trafton Mark Trafton Know
Nothing
March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
HLDawes Henry L. Dawes[8] Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1863
[Data unknown/missing.] Redistricted to the 10th district
District eliminated 1863 [Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
District recreated 1873 [Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
HLDawes Henry L. Dawes Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
[Data unknown/missing.] Redistricted from the 10th district
CWChapin Chester W. Chapin Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
GovGeorgeDRobinson George D. Robinson[9][10] Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1883
[Data unknown/missing.] Redistricted to the 12th district
William Whiting II (politician) picture2 William Whiting Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1889
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
Rodney Wallace (politician) picture Rodney Wallace Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
Frederick S. Coolidge Frederick S. Coolidge Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
William Franklin Draper (April 9, 1842 - January 28, 1910) William F. Draper Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1897
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
Charles F. Sprague Charles F. Sprague[11] Republican March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1901
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
Samuel Leland Powers Samuel L. Powers Republican March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1903
Newton Redistricted to the 12th district
John Andrew Sullivan John Andrew Sullivan Democratic March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1907
Boston [Data unknown/missing.]
Andrew James Peters 42nd Mayor of Boston Andrew J. Peters[12] Democratic March 4, 1907 –
August 15, 1914
Boston Resigned after being appointed Asst. Secretary to the US Treasury Department
Vacant August 15, 1914 –
March 4, 1915
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
George H. Tinkham George H. Tinkham Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1933
Boston Redistricted to the 10th district
John Joseph Douglass John J. Douglass Democratic March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
Boston Redistricted from the 10th district
John P. Higgins Democratic January 3, 1935 –
September 30, 1937
Boston Resigned after being appointed as chief justice of Superior Court of Massachusetts
Vacant September 30, 1937 –
December 14, 1937
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
ThomasAFlaherty Thomas A. Flaherty[13] Democratic December 14, 1937 –
January 3, 1943
Boston Retired
James Michael Curley James Michael Curley Democratic January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1947
Boston Retired
John F. Kennedy, White House color photo portrait John F. Kennedy Democratic January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1953
Boston Elected to US Senate
Tip O%27Neill 1978 (retouched) Tip O'Neill Democratic January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1963
Cambridge Redistricted to the 8th district
James A. Burke James A. Burke[5] Democratic January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1979
Milton Redistricted from the 13th district
Brian J. Donnelly Brian J. Donnelly[14] Democratic January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1993
Boston Retired
District eliminated January 3, 1993 [Data unknown/missing.]

References

  1. ^ Francis M. Cox (1893). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Third Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  2. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 64th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1916.
  3. ^ Commonwealth of Massachusetts (1921), "Population of Congressional Districts", Population of Massachusetts as determined by the fourteenth census of the United States 1920, Boston: Wright & Potter
  4. ^ Commonwealth of Massachusetts (1941), "Population of Congressional Districts", Population of Massachusetts as determined by the sixteenth census of the United States, 1940, Boston: Wright & Potter, OCLC 10056477, House No. 2849
  5. ^ a b "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 90th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1968.
  6. ^ "Massachusetts", 1977 Official Congressional Directory: 95th Congress, Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1977
  7. ^ "Massachusetts". 1985-1986 Official Congressional Directory: 99th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1985.
  8. ^ "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the Second Session of the Thirty-Seventh Congress. Washington DC: House of Representatives. 1861.
  9. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1878). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 45th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  10. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1882). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 47th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  11. ^ L.A. Coolidge (1897). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Fifth Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  12. ^ A.J. Halford (1909). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 60th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  13. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 75th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1938.
  14. ^ "Massachusetts". 1991-1992 Official Congressional Directory: 102nd Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1991.

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