List of Governors of Delaware

The Governor of Delaware (President of Delaware from 1776 to 1792) is the head of the executive branch of Delaware's state government and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces. The governor has a duty to enforce state laws, and the power to either approve or veto bills passed by the Delaware Legislature, to convene the legislature,[2] and to grant pardons, except in cases of impeachment, and only with the recommendation of the Board of Pardons.[3]

There have been 70 people who have served as governor, over 73 distinct terms. Additionally, Henry Molleston was elected, but died before he could take office. Only four governors have been elected to two consecutive terms, with the longest-serving being Ruth Ann Minner, who was elected twice after succeeding to the office, serving a total of just over eight years. The shortest term is that of Dale E. Wolf, who served 18 days following his predecessor's resignation; David P. Buckson served 19 days under similar circumstances. The current governor is Democrat John Carney, who took office on January 17, 2017.

Governor of Delaware
John C. Carney Jr. official portrait 112th Congress
Incumbent
John Carney

since January 17, 2017
Style The Honorable
Residence Delaware Governor's Mansion
Dover, Delaware
Term length Four years, renewable once
Inaugural holder John McKinly
Formation February 12, 1777
Deputy Bethany Hall-Long
Salary $171,000 (2013)[1]
Website governor.delaware.gov

Governors

Before 1776, Delaware was a colony of the Kingdom of Great Britain, administered by colonial governors in Pennsylvania as the "Lower Counties on Delaware".

In 1776, soon after Delaware and the other Thirteen Colonies declared independence from Britain, the state adopted its first state constitution. It created the office of President of Delaware, a chief executive to be chosen by the legislature to serve a term of three years.[4]

The office of President was renamed Governor by the constitution of 1792,[5] which set the commencement date of the term to the third Tuesday in the January following an election, and limited governors to serving only three out of any six years.[6] The term was lengthened to four years by the 1831 constitution, but governors were limited to a single term.[7] The current constitution of 1897 allows governors to serve two terms.[8]

The 1776 constitution stated that if the presidency were vacant, the speaker of the legislative council would be a vice-president.[9] The 1792 constitution has the speaker of the senate exercising the office when it is vacant, and the 1897 constitution created the office of lieutenant governor,[10] upon whom the office devolves in case of vacancy.[11] The offices of governor and lieutenant governor are elected at the same time but not on the same ticket.

Governors of the State of Delaware
No. Portrait Governor[a] Term in office Party Election Lt. Governor[b][c]
1   McKinly, JohnJohn McKinly February 12, 1777

September 12, 1777
No parties 1777
[d]
Office did not exist
Vacant September 12, 1777

September 22, 1777
2 ThomasMcKean McKean, ThomasThomas McKean September 22, 1777

October 20, 1777
3 GeorgeRead Read, GeorgeGeorge Read October 20, 1777

March 31, 1778
4 CaesarRodney.jpeg Rodney, CaesarCaesar Rodney March 31, 1778

November 6, 1781
1778
5 JohnDickinson4 Dickinson, JohnJohn Dickinson November 13, 1781

January 12, 1783
1781
[e]
6 Cook, JohnJohn Cook November 4, 1782

February 1, 1783
7 Van Dyke, NicholasNicholas Van Dyke February 1, 1783

October 28, 1786
1783
8 ThomasCollins Collins, ThomasThomas Collins October 28, 1786

March 29, 1789
1786
[f]
9 Davis, JehuJehu Davis March 29, 1789

June 2, 1789
10 JoshuaClayton Clayton, JoshuaJoshua Clayton June 2, 1789

January 19, 1796
Federalist 1789
1792
11 Bedford Sr., GunningGunning Bedford Sr. January 19, 1796

September 30, 1797
Federalist 1795
[g]
12 Rogers, DanielDaniel Rogers September 30, 1797

January 9, 1799
Federalist
13 Richard bassett Bassett, RichardRichard Bassett January 9, 1799

March 3, 1801
Federalist 1798
[h]
14 Sykes, JamesJames Sykes March 3, 1801

January 19, 1802
Federalist
15 Hall, DavidDavid Hall January 19, 1802

January 15, 1805
Democratic-Republican 1801
16 Mitchell, NathanielNathaniel Mitchell January 15, 1805

January 19, 1808
Federalist 1804
17 Truitt, GeorgeGeorge Truitt January 19, 1808

January 15, 1811
Federalist 1807
18 Haslet, JosephJoseph Haslet January 15, 1811

January 18, 1814
Democratic-Republican 1810
19 Daniel Rodney Rodney, DanielDaniel Rodney January 18, 1814

January 21, 1817
Federalist 1813
20 Clark, JohnJohn Clark January 21, 1817

January 18, 1820
Federalist 1816
Molleston, HenryHenry Molleston Federalist 1819
[i]
21 Stout, JacobJacob Stout January 18, 1820

January 16, 1821
Federalist
22 Collins, JohnJohn Collins January 16, 1821

April 16, 1822
Democratic-Republican
23 Rodney, CalebCaleb Rodney April 23, 1822

January 21, 1823
Federalist
24 Haslet, JosephJoseph Haslet January 21, 1823

June 20, 1823
Democratic-Republican 1822
[j]
25 Thomas, CharlesCharles Thomas June 23, 1823

January 20, 1824
Democratic-Republican
26 SamuelPaynter Paynter, SamuelSamuel Paynter January 20, 1824

January 16, 1827
Federalist 1823
27 CharlesPolk Polk Jr., CharlesCharles Polk Jr. January 16, 1827

January 19, 1830
Federalist 1826
28 DavidHazzard Hazzard, DavidDavid Hazzard January 19, 1830

January 15, 1833
National Republican 1829
29 CalebBennett Bennett, Caleb P.Caleb P. Bennett January 15, 1833

July 11, 1836
Democratic 1832
[k][l]
30 CharlesPolk Polk Jr., CharlesCharles Polk Jr. July 11, 1836

January 17, 1837
Whig
31 CorneliusComegys Comegys, Cornelius P.Cornelius P. Comegys January 17, 1837

January 19, 1841
Whig 1836
32 Cooper, William B.William B. Cooper January 19, 1841

January 21, 1845
Whig 1840
33 ThomasStockton Stockton, ThomasThomas Stockton January 21, 1845

March 2, 1846
Whig 1844
[m]
34 JosephMaull Maull, JosephJoseph Maull March 2, 1846

May 3, 1846
Whig
35 WilliamTemple Temple, WilliamWilliam Temple May 6, 1846

January 19, 1847
Whig
36 WilliamTharp Tharp, WilliamWilliam Tharp January 19, 1847

January 21, 1851
Democratic 1846
37 WilliamRoss Ross, William H. H.William H. H. Ross January 21, 1851

January 16, 1855
Democratic 1850
38 PeterCausey Causey, Peter F.Peter F. Causey January 16, 1855

January 18, 1859
American 1854
39 William Burton (governor) Burton, WilliamWilliam Burton January 18, 1859

January 20, 1863
Democratic 1858
40 WilliamCannon Cannon, WilliamWilliam Cannon January 20, 1863

March 1, 1865
Republican 1862
[n]
41 GoveSaulsbury Saulsbury, GoveGove Saulsbury March 1, 1865

January 17, 1871
Democratic
1866
42 JamesPonder Ponder, JamesJames Ponder January 17, 1871

January 19, 1875
Democratic 1870
43 CochranJohn Cochran, John P.John P. Cochran January 19, 1875

January 21, 1879
Democratic 1874
44 HallJohnWood Hall, John W.John W. Hall January 21, 1879

January 16, 1883
Democratic 1878
45 StockleyCharles Stockley, Charles C.Charles C. Stockley January 16, 1883

January 18, 1887
Democratic 1882
46 BenjaminBiggs Biggs, Benjamin T.Benjamin T. Biggs January 18, 1887

January 20, 1891
Democratic 1886
47 RobertReynolds Reynolds, Robert J.Robert J. Reynolds January 20, 1891

January 15, 1895
Democratic 1890
48 MarvilJoshua Marvil, Joshua H.Joshua H. Marvil January 15, 1895

April 8, 1895
Republican 1894
[o]
49 WilliamTharpWatson Watson, William T.William T. Watson April 8, 1895

January 19, 1897
Democratic
50 Ebetunnell Tunnell, Ebe W.Ebe W. Tunnell January 19, 1897

January 15, 1901
Democratic 1896
51 Hunn Hunn, JohnJohn Hunn January 15, 1901

January 17, 1905
Republican 1900   Cannon, Philip L.Philip L. Cannon
52 Preston Lea Lea, PrestonPreston Lea January 17, 1905

January 19, 1909
Republican 1904 Parker, Isaac T.Isaac T. Parker
53 Pennewill Pennewill, Simeon S.Simeon S. Pennewill January 19, 1909

January 21, 1913
Republican 1908 Mendinhall, John M.John M. Mendinhall
54 Miller 2989417695 76253e1e15 o Miller, Charles R.Charles R. Miller January 21, 1913

January 16, 1917
Republican 1912 Ferguson, ColenColen Ferguson[p]
55 John G. Townsend, Jr Townsend Jr., John G.John G. Townsend Jr. January 16, 1917

January 18, 1921
Republican 1916 Eliason, Lewis E.Lewis E. Eliason[p]
56 Denney, William D.William D. Denney January 18, 1921

January 20, 1925
Republican 1920 Bush, J. DanforthJ. Danforth Bush
57 Robinson, Robert P.Robert P. Robinson January 20, 1925

January 15, 1929
Republican 1924 Anderson, James H.James H. Anderson
58 C. Douglass Buck Buck, C. DouglassC. Douglass Buck January 15, 1929

January 19, 1937
Republican 1928 Hazel, James H.James H. Hazel
1932 Corley, Roy F.Roy F. Corley
59 McMullen, RichardRichard McMullen January 19, 1937

January 21, 1941
Democratic 1936 Cooch, Edward W.Edward W. Cooch
60 Bacon, Walter W.Walter W. Bacon January 21, 1941

January 18, 1949
Republican 1940 MacCollum, Isaac J.Isaac J. MacCollum[p]
1944 Carvel, Elbert N.Elbert N. Carvel[p]
61 Elbert N. Carvel 1962 Carvel, Elbert N.Elbert N. Carvel January 18, 1949

January 20, 1953
Democratic 1948 Bayard, Alexis I. du PontAlexis I. du Pont Bayard
62 BoggsCaleb Boggs, J. CalebJ. Caleb Boggs January 20, 1953

December 30, 1960
Republican 1952 Rollins, John W.John W. Rollins
1956
[q]
Buckson, David P.David P. Buckson
63 David Buckson Buckson, David P.David P. Buckson December 30, 1960

January 17, 1961
Republican Vacant
64 Elbert N. Carvel 1962 Carvel, Elbert N.Elbert N. Carvel January 17, 1961

January 19, 1965
Democratic 1960 Lammot, EugeneEugene Lammot
65 Terry Jr., Charles L.Charles L. Terry Jr. January 19, 1965

January 21, 1969
Democratic 1964 Tribbitt, Sherman W.Sherman W. Tribbitt
66 Peterson, Russell W.Russell W. Peterson January 21, 1969

January 16, 1973
Republican 1968 Bookhammer, EugeneEugene Bookhammer[r]
67 Tribbitt, Sherman W.Sherman W. Tribbitt January 16, 1973

January 18, 1977
Democratic 1972
68 DupontPETE (cropped) du Pont, PetePete du Pont January 18, 1977

January 15, 1985
Republican 1976 McGinnis, James D.James D. McGinnis[p]
1980 Castle, MikeMike Castle
69 Mike Castle 1982 Castle, MikeMike Castle January 15, 1985

December 31, 1992
Republican 1984 Woo, Shien BiauShien Biau Woo[p]
1988
[s]
Wolf, Dale E.Dale E. Wolf
70 Wolf, Dale E.Dale E. Wolf December 31, 1992

January 19, 1993
Republican Vacant
71 Thomas Carper Carper, TomTom Carper January 19, 1993

January 3, 2001
Democratic 1992 Minner, Ruth AnnRuth Ann Minner
1996
[t]
72 Ruth Ann Minner Minner, Ruth AnnRuth Ann Minner January 3, 2001

January 20, 2009
Democratic Vacant
2000 Carney, JohnJohn Carney
2004
73 Jack Markell Markell, JackJack Markell January 20, 2009

January 17, 2017
Democratic 2008 Denn, MatthewMatthew Denn
(resigned January 6, 2015)
2012
Vacant
74 John C. Carney Jr. official portrait 112th Congress Carney, JohnJohn Carney January 17, 2017

present
Democratic 2016
[u]
Hall-Long, BethanyBethany Hall-Long

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The office was named president until 1792.
  2. ^ The office of lieutenant governor was created in the 1897 constitution, with the first election taking place in 1900.
  3. ^ Lieutenant governors represented the same party as their governor unless noted.
  4. ^ McKinly was captured and taken prisoner by British forces.[12] He was exchanged for loyalist Governor William Franklin of New Jersey in August 1778.[13] Most sources do not specify the day McKinly was captured; at least one specifies that McKinly and the city of Wilmington were captured the day after the Battle of Brandywine, which was on September 11, 1777.[14] As Speaker of the Assembly, McKean acted as chief executive until the return of Speaker of the Legislative Council Read from the Continental Congress in Philadelphia, who then served as vice-president for the remainder of the term.[15]
  5. ^ Dickinson was elected President of Pennsylvania and took office November 7, 1782, holding both presidencies simultaneously. Criticism of this caused him to turn administration of the state over to Speaker of the Legislative Council Cook, but Dickinson didn't formally resign until January 12, 1783, whereupon Cook served as vice-president until a special election was held.[16]
  6. ^ Collins died in office; as speaker of the legislative council, Davis served as vice-president for the remainder of the term.
  7. ^ Bedford died in office; as speaker of the senate, Rogers acted as governor for the remainder of the term.
  8. ^ Bassett resigned to take a seat on the United States Third Circuit Court; as speaker of the senate, Sykes acted as governor for the remainder of the term.
  9. ^ Governor-elect Molleston died on November 11, 1819, before taking office. The newly elected state senate chose a speaker, Stout, who would act as governor for one year of Molleston's term before a special election was held to pick a governor for the remaining two years.[17] Collins was chosen in that special election, but died in office, and as speaker of the senate, Rodney acted as governor for the remainder of the term.
  10. ^ Haslet died in office; as speaker of the senate, Thomas acted as governor until a special election was held. There is disagreement over when Haslet died and Thomas became acting governor. Most modern sources say Haslet died on June 20, and Thomas became acting governor on June 23; however, some sources say Thomas became acting governor on June 20,[18] and others say Haslet died on June 23,[19] both situations meaning there was no gap in power. Because of the death of Haslet so early in his term, early elections were called. Unlike when elections were called due to Henry Molleston's death, where the election was only for the final two years of his term, in this case the new election was for a new three-year term, causing the election schedule to shift.[17]
  11. ^ Terms were lengthened from three to four years beginning with this term.
  12. ^ Bennett died in office; as speaker of the senate, Polk acted as governor for the remainder of the term.
  13. ^ Stockton died in office; as speaker of the senate, Maull acted as governor until he too died. The new speaker of the senate, Temple, acted as governor for the remainder of the term, which was shortened due to a new election schedule.
  14. ^ Cannon died in office; as speaker of the senate, Saulsbury acted as governor for the remainder of the term.
  15. ^ Marvil died in office; as speaker of the senate, Watson acted as governor for the remainder of the term. Because Marvil died so early in his term, the General Assembly decided to conduct an election for a full term in 1896, changing the election schedule.[20]
  16. ^ a b c d e f Represented the Democratic Party.
  17. ^ Boggs resigned to take an elected seat in the United States Senate; as lieutenant governor, Buckson succeeded him.
  18. ^ Represented the Republican Party.
  19. ^ Castle resigned to take an elected seat in the United States House of Representatives; as lieutenant governor, Wolf succeeded him.
  20. ^ Carper resigned to take an elected seat in the United States Senate; as lieutenant governor, Minner succeeded him.
  21. ^ Governor Carney's first term expires on January 19, 2021; he will not be term limited.

References

General
Constitutions
Specific
  1. ^ "CSG Releases 2013 Governor Salaries". The Council of State Governments. June 25, 2013. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
  2. ^ DE Const. art. III
  3. ^ DE Const. art. VII, § 1
  4. ^ 1776 Const. art 7
  5. ^ 1792 Const. art. III, § 1
  6. ^ 1792 Const. art. III, § 3
  7. ^ 1831 Const. art III, § 3
  8. ^ DE Const. art. III, § 5
  9. ^ 1776 Const. art. 7
  10. ^ DE Const. art. III, § 19
  11. ^ DE Const. art. III, § 20
  12. ^ McGuire, Thomas J. (2006). The Philadelphia Campaign. Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania: Stackpole Books. p. 278. ISBN 0-8117-0206-5.
  13. ^ Rowe, Gail Stuart (1978). Thomas McKean: The Shaping of an American Republicanism. p. 147. ISBN 0-87081-100-2.
  14. ^ Project, Delaware Federal Writers' (1938). Delaware: A Guide to the First State. p. 48. ISBN 978-1-60354-008-7. Retrieved August 4, 2010.
  15. ^ Conrad, Henry Clay (1908). History of the State of Delaware, Volume 3. p. 821. Retrieved October 25, 2009.
  16. ^ Conrad, Henry Clay. History of the State of Delaware, Volume 1. p. 153. Retrieved August 26, 2016.
  17. ^ a b Niles, H. (1824). Niles' Weekly Register. Volume I, Third Series. p. 121. ISBN 0-8371-3045-X. Retrieved October 25, 2009.
  18. ^ "Delaware". The Encyclopedia Americana. Volume. VIII. 1918. p. 614. Retrieved October 25, 2009.
  19. ^ Messersmith, George S. (1908). Government of Delaware. p. 283. Retrieved October 25, 2009.
  20. ^ "Delaware's Change in Elections". The New York Times. April 14, 1895. Retrieved October 25, 2009.
  21. ^ Thorpe pp. 582–600
  22. ^ Thorpe pp. 568–582

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