Elections in Jammu and Kashmir

Last updated on 22 January 2017

Elections in Jammu and Kashmir are conducted to elect members of Jammu and Kashmir Legislative Assembly and of Lok Sabha. There are 87 assembly constituencies and 6 Lok sabha constituencies.

Main Political Parties

Nationalist parties

MC: All Jammu and Kashmir Muslim Conference, founded in 1932, renamed JKNC in 1939
JKNC: Jammu & Kashmir National Conference, merged with INC in 1965
PC: Jammu & Kashmir Political Conference, separated from JKNC in 1947
PF: Jammu & Kashmir Plebiscite Front, founded in 1955, renamed as JKNC in 1977
ANC: Awami National Conference, break-away faction of JKNC, 1984-1986
INC: Indian National Congress
PDP: Jammu & Kashmir People's Democratic Party, split from INC in 1987

Hindu nationalist parties

PP: Jammu & Kashmir Praja Parishad, merged with BJS in 1963
BJS: Bharatiya Jana Sangh, merged into Janata Party in 1977, revived as BJP in 1980
Janata: Janata Party, formed in 1977, disintegrated in 1980
BJP: Bharatiya Janata Party

Muslim nationalist parties

Jamaat: Jamaat-e-Islami Kashmir, formed soon after 1947, contested elections since 1972 (under the MUF umbrella in 1987)[1]
MUF: Muslim United Front, a coalition of Muslim nationalist groups (Jamaat-e-Islami, Ummat-e-Islami, Anjunmane Ittehad-ul-Musalmeen) that contested elections in 1987.[2]

Others

PSP: Praja Socialist Party, 1953-1977, merging into the Janata Party in 1977
JD: Janata Dal
HM: Harijan Mandal, 1951-1972
Panthers: Jammu and Kashmir National Panthers Party, formed in 1982

Lok Sabha elections

After 1965

The first time that Jammu & Kashmir sent elected members to the Lok Sabha was in 1967.

  • 1967: Total: 6. INC: 5/6 [3]
  • 1971: Total: 6. INC: 5/6, Independent: 1
  • 1980: Total: 6. JKNC: 3, Congress(I): 1, Congress(U): 1
  • 2014: Total: 6. BJP: 3, PDP: 3, INC: 0, JKNC: 0

Legislative assembly elections

After the Constitution of Jammu and Kashmir amended, the name Prime Minister changed into Chief Minister.[4][5]

Year Election Chief Minister (Winning Party/Coalition) Seats Won Remarks
1951 Constituent Assembly Sheikh Abdullah (JKNC) 1951-1953 (dismissed)
Bakshi Ghulam Mohammad (JKNC) 1953-1957
Total: 75; JKNC: 75 Praja Parishad boycotted;
all seats unopposed[6]
1957 First Assembly Bakshi Ghulam Mohammad (JKNC) 1957-1962 Total: 75; JKNC: 69
PP: 5, HM: 1
47 seats unopposed[7]
1962 Second Assembly Bakshi Ghulam Mohammad (JKNC) 1962-1963
Khwaja Shamsuddin (JKNC) 1963-1964
Ghulam Mohammed Sadiq (JKNC) 1964-1972
Total: 74; JKNC: 68
PP: 3, independents: 3
33 seats unopposed;
allegations of malpractices[8]
1967 Third Assembly Ghulam Mohammed Sadiq (INC) Total: 75; INC: 60
39 seats unopposed;
118 candidates rejected[9]
1972 Fourth Assembly Syed Mir Qasim (INC) 1972-1975
Sheikh Abdullah 1975-1977
Total: 75; INC: 58
Jamaat: 5; BJS: 3
Plebiscite Front banned;
election malpractices[10]
1977 Fifth Assembly Sheikh Abdullah (JKNC) 1977-1982 (death)
Farooq Abdullah (JKNC) 1982-1983
Total: 76; JKNC: 47
INC: 11, Janata: 13
free and fair elections[11]
1983 Sixth Assembly Farooq Abdullah (JKNC) 1983-1984 (dismissed)
Ghulam Mohammad Shah (ANC) 1984-1986
Farooq Abdullah (JKNC) 1986-1987
Total: 76; JKNC: 46
INC: 26
INC engineered split in JKNC;
suppression of protests[12]
1987 Seventh Assembly Farooq Abdullah (JKNC) 1987-1990 (dismissed)
President's rule 1990-1996
Total: 76; JKNC: 40, INC: 26
MUF:4; BJP: 2
blatant rigging[2][13]
1996 Eighth Assembly Farooq Abdullah (JKNC) Total: 87; JKNC: 57
INC: 7; BJP: 8; JD: 5; BSP: 4
2002 Ninth Assembly Mufti Mohammad Sayeed (PDP) 2002-2005
Ghulam Nabi Azad (INC) 2005-2008
Total: 87; PDP: 16, INC: 20,
JKNC: 28, Panthers: 4
Independents: 13
2008 Tenth Assembly Omar Abdullah (JKNC) Total: 87; JKNC: 28, INC: 17
PDP: 21, BJP: 11
2014 Eleventh Assembly Mufti Mohammad Sayeed (PDP) 2014-2016 (death)
Mehbooba Mufti (PDP) 2016-
Total: 87; PDP: 28; BJP: 25
JKNC: 15; INC: 12

References

  1. ^ Bose 2003, p. 99.
  2. ^ a b Behera 2007, p. 47.
  3. ^ "Lok Sabha Results 1967". Election Commission of India.
  4. ^ "From 1965 to 2009, Omar Abdullah is the eighth chief minister". Hindustan Times. 5 January 2009. Archived from the original on 23 December 2013. Retrieved 8 December 2013.
  5. ^ Mayilvaganan (10 April 2002). "A Survey of Elections in Kashmir". IPCS. Retrieved 8 December 2013.
  6. ^ Bose 2003, pp. 55-57.
  7. ^ Bose 2003, p. 75.
  8. ^ Bose 2003, pp. 77-78.
  9. ^ Bose 2003, p. 85.
  10. ^ Bose 2003, pp. 86-89.
  11. ^ Bose 2003, pp. 89-90.
  12. ^ Bose 2003, pp. 91-93.
  13. ^ Bose 2003, pp. 47-50, 94.

Bibliography

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