Dugald, Manitoba

Last updated on 14 September 2017

Dugald is a community in Manitoba, Canada, located 22 kilometers east of Winnipeg at the junction of PTH 15 and Provincial Road 206 in the Rural Municipality of Springfield. It was the site of a railway accident in 1947.

In the Dugald train disaster of September 1947, a Canadian National Railway passenger train consisting of older wooden-bodied passenger cars collided with a transcontinental passenger train made up of newer steel cars, resulting in severe damage and fatalities on the older train. This accident led to the retirement of the less crashworthy wooden cars.[2][3]

Dugald was also the home to the Costume Museum, a museum dedicated to Canadian fashion. The museum relocated to downtown Winnipeg in 2006.[4][5]

Dugald is the birthplace of former National Hockey League goaltender Trevor Kidd, who played in 387 regular season games for four teams.[6]

Dugald
Canada Manitoba location map 2.svg
Dugald
Dugald
Location of Dugald in Manitoba
Coordinates: 49°53′08″N 96°50′21″W / 49.88556°N 96.83917°W / 49.88556; -96.83917Coordinates: 49°53′08″N 96°50′21″W / 49.88556°N 96.83917°W / 49.88556; -96.83917
Country Canada
Province Manitoba
Region Eastman
Rural Municipality R.M. of Springfield
Government
 • MP (Provencher) Ted Falk (CPC)
 • MLA (St. Paul) Ron Schuler (PC)
Area
 • Land 3.02 km2 (1.17 sq mi)
Population (2016)
 • Total 560
 • Density 192.2/km2 (498/sq mi)
  [1]
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Postal code span R0E 0K0
Area code(s) 204
Website https://web.archive.org/web/20130907061823/http://dugaldmb.ca/index.htm

References

  1. ^ "Dugald census profile". Census Canada. Retrieved 2017-08-07.
  2. ^ "10 of Canada's worst train accidents". McLean's Magazine. July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ "The Dugald Train Disaster, 1947". Manitoba Historical Society. Retrieved October 24, 2014.
  4. ^ "Dugald Costume Museum Opens". Manitoba Historical Society. Retrieved October 24, 2014.
  5. ^ "Costume Museum of Canada moves to Winnipeg". CBC.ca. December 11, 2006.
  6. ^ "Canada' Small Town Players". The Globe and Mail. December 28, 2007.

See also

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