110th United States Congress

Last updated on 13 June 2017

The One Hundred Tenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, between January 3, 2007, and January 3, 2009, during the last two years of the second term of President George W. Bush. It was composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives. The apportionment of seats in the House was based on the 2000 U.S. census.

The Democratic Party controlled a majority in both chambers for the first time since the end of the 103rd Congress in 1995. Although the Democrats held fewer than 50 Senate seats, they had an operational majority because the two independent senators caucused with the Democrats for organizational purposes. No Democratic-held seats had fallen to the Republican Party in the 2006 elections.[2] Democrat Nancy Pelosi became the first woman Speaker of the House.[3] The House also received the first Muslim (Keith Ellison)[4][5] and Buddhist (Hank Johnson and Mazie Hirono)[6] members of Congress.

Capitol Building Full View.jpg
Capitol Building Full View.jpg

Major events

Members debated initiatives such as the Democrats' 100-Hour Plan and the Iraq War troop surge of 2007.[7][8][9]

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President Bush delivered the 2007 State of the Union Address on January 23, 2007
2008 State of the Union Address.jpg
President Bush delivered the 2008 State of the Union Address on January 28, 2008

Support for the Iraq War

Following President Bush's 2007 State of the Union Address, Congress debated his proposal to create a troop surge to increase security in Iraq. The House of Representatives passed a non-binding measure opposing the surge and then a $124 billion emergency spending measure to fund the war, which included language that dictated troop levels and withdrawal schedules. President Bush, however, vetoed the bill as promised, making this his second veto while in office. Both houses of Congress subsequently passed a bill funding the war without timelines, but with benchmarks for the Iraqi government and money for other spending projects like disaster relief.

Other events

Major legislation

These are partial lists of prominent enacted legislation and pending bills.

See also: 2008 Congressional Record, Vol. 154, Page D845 , Resume of Congressional Activity

Enacted

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House in Salinas, California under foreclosure, following the bursting of the U.S. real estate bubble.

More information: Public Laws for the 110th Congress and Complete index of Public and Private Laws for 110th Congress at GPO

Proposed, but not enacted

in (alphabetical order)

Vetoed

Treaties ratified

Select committees

Hearings

Party summary

Senate

Senado Estados Unidos 2007 en.svg
  Democratic Party: 49 members.
  Republican Party: 49 members.
  Independents: 2 members.

Membership changed with one death and two resignations.

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Independent Republican Vacant
End of previous Congress 44 1 55 100 0
Begin 49 2[12][13] 49 100 0
June 4, 2007 48 99 1
June 25, 2007 49 100 0
December 18, 2007 48 99 1
December 31, 2007 49 100 0
November 16, 2008 48 99 1
Final voting share 50.5% 49.5%
Beginning of the next Congress 55 2 41 98 2

House of Representatives

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Membership at the beginning of the 110th Congress:
  Democratic Party: 233 members.
  Republican Party: 202 members.

Membership fluctuated with seven deaths and eight resignations. Democrats achieved a net gain of three seats as a result of their victories in special elections. See Changes in membership, below.

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Republican Vacant
End of previous Congress 203[14] 229 432 3
Begin 233 202 435 0
February 13, 2007 201 434 1
April 22, 2007 232 433 2
July 1, 2007 231 432 3
July 17, 2007 202 433 2
August 21, 2007 232 434 1
September 5, 2007 201 433 2
October 10, 2007 200 432 3
October 16, 2007 233 433 2
November 26, 2007 199 432 3
December 11, 2007 201 434 1
December 15, 2007 232 433 2
December 31, 2007 200 432 3
January 14, 2008 199 431 4
February 2, 2008 198 430 5
February 11, 2008 231 429 6
March 8, 2008 232 430 5
March 11, 2008 233 431 4
April 8, 2008 234 432 3
May 3, 2008 235 199 434 1
May 13, 2008 236 435 0
May 31, 2008 235 434 1
June 17, 2008 236 435 0
August 20, 2008 235 434 1
November 18, 2008 236 435 0
November 24, 2008 198 434 1
January 2, 2009 235 433 2
Final voting share 54.3% 45.7%
Non-voting members 4 1 5 0
Beginning of next Congress 256 178 434 1

Leadership

[ Section contents: Senate: Majority (D), Minority (R)House: Majority (D), Minority (R) ]

Senate

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Senate President
Dick Cheney (R)
Robert Byrd official portrait.jpg
Senate President pro tempore
Robert Byrd (D)

Majority (Democratic) leadership

Minority (Republican) leadership

House of Representatives

Speaker Nancy Pelosi.jpg
House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi (D)

Majority (Democratic) leadership

Minority (Republican) leadership

Members

Senate

Senators are listed by state, then by class, In this Congress, Class 2 meant their term ended with this Congress, requiring reelection in 2008; Class 3 meant their term began in the last Congress, requiring reelection in 2010; and Class 1 meant their term began in this Congress, requiring reelection in 2012.

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Senators' party membership by state at the opening of the 110th Congress in January 2007
  2 Democrats
  1 Democrat and 1 Republican
  2 Republicans
   1 Independent and 1 Democrat
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Senators in the 110th Congress
Harry Reid official portrait 2009 crop.jpg
Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid (D)
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Senate Minority Leader
Mitch McConnell (R)
Richard Durbin official photo.jpg
Senate Majority Whip
Dick Durbin (D)
Trent Lott official portrait.jpg
Senate Minority Whip, until December 18, 2007
Trent Lott (R)
Jon Kyl, official 109th Congress photo.jpg
Senate Minority Whip, from December 18, 2007
Jon Kyl (R)

House of Representatives

110th US Congress House of Reps.svg
Initial percentage of members of the House of Representatives from each party by state at the opening of the 110th Congress in January 2007.
Steny Hoyer, official photo portrait, 2008.jpg
House Majority Leader
Steny Hoyer (D)
John-Boehner.png
House Minority Leader
John Boehner (R)
James Clyburn, official Congressional Majority Whip photo.jpg
House Majority Whip
Jim Clyburn (D)
Rep Roy Blunt.jpg
House Minority Whip
Roy Blunt (R)

Changes in membership

Senate

There were two resignations and one death.

State
(class)
Vacator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation
Wyoming (1) Craig Thomas (R) Died June 4, 2007 John Barrasso (R) June 22, 2007[19]
Mississippi (1) Trent Lott (R) Resigned December 18, 2007[17] Roger Wicker (R) December 31, 2007[18][19]
Illinois (3) Barack Obama (D) Resigned November 16, 2008 to focus on his transition as President-elect of the United States[21] Vacant until the next Congress

House of Representatives

District Vacator Reason for change Successor Date successor
seated
Georgia 10th Charlie Norwood (R) Died February 13, 2007. A special election was held June 19, 2007 Paul Broun (R) July 17, 2007
California 37th Juanita Millender-McDonald (D) Died April 22, 2007[22] A special election was held August 21, 2007 Laura Richardson (D) August 21, 2007
Massachusetts 5th Marty Meehan (D) Resigned July 1, 2007, to become Chancellor of University of Massachusetts Lowell. A special election was held October 16, 2007 Niki Tsongas (D) October 16, 2007
Ohio 5th Paul Gillmor (R) Died September 5, 2007. A special election was held November 6, 2007 Bob Latta (R) December 11, 2007
Virginia 1st Jo Ann Davis (R) Died October 6, 2007. A special election was held December 11, 2007 Rob Wittman (R) December 11, 2007
Illinois 14th Dennis Hastert (R) Resigned November 26, 2007. A special election was held March 8, 2008 Bill Foster (D) March 8, 2008
Indiana 7th Julia Carson (D) Died December 15, 2007. A special election was held March 11, 2008 André Carson (D) March 11, 2008
Mississippi 1st Roger Wicker (R) Resigned December 31, 2007, when appointed U.S. Senator. A special election was held May 13, 2008 Travis Childers (D) May 13, 2008
Louisiana 1st Bobby Jindal (R) Resigned January 14, 2008 to become Governor of Louisiana. A special election was held May 3, 2008 Steve Scalise (R) May 3, 2008
Louisiana 6th Richard Baker (R) Resigned February 2, 2008 to become President of the Managed Funds Association. A special election was held May 3, 2008 Don Cazayoux (D) May 3, 2008
California 12th Tom Lantos (D) Died February 11, 2008. A special election was held April 8, 2008 Jackie Speier (D) April 8, 2008
Maryland 4th Albert Wynn (D) Resigned May 31, 2008, having lost re-nomination. A special election was held June 17, 2008 Donna Edwards (D) June 17, 2008
Ohio 11th Stephanie Tubbs Jones (D) Died August 20, 2008. A special election was held November 18, 2008 Marcia Fudge (D) November 18, 2008
Virginia 11th Thomas M. Davis (R) Resigned November 24, 2008[23] in advance of his retirement. Vacant until the next Congress
Illinois 5th Rahm Emanuel (D) Resigned January 2, 2009 to become White House Chief of Staff[20]
Puerto Rico At-large Luis Fortuño (R and PNP) Resigned January 2, 2009 to become Governor of Puerto Rico

Committees

Lists of committees and their party leaders, for members (House and Senate) of the committees and their assignments, go into the Official Congressional Directory at the bottom of the article and click on the link (1 link), in the directory after the pages of terms of service, you will see the committees of the Senate, House (Standing with Subcommittees, Select and Special) and Joint and after the committee pages, you will see the House/Senate committee assignments in the directory, on the committees section of the House and Senate in the Official Congressional Directory, the committee's members on the first row on the left side shows the chairman of the committee and on the right side shows the ranking member of the committee.

Senate

House of Representatives

Joint committees

Caucuses

  • Anti-Value Added Tax Caucus
  • Afterschool Caucus
  • Americans Aboard Caucus
  • Armenian Caucus
  • Army Corps Reform Caucus
  • Appalachian Caucus
  • Bipartisan Disabilities Caucus
  • Biomedical Research Caucus
  • Building a Better America Caucus
  • Coalition for Autism Research and Education
  • Congressional 4-H Caucus
  • Congressional Addiction, Treatment and Recovery Caucus
  • Congressional Air Force Caucus
  • Congressional Anti-Terrorism Caucus
  • Congressional Arts Caucus
  • Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus
  • Congressional Assyrian Caucus
  • Congressional Automotive Caucus
  • Congressional Azerbaijan Caucus
  • Congressional Battlefield Caucus
  • Congressional Bike Caucus
  • Congressional Bipartisan Cerebral Palsy Caucus
  • Congressional Biotechnology Caucus
  • Congressional Black Caucus
  • Congressional Boating Caucus
  • Congressional Border Caucus
  • Congressional Bourbon Caucus
  • Congressional Brazil Caucus
  • Congressional Career and Technical Education Caucus
  • Congressional Caucus for Bosnia
  • Congressional Caucus on Armenian Issues
  • Congressional Caucus on Central America
  • Congressional Caucus on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
  • Congressional Caucus on Hellenic Issues
  • Congressional Caucus on India and Indian Americans
  • Congressional Caucus on Intellectual Property Promotion and Piracy Prevention
  • Congressional Caucus on the Judicial Branch
  • Congressional Caucus on Korea
  • Congressional Caucus on the Netherlands
  • Congressional Caucus on Sri Lanka and Sri Lankan Americans
  • Congressional Caucus on Uganda
  • Congressional Caucus on U.S.-Lebanon Relations
  • Congressional Caucus on Youth Sports
  • Congressional Caucus to Fight and Control Methamphetamine
  • Congressional Children's Caucus
  • Congressional China Caucus
  • Congressional Climate Caucus
  • Congressional Coastal Caucus
  • Congressional Coast Guard Caucus
  • Congressional Complementary and Alternative Medicine Caucus
  • Congressional Constitution Caucus
  • Congressional Correctional Officers Caucus
  • Congressional Croatian Caucus
  • Congressional Cystic Fibrosis Caucus
  • Congressional Czech Caucus
  • Congressional Diabetes Caucus
  • Congressional Dietary Supplement Caucus
  • Congressional Emergency Medical Services Caucus
  • Congressional Entertainment Industries Caucus
  • Congressional Ethiopian-American Caucus
  • Congressional Explosive Ordnance Disposal Caucus
  • Congressional E-911 Caucus
  • Congressional Farmer Cooperative Caucus
  • Congressional Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus
  • Congressional Fire Services Caucus
  • Congressional Fitness Caucus
  • Congressional Food Safety Caucus
  • Congressional Former Mayors Caucus
  • Congressional Friends of Ireland Caucus
  • Congressional Friends of Jordan Caucus
  • Congressional Friends of New Zealand Caucus
  • Congressional French Caucus
  • Congressional Global Health Caucus
  • Congressional Green Schools Caucus
  • Congressional Gulf of Mexico Caucus
  • Congressional Hearing Health Caucus
  • Congressional High Tech Caucus
  • Congressional Hispanic Caucus
  • Congressional Horse Caucus
  • Congressional House Manufacturing Caucus
  • Congressional HUBZone Caucus
  • Congressional Human Rights Caucus
  • Congressional Humanities Caucus
  • Congressional Immigration Reform Caucus
  • Congressional Insurance Caucus
  • Congressional Intelligent Transportation Systems Caucus
  • Congressional International Anti-Piracy Caucus
  • Congressional International Conservation Caucus
  • Congressional International Religious Freedom Caucus
  • Congressional Internet Caucus
  • Congressional Iraqi Women's Caucus
  • Congressional Israel Allies Caucus
  • Congressional Kidney Caucus
  • Congressional Labor and Working Families Caucus
  • Congressional Life Science Caucus
  • Congressional Management Caucus
  • Congressional Manufacturing Caucus
  • Congressional Medical Professionals Caucus
  • Congressional Men's Health Caucus
  • Congressional Mental Health Caucus
  • Congressional Mentoring Caucus
  • Congressional Mine Warfare Caucus
  • Congressional Mining Caucus
  • Congressional Missing and Exploited Children's Caucus
  • Congressional Mississippi River Caucus
  • Congressional Modeling and Simulation Caucus
  • Congressional Motorsports Caucus
  • Congressional Multiple Sclerosis Caucus
  • Congressional Nursing Caucus
  • Congressional Organic Caucus
  • Congressional Out of Poverty Caucus
  • Congressional Pakistan Caucus
  • Congressional Pediatric & Adult Hydrocephalus Caucus
  • Congressional Port Security Caucus
  • Congressional Portuguese-American Caucus
  • Congressional Prayer Caucus
  • Congressional Progressive Caucus
  • Congressional Real Estate Caucus
  • Congressional Rural Caucus
  • Congressional Rural Housing Caucus
  • Congressional Savings and Ownership Caucus
  • Congressional Scouting Caucus
  • Congressional Second Amendment Caucus
  • Congressional Serbian Caucus
  • Congressional Shipbuilding Caucus
  • Congressional Singapore Caucus
  • Congressional Ski and Snowboard Caucus
  • Congressional Smart Contracting Caucus
  • Congressional Soccer Caucus
  • Congressional Songwriters Caucus
  • Congressional Spina Bifida Caucus
  • Congressional Sportsmen's Caucus
  • Congressional Steel Caucus
  • Congressional Stop DUI Caucus
  • Congressional Submarine Caucus
  • Congressional Taiwan Caucus
  • Congressional Tibet Caucus
  • Congressional Travel & Tourism Caucus
  • Congressional TRIO Caucus
  • Congressional United Kingdom Caucus
  • Congressional Urban Caucus
  • Congressional Victim's Rights Caucus
  • Congressional Vision Caucus
  • Congressional Waterways Caucus
  • Congressional Western Caucus
  • Congressional Wildlife Refuge Caucus
  • Congressional Wine Caucus
  • Congresswomen's Caucus
  • Congressional Zoo and Aquarium Caucus
  • Diversity and Innovation Caucus
  • Economic Competitiveness Caucus (House/Senate)
  • Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus
  • Friends of Job Corps Congressional Caucus
  • Friends of Scotland Caucus (House)
  • Friends of Norway Caucus
  • Friends of Switzerland Caucus
  • Future of American Media Caucus
  • Historic Preservation Caucus
  • Hong Kong Caucus
  • House Baltic Caucus
  • House Democratic Caucus
  • House Oceans Caucus
  • House Organic Caucus
  • House Recycling Caucus
  • House Rural Education Caucus
  • House Small Brewers Caucus
  • House Sugar Caucus
  • Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Caucus
  • Hudson River Caucus
  • Hungarian American Caucus
  • India Caucus
  • Indonesia Caucus
  • International Conservation Caucus
  • International Workers Rights Caucus
  • Interstate 69 Caucus
  • Intelligent Transportation Caucus
  • Kenya Caucus
  • Law Enforcement Caucus
  • LGBT Equality Caucus
  • Liberty Caucus
  • Multiple Sclerosis Caucus
  • National Guard and Reserve Components Caucus
  • National Landscape Conservation System Caucus
  • National Marine Sanctuary Caucus
  • National Service Congressional Caucus
  • Navy-Marine Corps Caucus
  • New Democrat Coalition
  • North America's Supercorridor Caucus
  • Northern Border Caucus
  • Northeast-Midwest Congressional Coalition
  • Nuclear Issues Caucus
  • Out of Iraq Caucus
  • Passenger Rail Caucus
  • Patriot Act Reform Caucus
  • Pell Grant Caucus
  • Physics Caucus
  • Ports Caucus
  • Public Broadcasting Caucus
  • Public Service Caucus
  • Qatari-American Economic Strategic Defense, Cultural and Educational Partnership Caucus
  • Recording Arts and Sciences Congressional Caucus
  • Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Caucus
  • Research and Development Caucus
  • River of Trade Corridor Congressional Caucus
  • Sex and Violence in the Media Caucus
  • Shellfish Caucus
  • Silk Road Caucus
  • Special Operations Forces Caucus
  • State Maritime Academy Caucus
  • Sudan Caucus
  • TEX-21 Congressional Caucus
  • Unexploded Ordnance Caucus
  • U.S.-Afghan Caucus
  • U.S.-Mongolia Friendship Caucus
  • U.S.-New Zealand Congressional Caucus
  • Victory in Iraq Caucus
  • Youth Challenge Caucus
  • Zero Capital Gains Tax Caucus

Employees and legislative agency directors

Legislative branch agency directors

Senate

House of Representatives

See also: Rules of the House: "Other officers and officials"

See also

Bush, Pelosi, and Hoyer meeting at White House, Nov 9, 2006.jpg
Prospective Speaker Nancy Pelosi and prospective House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer meet with President George W. Bush on November 9, 2006, after the election to this Congress

Membership lists

References

  1. ^ Legislative Activities, via clerk.house.gov. Accessed April 25, 2009. Archived 2009-04-29.
  2. ^ CBS News, Voters Usher Out Republicans
  3. ^ Deirdre Walsh (January 4, 2007). "Pelosi becomes first woman House speaker". CNN.com. Archived from the original on January 6, 2007. Retrieved January 4, 2007.
  4. ^ ruthholladay.com - Andre Carson on identity and belief Archived April 30, 2008, at the Wayback Machine.
  5. ^ DAWN (Newspaper) Archived October 26, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.
  6. ^ Nash, Phil Tajitsu (November 24, 2006). "Washington Journal: Campaign 2006 In Review". AsianWeek. Archived from the original on November 21, 2007. Retrieved December 16, 2006.
  7. ^ Espa, David (October 6, 2006). "Pelosi Says She Would Drain GOP 'Swamp'". The Washington Post. Associated Press. Retrieved January 2, 2007.
  8. ^ Talev, Margaret (December 29, 2006). "Democratic majority to focus on 3-pronged plan". McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. Archived from the original on March 8, 2007. Retrieved January 2, 2007.
  9. ^ Leader Staff Dennis Kucinich's Response To President Bush's Speech Archived September 27, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. January 11, 2007 Cleveland Leader. Retrieved January 13, 2007
  10. ^ Jackie Kucinich (September 28, 2007). "Select committee on 'stolen vote' issues findings". The Hill. Retrieved May 13, 2008.
  11. ^ Bill Scher (December 19, 2007). "Record-Breaking Obstruction:How It Screwed You". Huffington Post. Retrieved December 24, 2007.; "Record-Breaking Republican Obstructionism". Campaign for America's Future. Archived from the original on November 29, 2008. Retrieved January 6, 2009.;"Senate Action on Cloture Motions". Retrieved October 22, 2012.
  12. ^ Senators of the 110th Congress "Lieberman, Joseph I." Archived December 27, 2006, at the Wayback Machine. United States Senate. Retrieved January 8, 2007
  13. ^ Martin Kady II (November 15, 2006). "For Those of You Keeping Track at Home, It's Official ...". Congressional Quarterly. Retrieved November 20, 2006.
  14. ^ Including one Independent who caucused with the Democrats
  15. ^ The Vice President of the United States serves as the President of the Senate. See U.S. Constitution, Article I, Section 3, Clause 4
  16. ^ The Democratic Senate Majority Leader also serves as the Chairman of the Democratic Conference.
  17. ^ a b "Lott Officially Resigns, All Eyes Now on Barbour". Archived from the original on July 21, 2009. Retrieved July 1, 2009.
  18. ^ a b "Rep. Wicker Is Barbour's Choice". Washington Post. Archived from the original on May 23, 2011. Retrieved December 31, 2007.
  19. ^ a b c Senators of the United States 1789–2007: A Chronological list of Senators from the First Congress to the 111th Congress
  20. ^ a b Rahm Emanuel's resignation announcement, via Yahoo.com
  21. ^ "Obama will resign Senate seat Sunday". Chicago Trubune. November 13, 2008. Retrieved April 25, 2009.
  22. ^ Rep. Millender-McDonald Dies of Cancer. Washington Post, April 22, 2007
  23. ^ List of Vacancies, via Clerk.House.gov
  24. ^ Although called a "caucus", it has the rank of committee.
  25. ^ S.Res. 424, Electing Lula Johnson Davis Secretary for the Majority of the Senate
  26. ^ a b Election of Clerk of the House and Chief Administrative Officer 2007 Congressional Record, Vol. 153, Page H1671

External links

Content from Wikipedia