109th United States Congress

Last updated on 7 July 2017

The One Hundred Ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, from January 3, 2005 to January 3, 2007, during the fifth and sixth years of George W. Bush's presidency. House members were elected in the 2004 elections on November 2, 2004. Senators were elected in three classes in the 2000 elections on November 7, 2000, 2002 elections on November 5, 2002, or 2004 elections on November 2, 2004. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twenty-second Census of the United States in 2000. Both chambers had a Republican majority, the same party as President Bush.

Dennis Hastert 2.jpg
Dennis Hastert 2.jpg

Major events

Major legislation

Enacted

With Sen. Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) looking on, President George W. Bush signs into law S-3728, the North Korea Nonproliferation Act of 2006, Friday, Oct. 13, 2006, in the Oval Office.jpg
With Sen. Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) looking on, President George W. Bush signs into law Pub.L. 109–353, the North Korea Nonproliferation Act of 2006, on October 13, 2006.

Proposed, but not enacted

More information: Complete index of Public and Private Laws for 109th Congress at U.S. Government Printing Office

Hearings

  • Congressional response to the NSA warrantless surveillance program (Senate Judiciary; House Intelligence; Democrats of the House Judiciary)

Party summary

Senate

109senate.svg
Party standings in the Senate during the 109th Congress
  44 Democratic Senators
  1 Independent Senator, caucusing with Democrats
  55 Republican Senators

The party summary for the Senate remained the same during the entire 109th Congress. On January 16, 2006, Democrat Jon Corzine resigned, but Democrat Bob Menendez was appointed and took Corzine's seat the next day.

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Independent Republican Vacant
End of previous Congress 48 1 51 100 0
Entire Congress 44 1 55 100 0
Final voting share 45% 55%
Beginning of the next Congress 49 2 49 100 0

House of Representatives

Due to resignations and special elections, Republicans lost a net of three seats; Democrats gained one seat; three seats were left vacant; and one seat which was vacant at the beginning of the Congress was filled. All seats were filled though special elections. (See Changes in membership, below.)

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Independent Republican Vacant
End of previous Congress 207 1 225 433 2
Begin 201 1 232 434 1
March 10, 2005 202 435 0
April 29, 2005 231 434 1
August 2, 2005 230 433 2
September 6, 2005 231 434 1
December 1, 2005 230 433 2
December 7, 2005 231 434 1
January 16, 2006 201 433 2
June 9, 2006 230 432 3
June 13, 2006 231 433 2
September 29, 2006 230 432 3
November 3, 2006 229 431 4
November 13, 2006 202 230 433 2
December 31, 2006 229 432 3
Final voting share 47.0% 53.0%
Non-voting members 4 1 0 5 0
Beginning of next Congress 233 0 202 435 0

Leadership

[ Section contents: Senate: Majority (R), Minority (D)House: Majority (R), Minority (D) ]

Senate

46 Dick Cheney 3x4.jpg
Senate President
Dick Cheney (R)
Ted Stevens.jpg
Senate President pro tempore
Ted Stevens (R)

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

House of Representatives

SpeakerHastert.jpg
House Speaker
Dennis Hastert (R)

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

Members

Senate

In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term ended with this Congress, requiring reelection in 2006; Class 2 meant their term began in the last Congress, requiring reelection in 2008; and Class 3 meant their term began in this Congress, requiring reelection in 2010.

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

House of Representatives

109th US congress house of reps.svg
Initial percentage of members of the House of Representatives from each party by state at the opening of the 109th Congress in January 2005

The names of members of the House of Representatives are preceded by their district numbers.

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

Non-voting members

Changes in membership

Members who came and left during this Congress.

Senate

State
(class)
Vacator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation
New Jersey
(1)
Jon Corzine (D) Corzine resigned to become Governor of New Jersey on January 17, 2006. Bob Menendez (D) January 18, 2006
Connecticut
(1)
Joseph Lieberman (D) Change of party affiliation Joseph Lieberman (ID) August 9, 2006

House of Representatives

District Vacator Reason for change Successor Date successor
seated
California 5th None Representative Bob Matsui (D) died January 1, 2005 — before the end of the previous Congress. A special election was held March 8, 2005 Doris Matsui (D) March 10, 2005
Ohio 2nd Rob Portman (R) Resigned April 29, 2005 to become the United States Trade Representative. A special election was held August 2, 2005 Jean Schmidt (R) September 6, 2005[9]
California 48th Christopher Cox (R) Resigned August 2, 2005 to become chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. A special election was held December 6, 2005 John Campbell (R) December 7, 2005[10]
California 50th Duke Cunningham (R) Resigned December 1, 2005 after pleading guilty to conspiracy for bribes and tax evasion. A special election was held June 6, 2006 Brian Bilbray (R) June 13, 2006[11]
New Jersey 13th Bob Menendez (D) Resigned January 16, 2006 to become a U.S. Senator. A special election was held November 7, 2006 Albio Sires (D) November 13, 2006[12]
Texas 22nd Tom DeLay (R) Resigned June 9, 2006 after a series of criminal indictments. A special election was held November 6, 2006 Shelley Sekula-Gibbs (R) November 13, 2006[13]
Florida 16th Mark Foley (R) Resigned September 29, 2006 after a teen sex scandal. Remained vacant until the next Congress.[14]
Ohio 18th Bob Ney (R) Resigned November 3, 2006 after pleading guilty to conspiracy. Remained vacant until the next Congress.
Nevada 2nd Jim Gibbons (R) Resigned December 31, 2006 to become Governor of Nevada. Remained vacant until the next Congress.

Committees

Lists of committees and their party leaders, for members (House and Senate) of the committees and their assignments, go into the Official Congressional Directory at the bottom of the article and click on the link (1 link), in the directory after the pages of terms of service, you will see the committees of the Senate, House (Standing with Subcommittees, Select and Special) and Joint and after the committee pages, you will see the House/Senate committee assignments in the directory, on the committees section of the House and Senate in the Official Congressional Directory, the committee's members on the first row on the left side shows the chairman of the committee and on the right side shows the ranking member of the committee.

Senate

House of Representatives

Joint committees

Caucuses

  • Anti-Value Added Tax Caucus
  • Afterschool Caucus
  • Americans Aboard Caucus
  • Armenian Caucus
  • Army Corps Reform Caucus
  • Appalachian Caucus
  • Bipartisan Disabilities Caucus
  • Biomedical Research Caucus
  • Building a Better America Caucus
  • Coalition for Autism Research and Education
  • Congressional 4-H Caucus
  • Congressional Addiction, Treatment and Recovery Caucus
  • Congressional Air Force Caucus
  • Congressional Arts Caucus
  • Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus
  • Congressional Assyrian Caucus
  • Congressional Automotive Caucus
  • Congressional Azerbaijan Caucus
  • Congressional Battlefield Caucus
  • Congressional Bike Caucus
  • Congressional Bipartisan Cerebral Palsy Caucus
  • Congressional Biotechnology Caucus
  • Congressional Black Caucus
  • Congressional Boating Caucus
  • Congressional Border Caucus
  • Congressional Bourbon Caucus
  • Congressional Brazil Caucus
  • Congressional Caucus for Bosnia
  • Congressional Caucus on Armenian Issues
  • Congressional Caucus on Central America
  • Congressional Caucus on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
  • Congressional Caucus on Global Road Safety
  • Congressional Caucus on Hellenic Issues
  • Congressional Caucus on India and Indian Americans
  • Congressional Caucus on Intellectual Property Promotion and Piracy Prevention
  • Congressional Caucus on the Judicial Branch
  • Congressional Caucus on Korea
  • Congressional Caucus on the Netherlands
  • Congressional Caucus on Sri Lanka and Sri Lankan Americans
  • Congressional Caucus on Uganda
  • Congressional Caucus on U.S.-Lebanon Relations
  • Congressional Caucus on Youth Sports
  • Congressional Caucus to Fight and Control Methamphetamine
  • Congressional Children's Caucus
  • Congressional China Caucus
  • Congressional Climate Caucus
  • Congressional Coastal Caucus
  • Congressional Coast Guard Caucus
  • Congressional Complementary and Alternative Medicine Caucus
  • Congressional Constitution Caucus
  • Congressional Correctional Officers Caucus
  • Congressional Croatian Caucus
  • Congressional Cystic Fibrosis Caucus
  • Congressional Diabetes Caucus
  • Congressional Dietary Supplement Caucus
  • Congressional Entertainment Industries Caucus
  • Congressional Ethiopian-American Caucus
  • Congressional E-911 Caucus
  • Congressional Farmer Cooperative Caucus
  • Congressional Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus
  • Congressional Fitness Caucus
  • Congressional Fire Services Caucus
  • Congressional Friends of Ireland Caucus
  • Congressional Friends of New Zealand Caucus
  • Congressional Food Safety Caucus
  • Congressional Former Mayors Caucus
  • Congressional French Caucus
  • Congressional Global Health Caucus
  • Congressional Gulf of Mexico Caucus
  • Congressional Hearing Health Caucus
  • Congressional High Tech Caucus
  • Congressional Hispanic Caucus
  • Congressional Horse Caucus
  • Congressional House Manufacturing Caucus
  • Congressional HUBZone Caucus
  • Congressional Human Rights Caucus
  • Congressional Humanities Caucus
  • Congressional International Religious Freedom Caucus
  • Congressional Immigration Reform Caucus
  • Congressional Insurance Caucus
  • Congressional Intelligent Transportation Systems Caucus
  • Congressional International Anti-Piracy Caucus
  • Congressional International Conservation Caucus
  • Congressional Internet Caucus
  • Congressional Iraqi Women's Caucus
  • Congressional Israel Allies Caucus
  • Congressional Kidney Caucus
  • Congressional Labor and Working Families Caucus
  • Congressional Life Science Caucus
  • Congressional Management Caucus
  • Congressional Manufacturing Caucus
  • Congressional Medical Professionals Caucus
  • Congressional Mental Health Caucus
  • Congressional Mentoring Caucus
  • Congressional Mine Warfare Caucus
  • Congressional Mining Caucus
  • Congressional Missing and Exploited Children's Caucus
  • Congressional Mississippi River Caucus
  • Congressional Modeling and Simulation Caucus
  • Congressional Motorsports Caucus
  • Congressional Nursing Caucus
  • Congressional Organic Caucus
  • Congressional Out of Poverty Caucus
  • Congressional Pakistan Caucus
  • Congressional Pediatric & Adult Hydrocephalus Caucus
  • Congressional Port Security Caucus
  • Congressional Portuguese-American Caucus
  • Congressional Prayer Caucus
  • Congressional Progressive Caucus
  • Congressional Real Estate Caucus
  • Congressional Rural Caucus
  • Congressional Rural Housing Caucus
  • Congressional Savings and Ownership Caucus
  • Congressional Scouting Caucus
  • Congressional Second Amendment Caucus
  • Congressional Serbian Caucus
  • Congressional Shipbuilding Caucus
  • Congressional Singapore Caucus
  • Congressional Ski and Snowboard Caucus
  • Congressional Soccer Caucus
  • Congressional Songwriters Caucus
  • Congressional Spina Bifida Caucus
  • Congressional Sportsmen's Caucus
  • Congressional Steel Caucus
  • Congressional Stop DUI Caucus
  • Congressional Submarine Caucus
  • Congressional Taiwan Caucus
  • Congressional Travel & Tourism Caucus
  • Congressional TRIO Caucus
  • Congressional United Kingdom Caucus
  • Congressional Victim's Rights Caucus
  • Congressional Vision Caucus
  • Congressional Waterways Caucus
  • Congressional Western Caucus
  • Congressional Wine Caucus
  • Congressional Wildlife Refuge Caucus
  • Congresswomen's Caucus
  • Congressional Zoo and Aquarium Caucus
  • Economic Competitiveness Caucus (House/Senate)
  • Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus
  • Friends of Job Corps Congressional Caucus
  • Friends of Scotland Caucus (House)
  • Future of American Media Caucus
  • Historic Preservation Caucus
  • Hong Kong Caucus
  • House Baltic Caucus
  • House Democratic Caucus
  • House Sugar Caucus
  • House Oceans Caucus
  • House Organic Caucus
  • House Recycling Caucus
  • House Rural Education Caucus
  • Hudson River Caucus
  • Hungarian American Caucus
  • Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Caucus
  • India Caucus
  • Indonesia Caucus
  • International Conservation Caucus
  • International Workers Rights Caucus
  • Interstate 69 Caucus
  • Intelligent Transportation Caucus
  • Kenya Caucus
  • Law Enforcement Caucus
  • Liberty Caucus
  • National Guard and Reserve Components Caucus
  • National Landscape Conservation System Caucus
  • National Marine Sanctuary Caucus
  • National Service Congressional Caucus
  • Navy-Marine Corps Caucus
  • New Democrat Coalition
  • North America's Supercorridor Caucus
  • Northern Border Caucus
  • Northeast-Midwest Congressional Coalition
  • Nuclear Issues Caucus
  • Out of Iraq Caucus
  • Passenger Rail Caucus
  • Patriot Act Reform Caucus
  • Pell Grant Caucus
  • Physics Caucus
  • Ports Caucus
  • Public Broadcasting Caucus
  • Qatari-American Economic Strategic Defense, Cultural and Educational Partnership Caucus
  • Recording Arts and Sciences Congressional Caucus
  • Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Caucus
  • Research and Development Caucus
  • River of Trade Corridor Congressional Caucus
  • Sex and Violence in the Media Caucus
  • Shellfish Caucus
  • Silk Road Caucus
  • Special Operations Forces Caucus
  • State Maritime Academy Caucus
  • Sudan Caucus
  • TEX-21 Congressional Caucus
  • Unexploded Ordnance Caucus
  • U.S.-Afghan Caucus
  • U.S.-Mongolia Friendship Caucus
  • U.S.-New Zealand Congressional Caucus
  • Victory in Iraq Caucus
  • Youth Challenge Caucus
  • Zero Capital Gains Tax Caucus

Employees and legislative agency directors

Legislative branch agency directors

Senate

House of Representatives

See also: Rules of the House, Rule 2: "Other officers and officials"

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Shepard, Scott (December 10, 2006). "109th may be the real 'do nothing' Congress". Cox News Service. Atlanta, GA.
  2. ^ USA Today Editorial (December 11, 2006). "Our view on Congress wrapping up: 109th Congress' big success: Lowering the achievement bar". USA Today. MacLean, VA. Archived from the original on 2007-10-21.
  3. ^ Cochran, John (2006-05-12). "'Do-Nothing Congress' Raises Critics' Ire". This Week with George Stephanopoulos. ABC.
  4. ^ "The Cafferty File: Do-Nothing Congress". The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer. 2006-12-04. CNN.cnn.com
  5. ^ "Goodbye To The Do-Nothing Congress". Face The Nation. 2006-12-10. CBS.cbsnews.com
  6. ^ Dobbs, Lou (August 2, 2006). "Five-weeks off for 'do-nothing Congress'". CNN. Retrieved 2006-11-12.
  7. ^ Mann, T.brookings.edu; Ornstein, N. (2006). "OUP USA". N.Y., N.Y.: OUP USA. Archived from the original on 2007-09-01.
  8. ^ a b c d e The Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) is affiliated with the United States Democratic Party.
  9. ^ Ohio 2nd: A primary election was held on June 14, 2005. A runoff election was held on August 2, 2005. Jean Schmidt won and took her seat the next month. See Ohio 2nd congressional district election, 2005.
  10. ^ California 48th: A primary election was held on October 4, 2005. A runoff election was held on December 6, 2005. John Campbell won and took his seat the next day.See California 48th Congressional District Election, 2005.
  11. ^ California 50th: A primary election was held on April 11, 2006. A runoff election was held on June 6, 2006. Brian Bilbray won and took his seat one week later.See California 50th congressional district special election, 2006.
  12. ^ New Jersey 13th: An election was held to fill the unexpired term at the November 7, 2006 General Election. Sires was sworn in on November 13. See New Jersey 13th congressional district special election, 2006.
  13. ^ An election was held to fill the unexpired term at the November 7, 2006 General Election. Sekula-Gibbs took her seat on November 13.
  14. ^ 2 Election Winners to Fill Vacancies", via wtopnews.com

External links

Content from Wikipedia