You Only Move Twice

"You Only Move Twice" is the second episode of The Simpsons' eighth season. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on November 3, 1996. The episode, based on a story idea by Greg Daniels, has three major concepts: the family moves to a new town; Homer gets a friendly, sympathetic boss; and that boss, unbeknownst to Homer, is a supervillain. Bart, Lisa, and Marge each have individual secondary storylines. It was directed by Mike B. Anderson and written by John Swartzwelder.

The episode title is a reference to the James Bond film You Only Live Twice, and many elements of the episode parody the Bond films, with a character modeled after Bond making a brief appearance. Setting the second and third acts in a new town, Cypress Creek, required the animators to create entirely new layouts and background designs. Albert Brooks, in his fourth appearance on The Simpsons, guest stars as the voice of Hank Scorpio, who is one of the most popular one-time characters in the entire series. The episode was very well received by critics. IGN named "You Only Move Twice" the best episode of the eighth season and Albert Brooks as one of the best guest stars in the history of the show.

"You Only Move Twice"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no.Season 8
Episode 2
Directed byMike B. Anderson
Written byJohn Swartzwelder
Production code3F23
Original air dateNovember 3, 1996[1]
Guest appearance(s)

Albert Brooks as Hank Scorpio

Episode features
Chalkboard gag"I did not learn everything I need to know in kindergarten"[2]
Couch gagEveryone parachutes into the living room, except Homer, who falls flat on the floor.[3]
CommentaryMatt Groening
Josh Weinstein
Ken Keeler
Dan Castellaneta
Mike B. Anderson

Plot

On his way to work Waylon Smithers is offered a job at the Globex Corporation. When he refuses, the offer is passed down to Homer, the next-longest-employed individual at the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant. He accepts the job and informs his family that the new job pays better and provides free health-care for the family, but involves moving to Cypress Creek. Homer tells Marge that by accepting a new higher paying job, he is one step closer to his dream of one day owning the Dallas Cowboys. The Simpson family initially opposes the move, but after they watch a promotional video about the planned community, they agree that it is much better than Springfield. After looking at the mortgage and deciding that selling the house won't cover it, they abandon their house and leave town.

Shortly after the family arrive at their new house in Cypress Creek, they meet Homer's new boss, Hank Scorpio, who is very amiable and seems like the perfect boss. After giving Homer a tour of the company, Scorpio tells him that his job is to motivate the employees in the nuclear division. Homer takes an instant liking to his new boss when Scorpio becomes the first person who does not ridicule Homer when he tells him about his dream of owning the Dallas Cowboys. Meanwhile, Bart starts school, but he finds that his new class is far above the standards of Springfield Elementary. When his teacher discovers that Bart cannot read cursive writing, he places him in a remedial class, much to Bart's shock. Lisa goes for a nature walk and discovers that she is allergic to all of the plants around Cypress Creek. Marge tries to go about her daily chores, but the house does everything automatically. This ends up depressing her to the point where Marge starts drinking wine to cope. However, Homer does an excellent job motivating his team in the nuclear division, which makes his family very proud of him.

Despite his success, Homer notices that his team members are starting to get overworked. He decides that the solution is to get them hammocks and visits Scorpio to ask where he can purchase some. Scorpio begins to tell Homer of "the Hammock district", but he is interrupted by some urgent business. It turns out that Scorpio is a criminal mastermind formulating a plot to take over the East Coast of the United States with a doomsday device, as he turns to a screen and threatens the United Nations Security Council by declaring that he has got hold of the doomsday device and that they have 72 hours to meet his demand of gold. To prove his intent, he blows up the 59th Street Bridge. Despite being in the same room, Homer appears oblivious to Scorpio's nefarious plan as he was looking outside the window.

Later, Scorpio has managed to capture a secret agent named Mr. Bont. Scorpio intends to have Bont killed with a laser, but Bont uses a coin to free himself from his restraints before attempting to flee. However, Homer, who is unaware of events, easily knocks him down, allowing Scorpio's soldiers to shoot the agent. A proud Scorpio happily thanks Homer for a job well done and tells him his house will get an extra floor. At dinner, Homer proudly tells of his successes at work, but discovers that his family hates Cypress Creek and want to go back to Springfield. At first, Homer is opposed to this, saying that he has been doing a great job for the first time in his life, but nobody else is happy. Dejected, Homer decides to visit Scorpio back at Globex Headquarters. His visit coincides with an assault by the U.S. military, but Homer still remains oblivious to what is taking place. He finds Scorpio, explains the situation, and asks what to do. Scorpio initially tells Homer to abandon his family and continue working for him. After much debate he finally advises Homer that he should do what is best for his family.

The next day, the family returns to Springfield, as Scorpio succeeds in his plot and seizes control of the East Coast. Homer, who previously confided to Scorpio his dream of owning the Dallas Cowboys, expresses disappointment when he instead discovers the Denver Broncos practicing ineptly on his front lawn as a present from his former boss. He reads a letter from Scorpio thanking him for his hard work and wishing that owning the Denver Broncos will eventually lead to Homer owning the Dallas Cowboys. Marge tells Homer that the Denver Broncos is a good football team while Homer sighs and tells Marge that she doesn't understand football at all.

Production

Cypress Creek
For the town of Cypress Creek, the animators had to design entirely new background paintings such as this one.

The original concept for the episode came from a story idea by Greg Daniels, and the writing staff came up with three major concepts. The first involves the Simpson family moving out of Springfield, which the writers initially hoped would fool the audience into thinking it was a permanent move. As a result, they tried to work in as many characters as they could during the first act of the episode to make it seem that the family really was leaving. The second involved Homer getting a new job for an employee-friendly boss in contrast to the tyrannical Mr. Burns. The third was that Homer's new boss would be a supervillain resembling Ernst Stavro Blofeld. This element was meant to be in the background and Homer would be ignorant to it.[4]

The writers sought to give every family member their own story. The writing staff spent some time arguing over whether to include in the episode the depressing idea of Marge becoming an alcoholic.[4] There was originally another involving Grampa Simpson, wherein he is left behind in Springfield and receives recorded greeting phone calls. The plot went on for four sequences, all of which were cut from the episode for time constraints but later included in the DVD release.[5] Cypress Creek was called "Emerald Caverns" during most of production,[6] but the name was changed because the writers felt that "Cypress Creek" had more of a "Silicon Valley" feel.[4]

The show's writers did not worry too much about perfecting Scorpio's lines because they knew Brooks would rewrite or ad lib new ones.[4] Entire parts of Scorpio's dialogue, such as his hammock speech, are Brooks's lines and not the writers'. Dan Castellaneta described how, after he prepared something for Homer to say in response to Brooks's new Scorpio lines, Brooks would deliver totally different lines in the next take.[7] Josh Weinstein said Homer's reactions are exactly like someone talking to Albert Brooks.[4] In all, his recordings amounted to over two hours in length.[6] Brooks voiced the character Russ Cargill in The Simpsons Movie and for "about a week", he was to reprise the role of Scorpio, but the staff felt that creating a new character was a better idea.[8]

The animators needed to design completely new sets for the episode. Christian Roman, John Reiss, and Mike Anderson storyboarded the episode. In the original animatic, Santa's Little Helper and Snowball II were not present, so the animators went back and added them, even though they are not a part of the story.[9] It is a common misconception that Scorpio's design was modeled after Richard Branson, which it was not.[4] The final design, which underwent an overhaul, was hailed by the writers as "the perfect madman".[9] All of the students in Bart's remedial class were initially given hair modeled on Ralph Wiggum's, but the staff felt that the children looked "kinda troubled", so their designs were altered.[9]

The man whom Homer tackles, Mr. Bont, was initially supposed to just be James Bond, but Fox, concerned about a lawsuit, would not let them use it. The writers went with "Bont" because they felt it was the most similar name that they could legally use.[4]

Cultural references

The final scene at Globex contains several references to action and James Bond films. The episode title and many references are from the Bond film You Only Live Twice, as well as an allusion to A View to a Kill.[3] A character modeled after Sean Connery's Bond is tackled by Homer and killed after a parody of the laser scene from Goldfinger.[4] Miss Goodthighs from the 1967 James Bond parody Casino Royale makes an appearance in the episode[7] and can be seen attacking a character modeled after U.S. Army general Norman Schwarzkopf.[4]

The sign at the elementary school displays "http://www.studynet.edu". Weinstein called it "one of the show's most obviously dated jokes" because the idea of a school having its own website was almost a novelty in 1996.[4]

The song at the end of the show, written by Ken Keeler, is a parody of various Bond themes. Keeler originally wrote it to be three seconds longer and sound more like the Goldfinger theme, but the final version was shorter and the lyrics were sped up.[6] The writers wanted the song to be sung by Shirley Bassey, who sang several Bond themes, but they could not get her to record the part.[4]

Reception

Albert Brooks at 'Drive' premiere TIFF 9.10.11
Hank Scorpio is arguably the most popular character in the series voiced by guest star Albert Brooks.

In its original broadcast, "You Only Move Twice" finished 50th in ratings for the week of October 28 – November 3, 1996, with a Nielsen rating of 8.5, equivalent to approximately 8.2 million viewing households. It was the second highest-rated show on the Fox network that week, following The X-Files.[10]

Hank Scorpio is arguably the most popular and famous Albert Brooks-voiced character.[4] In 2006, Albert Brooks was named the best The Simpsons guest star by IGN, who cited Scorpio as his best role.[11] The Phoenix.com compiled their own list, also placing Brooks in the first position.[12] In his book Planet Simpson, author Chris Turner says Brooks is second only to Phil Hartman among The Simpsons guest stars and that "Brooks brings hilarious satirical seamlessness to Scorpio's paradoxical nature". He also writes that the delivery of Scorpio's final line seals Brooks's place in The Simpsons history.[13] The Simpson family's new street address, 15201 Maple Systems Road, is writer Ken Keeler's favorite street name in the show.[6]

IGN also named the episode the best of the eighth season, saying the episode "is a wonderful example of slowly building up the comedy [...] it's impossible to fathom this one not being very high up on any list of the best Simpsons episodes of all time."[14] Robert Canning gave the episode a "Masterful" score of ten out of ten, saying the episode "may well be the greatest Simpsons episode of all time".[15] Warren Martyn and Adrian Wood, the authors of the book I Can't Believe It's a Bigger and Better Updated Unofficial Simpsons Guide, called it "a tremendous episode" saying it had "some really good moments, most of them involving Bart, Lisa, and Marge's loathing for Cypress Creek. The remedial kids are fab (especially Warren) and Lisa's second chipmunk encounter is inspired. Scorpio is a good character, especially his Christopher Walken-esque killing spree." They also stated that the owl grabbing the chipmunk during Lisa's trip to the forest is one of the all-time greatest sight gags in the show's history.[3] Chris Turner also said that the remedial boy Gordy's line may be "the broadest parody of a Canadian accent in the history of American pop culture".[16] Ben Rayner of the Toronto Star included "You Only Move Twice" on his list of the best episodes of The Simpsons.[17] In his review of The Complete Eighth Season DVD set, Raul Burriel described it as one of the "most clever episodes the series has ever given us".[18]

References

  1. ^ "You Only Move Twice". The Simpsons.com. Retrieved September 29, 2011.
  2. ^ Richmond & Coffman 1997, p. 212.
  3. ^ a b c Martyn, Warren; Wood, Adrian (2000). "You Only Move Twice". BBC. Retrieved March 27, 2007.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Weinstein, Josh (2006). The Simpsons season 8 DVD commentary for the episode "You Only Move Twice" (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  5. ^ Weinstein, Josh (2006). The Simpsons season 8 DVD commentary for the Deleted Scenes (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  6. ^ a b c d Keeler, Ken (2006). The Simpsons season 8 DVD commentary for the episode "You Only Move Twice" (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  7. ^ a b Castellaneta, Dan (2006). The Simpsons season 8 DVD commentary for the episode "You Only Move Twice" (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  8. ^ Anderson, Mike B.; Dean Moore, Steven; Moore, Rich; Silverman, David (2007). Audio Director's commentary (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  9. ^ a b c Anderson, Mike B. (2006). The Simpsons season 8 DVD commentary for the episode "You Only Move Twice" (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  10. ^ Bauder, David (November 8, 1996). "ABC roars into 1st behind 'Lion King, Drew Carey Show'". The Florida Times-Union. p. D-2.
  11. ^ Goldman, Eric; Iverson, Dan; Zoromski, Brian. "Top 25 Simpsons Guest Appearances". IGN. Retrieved March 25, 2007.
  12. ^ "The Simpsons 20 best guest voices of all time". The Phoenix.com. March 29, 2006. Archived from the original on November 16, 2006. Retrieved March 10, 2007.
  13. ^ Turner 2004, p. 388.
  14. ^ Goldman, Eric; Dan Iverson, Brian Zoromski (September 8, 2006). "The Simpsons: 17 Seasons, 17 Episodes". IGN. Retrieved March 25, 2007.
  15. ^ Canning, Robert (August 4, 2009). "The Simpsons Flashback: "You Only Move Twice" Review". IGN. Retrieved July 14, 2010.
  16. ^ Turner 2004, p. 50.
  17. ^ Rayner, Ben (May 20, 2007). "Eye on Springfield". Toronto Star. Archived from the original on June 15, 2007. Retrieved November 19, 2008.
  18. ^ Burriel, Raul (August 28, 2006). "DVD Review: The Simpsons — The Complete Eighth Season". The Trades. Archived from the original on October 12, 2013. Retrieved November 19, 2008.

Bibliography

External links

500 Keys

"500 Keys" is the twenty-first episode of the twenty-second season of The Simpsons. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on May 15, 2011. It was written by John Frink and directed by Bob Anderson.

Albert Brooks

Albert Lawrence Brooks (born Albert Lawrence Einstein; July 22, 1947) is an American actor, comedian, writer, and director. He received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor for 1987's Broadcast News and was widely praised for his performance in the 2011 film Drive. His voice acting credits include, Marlin in Finding Nemo (2003) and Finding Dory (2016), and recurring guest voices for The Simpsons, including Russ Cargill in The Simpsons Movie (2007) and Hank Scorpio.

He has written, directed, and starred in several comedy films, such as Modern Romance (1981), Lost in America (1985), and Defending Your Life (1991). He is also the author of 2030: The Real Story of What Happens to America (2011).

All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten

All I Really Need To Know I Learned in Kindergarten is a book of short essays by American minister and author Robert Fulghum. It was first published in 1986.

The title of the book is taken from the first essay in the volume, in which Fulghum lists lessons normally learned in American kindergarten classrooms and explains how the world would be improved if adults adhered to the same basic rules as children, i.e. sharing, being kind to one another, cleaning up after themselves, and living "a balanced life" of work, play, and learning.

The book contains fifty short essays, ranging in length from approximately 200 to 1,000 words, which are ruminations on topics ranging from surprises, holidays, childhood, death, and the lives of interesting people including Mother Teresa. In his introduction, Fulghum describes these as having been "written over many years and addressed to friends, family, a religious community, and myself, with no thought of publication in book form."

Bill Oakley

William Lloyd Oakley (born February 27, 1966) is an American television writer and producer, known for his work on the animated comedy series The Simpsons. Oakley and Josh Weinstein became best friends and writing partners at high school; Oakley then attended Harvard University and was Vice President of the Harvard Lampoon. He worked on several short-term media projects, including writing for the variety show Sunday Best, but was then unemployed for a long period.

Oakley and Weinstein eventually penned a spec script for Seinfeld, after which they wrote "Marge Gets a Job", an episode of The Simpsons. Subsequently, the two were hired to write for the show on a permanent basis in 1992. After they wrote episodes such as "$pringfield (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Legalized Gambling)", "Bart vs. Australia" and "Who Shot Mr. Burns?", the two were appointed executive producers and showrunners for the seventh and eighth seasons of the show. They attempted to include several emotional episodes focusing on the Simpson family, as well as several high-concept episodes such as "Homer's Enemy", "Two Bad Neighbors" and "The Principal and the Pauper", winning three Primetime Emmy Awards for their work.

After they left The Simpsons, Oakley and Weinstein created Mission Hill. The show was plagued by promotional issues and was swiftly canceled. They worked as consulting producers on Futurama, then created The Mullets in 2003. The two wrote several unsuccessful TV pilots, and were due to serve as showrunners on Sit Down, Shut Up in 2009. Oakley left the project over a contract dispute. He has since written for The Cleveland Show and Portlandia, without Weinstein. He also served as co-executive producer and writer on Portlandia, sharing a Writers Guild of America Award with his fellow writers in 2013. In 2018, Oakley reunited with Weinstein as co-executive producer on Disenchantment, Matt Groening's series for Netflix. Oakley is married to fellow writer Rachel Pulido.

Cypress Creek

Cypress Creek may refer to:

United StatesCypress Creek (Logan Creek), a stream in Missouri

Cypress Creek (Texas), a stream in Waller County, Texas, United States

Cypress Creek (Tri-Rail station), in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Cypress Creek EMS, an emergency medical service provider in Houston, Texas

Cypress Creek High School (disambiguation)

Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge, Illinois, United States

Cypress Creek Preserve, a 7,400 acre park in Pasco County, Florida

Cypress Creek Preserve, Pasco County, a 255-acre area of protected land in Pasco County, Florida

Cypress Creek Town Center, Wesley Chapel, FloridaFictionalCypress Creek, a fictional place as seen on The Simpsons episode "You Only Move Twice"

Denver Broncos

The Denver Broncos are a professional American football franchise based in Denver, Colorado. The Broncos compete as a member club of the National Football League (NFL)'s American Football Conference (AFC) West division. The team began play in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL) and joined the NFL as part of the merger in 1970. The Broncos are owned by the Pat Bowlen trust and currently play home games at Broncos Stadium at Mile High (formerly known as Invesco Field at Mile High from 2001–2010 and Sports Authority Field at Mile High from 2011–2017). Prior to that, they played at Mile High Stadium from 1960 to 2000.

The Broncos were barely competitive during their 10-year run in the AFL and their first seven years in the NFL. They did not complete a winning season until 1973. In 1977, four years later, they qualified for the playoffs for the first time in franchise history and advanced to Super Bowl XII. Since 1975, the Broncos have become one of the NFL's most successful teams, having suffered only seven losing seasons. They have won eight AFC Championships (1977, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1997, 1998, 2013, 2015), and three Super Bowl championships (1997 (XXXII), 1998 (XXXIII), 2015 (50)), and share the NFL record for most Super Bowl losses (5 — tied with the New England Patriots). Twelve players who have played for Denver are enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame: John Elway, Floyd Little, Shannon Sharpe, Gary Zimmerman, Willie Brown, Tony Dorsett, Jerry Rice, Andre Reed, Terrell Davis, Brian Dawkins, Ty Law and Champ Bailey, along with Broncos late owner Pat Bowlen.

John Swartzwelder

John Joseph Swartzwelder Jr. (born February 8, 1949) is an American comedy writer and novelist, best known for his work on the animated television series The Simpsons. Born in Seattle, Washington, Swartzwelder began his career working in advertising. He was later hired to work on comedy series Saturday Night Live in the mid-1980s as a writer. He later contributed to fellow writer George Meyer's short-lived Army Man magazine, which led him to join the original writing team of The Simpsons, beginning in 1989.

He worked on The Simpsons as a writer and producer until 2003, and later contributed to The Simpsons Movie. He is credited with writing the largest number of Simpsons episodes (59 full episodes, with contributions to several others) by a large margin. After his retirement from the show, he began a career as a writer of self-published absurdist novels. He has written more than eleven novels, the most recent of which, Burly Go Home, was published in 2017.

Swartzwelder is revered among comedy fans; his colleagues have called him among the best comedy writers. He is famously averse to press.

Josh Weinstein

Josh Weinstein (born May 5, 1966) is an American television writer and producer, known for his work on the animated comedy series The Simpsons. Weinstein and Bill Oakley became best friends and writing partners at St. Albans High School; Weinstein then attended Stanford University and was editor-in-chief of the Stanford Chaparral. He worked on several short-term media projects, including writing for the variety show Sunday Best, but was then unemployed for a long period.

Weinstein and Oakley eventually penned a spec script for Seinfeld, after which they wrote "Marge Gets a Job", an episode of The Simpsons. Subsequently, the two were hired to write for the show on a permanent basis in 1992. After they wrote episodes such as "$pringfield (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Legalized Gambling)", "Bart vs. Australia" and "Who Shot Mr. Burns?", the two were appointed executive producers and showrunners for the seventh and eighth seasons of the show. They attempted to include several emotional episodes focusing on the Simpson family, as well as several high-concept episodes such as "Homer's Enemy", "Two Bad Neighbors" and "The Principal and the Pauper", winning three Primetime Emmy Awards for their work.

After they left The Simpsons, Oakley and Weinstein created Mission Hill. The show was plagued by promotional issues and was swiftly canceled, but in subsequent years has gone on to develop a cult following. They worked as consulting producers on Futurama, then created The Mullets in 2003. The two wrote several unsuccessful TV pilots, and were due to serve as showrunners on Sit Down, Shut Up in 2009. Oakley left the project over a contract dispute, but Weinstein remained until it was canceled. He co-produced and wrote for Futurama again during its Comedy Central revival, winning an Emmy in 2011. Since 2013, Weinstein has served as showrunner for the CBBC series Strange Hill High, and in 2015, Danger Mouse. He has also served as a writer for Season Two of Gravity Falls, co-writing nine of the season's episodes. In 2018, Weinstein co-developed the Netflix animated series Disenchantment with creator Matt Groening, of which he and Oakley are currently serving as co-showrunners. Weinstein is married to journalist Lisa Simmons.

List of James Bond parodies and spin-offs

The James Bond series of novels and films has been parodied numerous times in a number of different media, including books, comics, films, games, and television shows. Most notable of all these parodies is the 1967 spoof Casino Royale, which was produced using the actual film rights purchased from Ian Fleming over a decade prior to its release. Unlike an imitation, a spoof is usually protected from lawsuits by the people whose property is being parodied.

Marge in Chains

"Marge in Chains" is the 21st episode of The Simpsons' fourth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on May 6, 1993. In the episode, Marge is arrested for shoplifting after forgetting to pay for an item at the Kwik-E-Mart. The family hires attorney Lionel Hutz to defend her at trial, but she is found guilty and sentenced to 30 days imprisonment. Homer, and the rest of the family have trouble coping without Marge. The townspeople start a riot when an annual bake sale missing Marge fails to raise enough money for a statue of Abraham Lincoln and they have to settle for a statue of Jimmy Carter. Mayor Quimby has Marge released from jail in order to save his career and quell the riot.

After its initial airing on Fox, the episode was later included as part of a 1997 video release titled The Simpsons: Crime and Punishment. It was released again on the 2005 edition of the same set. The episode is included in the June 15, 2004 DVD release of The Simpsons – The Complete Fourth Season. "Marge in Chains" received a positive reception from television critics. A quote by Lionel Hutz from the episode was included in The News Tribune's "Eight Great 'Simpsons' Quotes". The authors of I Can't Believe It's a Bigger and Better Updated Unofficial Simpsons Guide commented positively on the episode, as did reviews in The Daily Mirror and The Observer.

Mike B. Anderson

Mike B. Anderson (born 1973), sometimes credited as Mikel B. Anderson, is an American television director who works on The Simpsons and has directed numerous episodes of the show, and was animated in "The Secret War of Lisa Simpson" as cadet Anderson. While a college student, he directed the live action feature films Alone in the T-Shirt Zone (1986) and Kamillions (1989). Since 1990, he has worked primarily in animation including being a consulting producer on the series, "The Oblongs", and story consultant on "Tripping the Rift".

He has won two Emmy Awards for directing Simpsons episodes, "Homer's Phobia" in 1997 and "HOMR" in 2001. For "Homer's Phobia" he won the Annie Award for Best Individual Achievement: Directing in a TV Production, and the WAC Winner Best Director for Primetime Series at the 1998 World Animation Celebration. Mike was also a sequence director on "The Simpsons Movie" (2007), was the supervising director on "The Simpsons Ride" at Universal Studios and is currently the supervising director for "The Simpsons" television series.

NOVA Pro Wrestling

NOVA Pro Wrestling (often referred to as simply NOVA Pro) is an American professional wrestling promotion that was established in 2015 based in Northern Virginia. The company's name comes from the abbreviation of its location, Northern Virginia ("NoVa"). The promotion was founded by Mike King Jr., and his son, Mike E. King, with the intention to showcase the top independent wrestlers of Virginia, Maryland, and the general Mid-Atlantic region, as well as bring some of independent wrestling’s popular names to the Northern Virginia area. The debut show, titled "The NOVA Project", took place on September 25, 2015 in Fairfax, Virginia.

Nuclear blackmail

Nuclear blackmail is a form of nuclear strategy in which an aggressor uses the threat of use of nuclear weapons to force an adversary to perform some action or make some concessions. It is a type of extortion, related to brinkmanship.

The Heartbroke Kid

"The Heartbroke Kid" is the seventeenth episode of the sixteenth season of The Simpsons. It was written by Ian Maxtone-Graham and directed by Steven Dean Moore. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on May 1, 2005. Albert Brooks guest stars in the episode, playing the character Tab Spangler, as well as briefly reprising Jacques from Life in the Fast Lane.

"The Heartbroke Kid" is the 352nd episode in the program's history and was broadcast straight after the 351st episode, "Don't Fear the Roofer", on the Fox network in the United States.

The Homer They Fall

"The Homer They Fall" is the third episode of The Simpsons' eighth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on November 10, 1996. After Homer realizes he has a bizarre medical condition that renders him unable to be knocked out, he is convinced to embark on a career as a boxer by Moe Szyslak, who manages him. The episode was written by Jonathan Collier and directed by Mark Kirkland. It guest stars Michael Buffer as himself and Paul Winfield as Lucius Sweet.

The Simpsons (season 7)

The Simpsons' seventh season originally aired on the Fox network between September 17, 1995 and May 19, 1996. The show runners for the seventh production season were Bill Oakley and Josh Weinstein who would executive produce 21 episodes this season. David Mirkin executive produced the remaining four, including two hold overs that were produced for the previous season. The season was nominated for two Primetime Emmy Awards, including Outstanding Animated Program and won an Annie Award for Best Animated Television Program. The DVD box set was released in Region 1 December 13, 2005, Region 2 January 30, 2006 and Region 4 on March 22, 2006. The set was released in two different forms: a Marge-shaped box and also a standard rectangular-shaped box in which the theme is a movie premiere.

The Simpsons (season 8)

The Simpsons' eighth season originally aired on the Fox network between October 27, 1996, and May 18, 1997, beginning with "Treehouse of Horror VII". The showrunners for the eighth production season were Bill Oakley and Josh Weinstein. The aired season contained two episodes that were hold-over episodes from season seven, which Oakley and Weinstein also ran. It also contained two episodes for which Al Jean and Mike Reiss were the show runners.

Season eight received critical acclaim and won multiple awards, including two Emmy Awards: "Homer's Phobia" won for Outstanding Animated Program (for Programming One Hour or Less) in 1997, and Alf Clausen and Ken Keeler won for "Outstanding Individual Achievement in Music and Lyrics" with the song "We Put the Spring in Springfield" from the episode "Bart After Dark". Clausen also received an Emmy nomination for "Outstanding Music Direction" for "Simpsoncalifragilisticexpiala(Annoyed Grunt)cious". "Brother from Another Series" was nominated for the Emmy for "Sound Mixing For a Comedy Series or a Special". For "Homer's Phobia", Mike Anderson won the Annie Award for Best Individual Achievement: Directing in a TV Production, and the WAC Winner Best Director for Primetime Series at the 1998 World Animation Celebration. Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation awarded the episode the GLAAD Media Award for "Outstanding TV – Individual Episode".The DVD box set was released in Region 1 on August 15, 2006, Region 2 on October 2, 2006, and Region 4 on September 27, 2006. The set was released in two different forms: a Maggie-shaped head to match the Homer and Marge shaped heads of the previous two sets and also a standard rectangular shaped box. Like the seventh season box set, both versions are available for sale separately.

Tom Landry

Thomas Wade Landry (September 11, 1924 – February 12, 2000) was an American football player and coach. He was the original head coach of the Dallas Cowboys in the National Football League (NFL), a position he held for 29 seasons. During his coaching career, he created many new formations and methods, such as the now popular 4–3 defense, and the "flex defense" system made famous by the Doomsday Defense squads he created during his tenure with the Cowboys. His 29 consecutive years from 1960 to 1988 as the coach of one team are an NFL record, along with his 20 consecutive winning seasons, which is considered to be his most impressive professional accomplishment.

In addition to his record 20 consecutive winning seasons from 1966 to 1985, Landry won two Super Bowl titles in VI and XII, five NFC titles, and 13 Divisional titles. He compiled a 270–178–6 record, the fourth-most wins all-time for an NFL coach, and his 20 career playoff victories are the second most of any coach in NFL history. Landry was also named the NFL Coach of the Year in 1966 and the NFC Coach of the Year in 1975.

From 1966 to 1982, Dallas played in 12 NFL or NFC Championship games, a span of 17 years. Furthermore, the Cowboys appeared in 10 NFC Championship games in the 13-year span from 1970 to 1982. Leading the Cowboys to three Super Bowl appearances in four years between 1975 and 1978, and five in nine years between 1970 and 1978, along with being on television more than any other NFL team, resulted in the Cowboys receiving the label of "America's Team", a title Landry did not appreciate because he felt it would bring on extra motivation from the rest of the league to compete with the Cowboys. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1990.

Treehouse of Horror VII

"Treehouse of Horror VII" is the first episode of The Simpsons' eighth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 27, 1996. In the seventh annual Treehouse of Horror episode, Bart discovers his long-lost twin, Lisa grows a colony of small beings, and Kang and Kodos impersonate Bill Clinton and Bob Dole in order to win the 1996 presidential election. It was written by Ken Keeler, Dan Greaney, and David S. Cohen, and directed by Mike B. Anderson. Phil Hartman provided the voice of Bill Clinton.

Season 8
Themed episodes
See also
Franchise
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Key personnel
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Retired numbers
Division championships (15)
Conference championships (8)
League championships (3)
Media
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Seasons (58)

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