Yorkshire Wolds Way

The Yorkshire Wolds Way is a National Trail in Yorkshire, England. It runs 79 miles (127 km) from Hessle to Filey, around the Yorkshire Wolds. At Filey Brigg, it connects with the Cleveland Way, another National Trail. In 2007 the Yorkshire Wolds Way celebrated the 25th anniversary of its official opening which took place on 2 October 1982.[1]

Bratt Wood Nunburnholme
Yorkshire Wolds Way through Bratt Wood, Nunburnholme
Yorkshire Wolds Way
Yorkshire Wolds Way Sign
Yorkshire Wolds Way sign at Market Weighton
Length79 mi (127 km)
LocationYorkshire, England
DesignationUK National Trail
TrailheadsHessle, East Riding of Yorkshire
53°43′26″N 0°26′10″W / 53.724°N 0.436°W
Filey, North Yorkshire
54°12′36″N 0°17′31″W / 54.210°N 0.292°W
UseHiking
Hiking details
SeasonAll year

Route

Yorkshire Wolds Way is located in Yorkshire and the Humber
Hessle
Hessle
South Cave
South Cave
Wharram Percy
Wharram Percy
Millington
Millington
Market Weighton
Market Weighton
Sherburn
Sherburn
Filey
Filey
Common stops along the Yorkshire Wolds Way


The route of the Yorkshire Wolds Way passes close to or through the following places:

Places in italics are slightly off the main route.

BBC documentary

Yorkshire Wolds Way, a two-part BBC television documentary, features a journey along the Yorkshire Wolds Way. Presenter Paul Rose describes the trail as "arguably Britain's least well-known national walking trail". The documentary was first broadcast in January 2017.[2][3]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Yorkshire Wolds Way chalks up 25 years". The National Trail website. Natural England. 2007. Retrieved 25 October 2007.
  2. ^ "New BBC Programme on the Yorkshire Wolds Way". National Trails. 9 January 2017. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  3. ^ "Yorkshire Wolds Way". BBC One. 13 January 2017. Retrieved 11 September 2018.

Further reading

  • Walking The Wolds Way, David Clensy, 2007. ISBN 978-1-4303-1019-8
  • Yorkshire Wolds Way, Roger Ratcliffe, 2011. Official National Trail Guide. ISBN 978-1-84513-643-7

External links

Beverley 20

The Beverley 20 is a walk in the East Riding of Yorkshire that runs between Beverley Minster and the Humber Bridge that pass through the local villages of Skidby and North Ferriby. It also clips the edge of Walkington.

The paths themselves are also used by other longer routes. The section from the Humber Bridge to North Ferriby is used by the Yorkshire Wolds Way, High Hunsley Circuit and the Trans Pennine Trail.

The Beverley 20 is the first stage of a four-part walk from The Humber Bridge to Filey, The East Riding Heritage Trail.

Centenary Way

The Centenary Way is a route devised to celebrate the 100th anniversary of North Yorkshire County Council.

It was opened by Chris Brasher in 1989 to mark the Centenary of the governance by County Councils.

The route runs across the Howardian Hills and Yorkshire Wolds via Castle Howard and Wharram Percy, linking York and the Foss Walk with the Yorkshire Wolds Way and Cleveland Way National Trails.

Meeting the Derwent and Foss, the walk combines riverside walks in deep valleys with forest tracks.Part of the route overlaps with the Yorkshire Wolds Way which also ends at Filey along with the Cleveland Way.

Start: SE603522 - York, North Yorkshire

Finish: TA126817 - Filey Brigg, North Yorkshire

Waymark: Letters CW on standard waymarks

Cleveland Way

The Cleveland Way is a National Trail in ancient Cleveland in northern England. It runs 110 miles (177 km) between Helmsley and the Brigg at Filey, skirting the North York Moors National Park.

East Heslerton

East Heslerton is a village, near Malton in North Yorkshire, England. It lies between the villages of West Heslerton and Sherburn, at the interface between the Vale of Pickering to the north and the Yorkshire Wolds to the south. With West Heslerton it forms part of the civil parish of Heslerton which had a population of 409 at the 2011 census.East Heslerton forms the westernmost part of the Sherburn ward of Ryedale District Council. The ward extends eastwards as far as Staxton.

The Yorkshire Wolds Way and Centenary Way pass approximately one mile to the south of the village.

Filey

Filey () is a small town and civil parish in North Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the East Riding of Yorkshire, it is part of the borough of Scarborough between Scarborough and Bridlington on the North Sea coast. Although it was a fishing village, it has a large beach and became a popular tourist resort.

According to the 2011 UK census, Filey parish had a population of 6,981, an exact number being 2001 UK census 6,819.

Fridaythorpe

Fridaythorpe is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 8 miles (13 km) north-east of Pocklington town centre

and lies on the A166 road. It is 550 feet (170 m) above sea level, making it the highest village in the Yorkshire Wolds.

According to the 2011 UK census, Fridaythorpe parish had a population of 319, an increase on the 2001 UK census figure of 183.St Mary's Church, Fridaythorpe was restored in 1902–3 with the addition of a new north aisle designed by C. Hodgson Fowler and stained glass by Burlison and Grylls. In January 1967 the church was designated a Grade I listed building and is now recorded in the National Heritage List for England, maintained by Historic England. It is on the Sykes Churches Trail devised by the East Yorkshire Churches Group.The Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail, a long distance footpath passes through the village and the village is the midpoint of the trail.

Village amenities include a Mace general shop and petrol filling station, an agricultural store, a vehicle mechanic business, and a cafe.In 1823 Fridaythorpe inhabitants numbered 275. Occupations included eleven farmers, three wheelwrights, two blacksmiths, two grocers, two shoemakers, three tailors, a tanner, and the landlords of the Cross Keys and Hare & Hounds public houses. Carriers operated between the village and Driffield every Thursday, and York every Saturday. In the village was a Methodist chapel.The village previously hosted the World Championship Flat Cap Throwing Competition at its summer fete. The championship was last contested in 2014.

Ganton

Ganton is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated on the south side of the Vale of Pickering immediately north of the Yorkshire Wolds. Ganton lies 7 miles (11 km) west of the coastal town of Filey, and 9 miles (14 km) south-west of Scarborough.

The village appears in the Domesday Book and its name is thought to mean 'Galma's farmstead'.

Ganton is situated on the Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail and Centenary Way, long-distance footpaths. Its most notable landmark is its golf course. The Ganton Golf Club has hosted the Ryder Cup matches in 1949, The Amateur Championship three times, in 1964, 1977 and 1991, and the Walker Cup in 2003.

The Grade II listed Ganton Hall is the family seat of the investment banker and businessman Nicholas Wrigley. In December 2017, Wrigley resigned as chairman of Persimmon plc over his role in awarding Jeff Fairburn, the CEO, a £128 million bonus.From 1845 to 1930, the village was served by Ganton station on the York to Scarborough railway line. An 18th-century coaching inn at the centre of the village has since been converted to a public house with bed and breakfast.

In 1823 Ganton was a parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire and the Wapentake of Dickering. The church of St Nicholas was under the patronage of the local Legard baronets. Population at the time was 278, which included the nearby settlement of Brompton. Occupations included three farmers, two carpenters, a gardener, a stone mason, a tailor, a licensed victualler & blacksmith, a druggist & gun maker, and a machine maker. There was a schoolmaster, a vicar, a curate, and Sir Thomas Legard of Ganton Hall. Two carriers operated between the village and Beverley and Driffield twice weekly. To the south-west of Ganton was the settlement of Ganton Dale Inn, which contained a public house that was also a post house.The village church on Main Street is dedicated to St Nicholas. Ganton cricket team plays at the ground overlooking the A64 next to the village hall.

The small village of Potter Brompton lies at the western end of the parish.

Ganton Cricket Club field two teams in the Scarborough Beckett Cricket League.

Goodmanham

Goodmanham (historically Godmundingaham, the home of the people of Godmund mentioned in the year 627 in Bede's Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum ) is a small village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 2 miles (3 km) to the north-east of Market Weighton. The village is situated on the Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail, a long distance footpath.

According to the 2011 UK Census, Goodmanham parish had a population of 244, an increase on the 2001 UK Census figure of 218.The village is built in a favourable position on a south-facing slope of the Yorkshire Wolds between two streams. It has a copious supply of water from numerous springs and naturally occurring limestone for building. The land is extraordinarily fertile in this region and people have lived here since prehistoric times.

High Hunsley

High Hunsley is a small hamlet in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated in the Yorkshire Wolds approximately 6 miles (10 km) south-west of Beverley town centre and 2 miles (3 km) north-west of the village of Little Weighton.

High Hunsley forms part of the civil parish of Rowley. It is situated on the B1230 road and the Yorkshire Wolds Way passes close to the west.

In 1823 Hunsley (then both High and Low), was in the civil parish of Rowley and the Wapentake of Harthill. Baines' History, Directory and Gazetteer of the County of York stated that Hunsley was formerly "a place of some consequence," where "the foundations of ancient buildings are sometimes dug up". Occupations at the time included two farmers, a corn factor (trader), a yeoman, and a gentlewoman.

High Hunsley Circuit

The High Hunsley Circuit is a 25½ mile circular walk in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England that visits the villages of Walkington, Skidby, Brantingham, South Cave and Bishop Burton.

The paths themselves are also used by other routes, Yorkshire Wolds Way and Beverley 20.

Huggate

Huggate is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 13 miles (21 km) north-west of Beverley town centre and 9 miles (14 km) west of Driffield town centre. The village of North Dalton lies 4 miles (6 km) to the south-east.

According to the 2011 UK census, Huggate parish had a population of 342, an increase on the 2001 UK census figure of 317.Huggate has one of the deepest wells in England. The village contains the Wolds Inn public house on the Driffield road.

The parish church of St Mary is a Grade I listed building.The Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail, a long distance footpath passes to the north of the village. There are walks through the local area.

Londesborough

Londesborough is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 2.5 miles (4 km) north of the market town of Market Weighton.

The civil parish is formed by the village of Londesborough and the hamlet of Middlethorpe.

According to the 2011 UK census, Londesborough parish had a population of 182, a reduction of one on the 2001 UK census figure.The Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail, a long distance footpath passes through the village. Some scholars suggest the still-undiscovered Roman camp of Delgovicia is in the vicinity of Londesborough. Londesborough Hall was a country house in the village but all that now remains is the park land that surrounded the house which is called Londesborough Park. The church dedicated to All Saints was designated a Grade I listed building in 1967 and is now recorded in the National Heritage List for England, maintained by Historic England. In 1823 Londesborough was a civil parish in the Holme Beacon Division in the Wapentake of Harthill. Londesborough is one of the sites in the East Riding that have been conjectured as the Romano-British town of Delgovicia, an eastern station associated with York. A Roman road from Brough on the Humber Estuary ran directly north to meet Londesborough estate and village, where were found Roman coins and burial repositories. The estate of Londesborough was one of the seats of the Dukes of Devonshire. It was an historical possession of the Clifford family—Earls of Cumberland—until the 5th Earl's only heiress married the Earl of Cork, from whose family the Dukes of Devonshire are descended. The estate's mansion in 1823 had recently been demolished. The 6th Duke of Devonshire was the patron of All Saints' Church, the ecclesiastical parish living, and a hospital for "six old bachelors or widowers, and six widows". Londesborough population in 1823 was 244. Within the parish was a blacksmith, a clerk, a schoolmaster who was also the parish clerk, the parish rector, the agent for the Duke of Devonshire, and the landlord of The Devonshire Arms public house who was also a maltster. Londesborough was served by Londesborough railway station on the York to Beverley Line between 1847 and 1965.

Market Weighton

Market Weighton ( WEE-tən) is a small town and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is one of the main market towns in the East Yorkshire Wolds and lies midway between Hull and York, about 20 miles (32 km) from either one. According to the 2011 UK census, Market Weighton parish had a population of 6,429, an increase on the 2001 UK census figure of 5,212.

The 19th-century English lexicographer Sir William Smith proposed Market Weighton as the location of the still-undiscovered Roman camp of Delgovicia. Historically the town was listed in the Domesday Book as "Wicstun" and was granted its charter to become a market town in 1251. Notable architecture includes: a parish church, parts of which are Norman, the Londesborough Arms (an 18th-century coaching inn), a Wesleyan chapel, a Methodist chapel and a high street still recognisable from the 19th century. Other sights of interest include the post office, the duck pond and Station Farm. Market Weighton history includes William Bradley, the Yorkshire Giant who at the age of 20 was 7 ft 9 in (2.36 m) tall.

In May of each year local residents take to the streets of Market Weighton for the Giant Community Day (formerly Giant Bradley Day) festival in a celebration of the life and times of William Bradley.

Industry in the town is largely based on agriculture. The town is known geologically for having given its name to the Market Weighton Axis.

The Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail, a long distance footpath, passes through the town.

Millington, East Riding of Yorkshire

Millington is a small village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) north-east of Pocklington.

The civil parish is formed by the village of Millington and the hamlets of Great Givendale and Ousethorpe.

According to the 2011 UK census, Millington parish had a population of 242, an increase on the 2001 UK census figure of 217.Nearby is Millington Woods and Millington Pastures. Millington Woods is one of the few remaining wooded dales in the Yorkshire Wolds. The woods includes Millington Springs, which formerly supported beds of watercress. Millington Pastures holds a stock of highland cattle, and is used for bike riding and walking.The church dedicated to St Margaret was designated a Grade I listed building in 1967 and is now recorded in the National Heritage List for England, maintained by Historic England.Millington has two public houses: The Gait Inn and The Ramblers Rest.

The Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail, a long distance footpath passes through the parish, to the east of the village.

In 1823 Millington was a village and civil parish in the Wapentake of Harthill and the Liberty of St Peter's. The eccesiastical parish living was under the patronage of the Dean of York. Population at the time was 282. Occupations included three farmers, a blacksmith, a wheelwright, a corn miller, a shopkeeper, and the landlord of The Gate public house. Resident were a school master, the parish vicar, and a gentleman.

Minster Way

The Minster Way is a 50-mile (80 km) walking route between the Minsters of Beverley and York. It crosses the chalk hills of the Yorkshire Wolds, as well as a wide variety of the East Riding of Yorkshire countryside. Part of the route follows the Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail across Sylvan Dale before diverting to Millington, Bishop Wilton and Stamford Bridge, where it follows the River Derwent into the Plain of York as far as the River Ouse.

The Minster Way links to other paths, namely the Beverley Twenty; Blackpool to Bridlington (Aerospace Way); Chalkland Way; East Riding Heritage Way; Jorvic Way; Trans Pennine Trail; Wilberforce Way and the Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail.

Paul Rose (TV presenter)

Paul Rose (born 1951) is a British television presenter who mainly works for the BBC.

Paul Rose is an accomplished diver, mountain climber and explorer whose skills and interests led to his role as a BBC documentary presenter

Rose made frequent expeditions to Antartica, supporting scientists engaged in research, and for 8 6-month seasons was base commander of Rothera Research Station.

In 2006, Paul Rose presented the 5-part BBC documentary entitled the Voyages of Discovery.

In 2017, Paul Rose presented a 2-part BBC documentary on the Yorkshire Wolds Way, a walk of around 80 miles from the Humber to Filey on the coast. During the programme, Rose explored the wildlife and geographical features of the landscape he encountered. In the second part of the documentary, Rose took a dramatic glider flight from the Wolds Gliding Club, Pocklington, over part of the Wolds Way.In 2018 he presented a four-part BBC One series The Lakes with Paul Rose about the English Lake District.

Potter Brompton

Potter Brompton is a small village in the English county of North Yorkshire, on the A64 road from Malton to Scarborough. The village is situated just a few hundred yards off the Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail and lies within the parish of Ganton.

Thixendale

Thixendale is a civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the East Riding of Yorkshire, it is located in the Yorkshire Wolds about 20 miles east of York.

The place-name 'Thixendale' is first attested in the Domesday Book of 1086, where it appears as Sixtendale and Xistendale. The name means 'Sigstein's dale or valley'. The name 'Sigstein' is also the source for the name of Sysonby in Leicestershire.The population of the village and surrounding farms is 130, rising to 293 at the 2011 census.The only pub, the Cross Keys, is a regular winner of local CAMRA awards.

The Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail, a long distance footpath passes to the east end of the village.

The church of St Mary, Thixendale is one of a group of village buildings constructed to designs by George Edmund Street in 1868–70. It was designated in 1966 by English Heritage as a Grade II* listed building. It is on the Sykes Churches Trail devised by the East Yorkshire Historic Churches Group.For many years until the late 1990s, television signals were blocked by the surrounding hills until a small transmitter was built, providing the village with terrestrial television for the first time. The transmitter ceased operation in the early 2000s, with villagers now relying on satellite TV and, since 2017, fast broadband.

Wintringham

Wintringham is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England. It is near the A64 road and 6 miles (9.7 km) east of Malton. Two long-distance footpaths, the Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail and the Centenary Way, pass through the village.

The deserted hamlet of Linton, to the south-east of Wintringham, was the probable birthplace of Lady Margaret Hoby, author of the earliest extant diary of a woman in English.

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