York—Simcoe

York—Simcoe is a federal electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 1968 to 1979, from 1988 to 1997 and since 2004.

It covers part of the region north of Toronto by Lake Simcoe.

It has existed on three separate occasions. Its first incarnation was created in 1966 from parts of Dufferin—Simcoe and York North. It existed until 1976 when it was split between York North, Simcoe South, and York—Peel.

It was reformed in 1987 from parts of Simcoe South, York—Peel, Victoria—Haliburton, and Wellington—Dufferin—Simcoe. It was again broken up in 1996 with a split between Barrie—Simcoe, Simcoe—Grey, and York North.

Its current incarnation came into being in 2003 made up of parts of Simcoe—Grey, York North, and Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford.

Its previous Member of Parliament was Peter Van Loan, the former Government House Leader. A by-election took place on February 25, 2019.[3]

York—Simcoe
Ontario electoral district
York—Simcoe 2015
York—Simcoe in relation to Southern Ontario ridings
Federal electoral district
LegislatureHouse of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Scot Davidson
Conservative
District created1966
First contested1968
Last contested25 February 2019
By-election
District webpageprofile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1]94,616
Electors (2015)74,911
Area (km²)[2]844
Pop. density (per km²)112.1
Census divisionsYork Region, Simcoe County
Census subdivisionsBradford West Gwillimbury, Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation, East Gwillimbury, Georgina, King

Boundaries

The riding consists of:

(a) that part of the Regional Municipality of York comprising

(i) the town of Georgina; and
(ii) the Town of East Gwillimbury, excepting that part lying southerly of Green Lane West and Green Lane East and westerly of Highway No. 404;
(iii) that part of the Township of King lying north of Highway No. 9 and Davis Drive West;

(b) Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation Indian Reserve; and

(c) that part of the County of Simcoe comprising the towns of Bradford West Gwillimbury.[4]

Riding associations

Riding associations are the local branches of the national political parties:

Party Association Name CEO HQ Address HQ City
  Christian Heritage Party of Canada York—Simcoe CHP Vicki Gunn 6 Morton Avenue Sharon
     Conservative Party of Canada York—Simcoe Conservative Association Kenneth H. Simpson RR1 1733 2nd Line Churchill
  Liberal Party of Canada York—Simcoe Federal Liberal Association Scott Crone 20822 Hwy 48, Mount Albert East Gwillimbury
  New Democratic Party York—Simcoe Federal NDP Riding Association Jessa McLean PO Box 1255 Sutton
Green
  People's Party of Canada People's Party of Canada York-Simcoe Riding Association
Progressive Canadian York—Simcoe PC Party Association Ronald Anderson 730 Davis Drive, Suite 200 Newmarket

History

It was originally created in 1966 from parts of Dufferin—Simcoe and York North ridings. It consisted of:

  • in the County of Simcoe, the townships of West Gwillimbury, Innisfil and Tecumseth excluding the City of Barrie and the Town of Alliston;
  • the Village of Cookstown; and
  • in the County of York, the Police Village of Maple, the Village of Stouffville, the Townships of East Gwillimbury, King, Whitchurch and the northern part of the Township of Vaughan lying north of a line drawn from Highway 11 west along Concession 1, south along the road between Concessions 1 and 2, west along County Suburban Road 25, south, west and north along the limit of the Police Village of Maple, west along County Suburban Road 25 to the township boundary.

The electoral district was abolished in 1976 when it was redistributed between Simcoe South, York North and York—Peel ridings.

It was recreated in 1987 from parts of Simcoe South, Victoria—Haliburton, Wellington—Dufferin—Simcoe and York—Peel ridings. The second incarnation of the riding consisted of:

  • in the County of Simcoe; the Town of Bradford, the villages of Beeton and Tottenham, and the townships of Adjala, Tecumseth and West Gwillimbury;
  • in the Regional Municipality of York: the towns of East Gwillimbury and Newmarket, Georgina Island Indian Reserve No. 33, the Township of Georgina, and the northern part of the Township of King.

The electoral district was abolished in 1996 when it was redistributed between Barrie—Simcoe, Simcoe—Grey and York North ridings.

It was recreated a second time in 2003 from parts of Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford, Simcoe—Grey and York North ridings with the current boundaries as described above.

This riding lost territory to Barrie—Innisfil and Newmarket—Aurora during the 2012 electoral redistribution.

A by-election in the riding has been called for February 25th, 2019. [5]

Members of Parliament

This riding has elected the following Members of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
York—Simcoe
Riding created from Dufferin—Simcoe and York North
28th  1968–1972     John Roberts Liberal
29th  1972–1974     Sinclair Stevens Progressive Conservative
30th  1974–1979
Riding dissolved into Simcoe South, York North,
York—Peel and Wellington—Dufferin—Simcoe
Riding re-created from Simcoe South, Victoria—Haliburton,
Wellington—Dufferin—Simcoe and York—Peel
34th  1988–1993     John Cole Progressive Conservative
35th  1993–1997     Karen Kraft Sloan Liberal
Riding dissolved into Barrie—Simcoe, Simcoe—Grey and York North
Riding re-created from Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford, Simcoe—Grey and York North
38th  2004–2006     Peter Van Loan Conservative
39th  2006–2008
40th  2008–2011
41st  2011–2015
42nd  2015–2018
 2019–Present Scot Davidson

Election results

2004–2018

2011 federal election redistributed results[9]
Party Vote %
  Conservative 24,624 63.67
  New Democratic 7,187 18.58
  Liberal 4,385 11.34
  Green 2,073 5.36
  Others 408 1.05

1968–1979

See also

References

  • "(Code 35104) Census Profile". 2011 census. Statistics Canada. 2012. Retrieved 2011-03-03.
  • (1966 - 1976) Riding history from the Library of Parliament
  • (1987 - 1996) Riding history from the Library of Parliament
  • (2003 - 2008) Riding history from the Library of Parliament
  • 2011 results from Elections Canada
  • Campaign expense data from Elections Canada

Notes

  1. ^ Statistics Canada: 2012
  2. ^ Statistics Canada: 2012
  3. ^ Zangouei, Aileen. "York-Simcoe byelection scheduled for Feb. 25". Georgina Advocate. Metroland News. Retrieved January 16, 2019.
  4. ^ "York-Simcoe". Elections Canada. Retrieved January 9, 2019.
  5. ^ https://www.thestar.com/politics/federal/2019/01/09/trudeau-calls-byelections-for-burnaby-south-yorksimcoe-and-outremont-for-feb-25.html
  6. ^ "February 25, 2019 By-elections Election Results". Elections Canada. February 28, 2019. Retrieved March 17, 2019.
  7. ^ Elections Canada – Confirmed candidates for York—Simcoe, 30 September 2015
  8. ^ Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates
  9. ^ Pundits' Guide to Canadian Elections

Coordinates: 44°14′24″N 79°32′29″W / 44.2400°N 79.5415°W

Anglican Diocese of Toronto

The Diocese of Toronto is an administrative division of the Anglican Church of Canada covering the central part of southern Ontario. It was founded in 1839 and is the oldest of the seven dioceses comprising the Ecclesiastical Province of Ontario. It has the most members of any Anglican diocese in Canada. It is also one of the biggest Anglican dioceses in the Americas in terms of numbers of parishioners, clergy and parishes. As of 2018, the diocese has around 230 congregations and ministries in 183 parishes, with approximately 54,000 Anglicans identified on parish rolls.In 1839, the area of the current Diocese of Toronto made up a fifth of what was then known as the Diocese of Upper Canada, which also comprised the current Dioceses of Huron, Ontario, Algoma and Niagara, which were respectively set apart in 1857, 1861, 1873 and 1875.The Cathedral Church of St. James in Toronto is the centre of the Diocese of Toronto. The church originated as The English Church when it was first erected in 1803. It later became the seat of the Anglican bishop and was reconsecrated as the Cathedral Church of St. James in 1830. The church remained under the direction of John Strachan for most of the early nineteenth century. He was buried on the cathedral grounds in 1867.

Barrie (electoral district)

Prior to the 2015 election Barrie was a federal electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 2004. It consisted of the City of Barrie in the County of Simcoe. It was created in 2003 when its predecessor, Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford, was redistributed. Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford consisted of the City of Barrie and the towns of Bradford West Gwillimbury and Innisfil. It had been formed in 1996 as Barrie—Simcoe from Simcoe Centre and York—Simcoe ridings, but its name was changed before an election was held.

Barrie—Innisfil

Barrie—Innisfil is a federal electoral district in Ontario. It encompasses a portion of Ontario previously included in the electoral districts of Barrie and York—Simcoe.

Barrie—Innisfil (provincial electoral district)

Barrie—Innisfil is a provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada. It elects one member to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. The riding was created in 2015 from portions of Barrie and York—Simcoe ridings, and it is congruent with the new federal riding of the same name.

Canadian federal election results in Central Ontario

Canadian federal elections have provided the following results in Central Ontario.

Caroline Mulroney

Caroline Anne Mulroney Lapham (born June 11, 1974) is a Canadian businesswoman, lawyer and politician who is currently serving as the Attorney General of Ontario and Minister Responsible for Francophone Affairs. She is the elected MPP for the riding of York—Simcoe in the 2018 election as a member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario and was a candidate in the 2018 Ontario Progressive Conservative Party leadership election, placing third.

Mulroney grew up in Ottawa, before being educated at Harvard University and the New York University School of Law. She lived and worked in the United States for 12 years until 2005 when she returned to Canada, worked in financial services and became involved in charitable work. She also served on the board of directors of the Windsor–Detroit Bridge Authority.

Mulroney is the only daughter and eldest child of the 18th Prime Minister of Canada, Brian Mulroney, and his wife Mila Mulroney. She is also a naturalized citizen of the United States.

Dufferin—Simcoe

Dufferin—Simcoe was a federal electoral district represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 1925 to 1968. It was located in the province of Ontario. This riding was created in 1924 from parts of Dufferin and Simcoe South ridings.

It initially consisted of the county of Dufferin and that part of the county of Simcoe lying south of and including the townships of Tossorontio, Essa and Innisfil. In 1933, it was redefined to exclude the townships of East Luther and East Garafraxa in the county of Dufferin, and no part of the town of Barrie.

In 1947, it was defined as consisting of the county of Dufferin, including the town of Orangeville, but excluding the townships of East Luther and East Garafraxa, and the part of the county of Simcoe lying south of and including the townships of Tosorontio, Essa and Innisfil, and excluding the town of Barrie.

In 1952, it was defined as consisting of the county of Dufferin and the town of Orangeville, and the part of the county of Simcoe lying south of and including the townships of Tosorontio, Essa and Innisfil (excluding the town of Barrie).

The electoral district was abolished in 1966 when it was redistributed between Peel—Dufferin, Simcoe North, Wellington—Grey and York—Simcoe ridings.

George Elliott (bishop)

George Elliott, MDiv (b 1949) is a retired Canadian Suffragan Bishop: he was in charge of the York-Simcoe area of the Diocese of Toronto from 2001 until 2013.

Julia Munro

Julia Munro (born c. 1942) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. She was a Progressive Conservative member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1995 until 2018. She represented the riding of York—Simcoe.

Ontario Minor Hockey Association

The Ontario Minor Hockey Association (OMHA) is a major ice hockey governing body at the minor level. The OMHA is empowered by the Ontario Hockey Federation and Hockey Canada. The OMHA oversees minor hockey from Initiation to Juvenile throughout the majority of southern Ontario. There are two "AAA" leagues, the Eastern AAA Hockey League and the South-Central Triple A Hockey League as well as four "AA" leagues in the York-Simcoe AA League, Tri-County AA League, Lakeshore League and the Bluewater League. The OMHA also has six "A" leagues in the Bluewater League, Niagara District League, Tri-County A League, York-Simcoe A League and the Lakeshore League.

The OMHA also has several representative leagues from the BB-E representative classifications such as the Shamrock League, Georgian Bay-Muskoka League, Southern Counties League, Western Ontario Athletic Association, Victoria Durham League and the Eastern Ontario League.

In addition, there are also 14 "Local Leagues" under the OMHA auspices as well as approximately 175 House Leagues among its 230 member Associations.

The Ontario Minor Hockey Association, founded in 1935, is the largest minor hockey association in the world and oversees a participant base of 300,000 consisting of players, coaches, trainers, officials, hockey volunteers and parents across the province. The OMHA has 230 active member minor hockey associations and annually coordinates 31 leagues and approximately 600 development clinics throughout Ontario.

Peter Van Loan

Peter Van Loan (born April 18, 1963) is a former Canadian politician who served as the Member of Parliament for the electoral district of York—Simcoe from 2004 to 2018. He was the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons from 2007 to 2008 and again from 2011 to 2015.

Scot Davidson

Scot Davidson is a Canadian politician, who was elected to the House of Commons of Canada in a by-election on February 25, 2019. He represents the electoral district of York—Simcoe as a member of the Conservative Party of Canada.

Simcoe South

Simcoe South was a federal electoral district represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 1867 to 1925, and from 1979 to 1988. It was located north of Toronto in the province of Ontario. It was initially created by the British North America Act of 1867 when the County of Simcoe was divided into two ridings, to be called the South and North Ridings in the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada.

The South Riding consisted of the Townships of West Gwillimbury, Tecumseh, Innisfil, Essa, Tossorontio, Mulmur, and the Village of Bradford.

In 1882, the electoral district of the County of Simcoe was divided into three ridings. The South Riding consisted of the townships of Mulmur, Tossorontio, Essa, Innisfil, and Tecumseth, and the village of Alliston.

In 1903, the south riding was redefined to consist of the townships of Adjala, Essa, Gwillimbury West, Innisfil, Tecumseth and Tossorontio, the towns of Alliston and Barrie, and the villages of Beeton, Bradford and Tottenham.

The electoral district was abolished in 1924 when it was incorporated into Dufferin—Simcoe riding.

It was recreated in 1976 from parts of Grey—Simcoe, Peel—Dufferin—Simcoe and York—Simcoe ridings. It consisted of the City of Barrie and the Townships of Essa, Flos, Innisfil, Tecumseth, Vespra and West Gwillimbury, but excluding the Towns of Alliston and Wasaga Beach.

The electoral district was abolished in 1987 when it was redistributed between Simcoe Centre, Simcoe North and York—Simcoe ridings.

Simcoe—Grey

Simcoe—Grey is a federal electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 1997.

It was created in 1996 from parts of Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford, Bruce—Grey, Simcoe Centre, Simcoe North, Wellington—Grey—Dufferin—Simcoe and York—Simcoe.

It consists of the municipalities of Blue Mountains, Collingwood, Clearview, Wasaga Beach, Springwater, Essa, New Tecumseth and Adjala-Tosorontio. It had a population of 117,505 in 2001, and an area of 2,515 km².

Simcoe—Grey (provincial electoral district)

Simcoe—Grey is a provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1999.

It was created in 1996 from parts of Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford, Bruce—Grey, Simcoe Centre, Simcoe North, Wellington—Grey—Dufferin—Simcoe and York—Simcoe.

It consists of the municipalities of Blue Mountains, Collingwood, Clearview, Wasaga Beach, Springwater, Essa, New Tecumseth and Adjala-Tosorontio. It had a population of 117,505 in 2001, and an area of 2,515 km².

Wellington—Dufferin—Simcoe

Wellington—Dufferin—Simcoe was a federal electoral district represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 1979 to 1988. It was located in the province of Ontario. This riding was created in 1976 as Dufferin—Wellington and renamed in 1977. It was created from parts of Halton, Peel—Dufferin—Simcoe and Wellington—Grey—Dufferin—Waterloo ridings.

It consisted of the County of Dufferin, the Townships of Adjala and Tosorontio and the Town of Alliston in the County of Simcoe, and Townships of Arthur, Erin, Maryborough, Minto, Nichol, Peel, West Garafraxa and West Luther, including the Towns of Mount Forest and Palmerston in the County of Wellington.

The electoral district was abolished in 1987 when it was redistributed between Guelph—Wellington, Perth—Wellington—Waterloo, Simcoe Centre, Wellington—Grey—Dufferin—Simcoe and York—Simcoe ridings.

York North

York North was a federal riding in Ontario, Canada, that was in the House of Commons of Canada from Confederation in 1867 until 2004.

The federal riding was eliminated in 2003 when it was redistributed between two new ridings of Newmarket—Aurora and York—Simcoe. Another small section was incorporated into Oak Ridges—Markham. The riding covered the northern suburbs of the city of Toronto often including such towns as Aurora, Vaughan, Newmarket, Richmond Hill and Markham. The borders changed often, however, most notably in 1996 when the riding was so altered that it contained very little of the same territory as before.

York—Peel

York—Peel was a federal electoral district represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 1979 to 1988. It was located in the province of Ontario. This riding was created in 1976 from parts of Peel—Dufferin—Simcoe, York North and York—Simcoe ridings. It was represented in the House of Commons by Sinclair Stevens of the Progressive Conservative Party during its whole existence.

York—Peel consisted of the Town of Caledon in Peel Region, and the Townships of East Gwillimbury and King and the Towns of Aurora, Newmarket and Whitchurch–Stouffville in York Region.

The electoral district was abolished in 1987 when it was re-distributed between Halton—Peel, Markham, York North and York—Simcoe ridings.

York—Simcoe (provincial electoral district)

York—Simcoe is a provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since the 2007 provincial election.

It covers part of the region north of Toronto by Lake Simcoe. The riding includes the municipalities of Bradford West Gwillimbury, East Gwillimbury, Georgina and King north of Regional Road 31. It also includes the community of the Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation Indian Reserve.

The provincial electoral district was created in 1999 when provincial ridings were defined to have the same borders as federal ridings.

Canadian federal by-election, February 25, 2019
Resignation of Peter Van Loan
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Scot Davidson 8,929 53.91 Increase3.66
Liberal Shaun Tanaka 4,811 29.04 Decrease8.72
New Democratic Jessa McLean 1,244 7.51 Decrease1.38
Progressive Canadian Dorian Baxter 634 3.83 --
Green Mathew Lund 451 2.72 Decrease0.37
People's Robert Geurts 314 1.90 --
Libertarian Keith Dean Komar 95 0.57 --
Independent John The Engineer Turmel 64 0.39 --
National Citizens Alliance Adam Suhr 22 0.13 --
Total valid votes/Expense limit 16,564 99.43
Total rejected ballots 95 0.57 +0.09
Turnout 16,659 20.03 -43.23
Eligible voters 83,179
Conservative hold Swing +6.19
Source: Elections Canada[6]
Canadian federal election, 2015
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Peter Van Loan 24,058 50.25 Decrease13.42 $138,801.13
Liberal Shaun Tanaka 18,083 37.77 Increase26.43 $62,296.23
New Democratic Sylvia Gerl 4,255 8.89 Decrease9.69 $12,736.48
Green Mark Viitala 1,483 3.1 Decrease2.26
Total valid votes/Expense limit 47,879 100.0     $208,120.39
Total rejected ballots 232 0.48 Increase0.08
Turnout 48,111 63.66 Increase5.06
Eligible voters 75,570
Source: Elections Canada[7][8]
Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Peter Van Loan 33,614 63.6 +6.9
New Democratic Sylvia Gerl 10,190 19.3 +7.1
Liberal Cynthia Wesley-Esquimaux 5,702 10.8 -7.9
Green John Dewar 2,851 5.4 -4.7
Christian Heritage Vicki Gunn 352 0.7 -0.2
United Paul Pisani 157 0.3
Total valid votes/Expense limit 52,866 100.0
Total rejected ballots 201 0.4
Turnout 53,067 58.6
Eligible voters 90,552
Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Peter Van Loan 27,412 56.7 +8.8 $89,302
Liberal Judith Moses 9,044 18.7 -12.0 $63,431
New Democratic Sylvia Gerl 5,882 12.2 -1.1 $7,414
Green John Dewar 4,887 10.1 +3.2 $10,646
Progressive Canadian Paul Pisani 676 1.4 $5,640
Christian Heritage Vicki Gunn 444 0.9 -0.2 $7,287
Total valid votes/Expense limit 48,345 100.0 $89,500
Canadian federal election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Peter Van Loan 25,685 47.9 +2.7
Liberal Kate Wilson 16,456 30.7 -4.8
New Democratic Sylvia Gerl 7,139 13.3 +2.1
Green John Dewar 3,719 6.9 +1.5
Christian Heritage Vicki Gunn 595 1.1 -0.1
Total valid votes 53,594 100.0
Canadian federal election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Conservative Peter Van Loan 21,343 45.2
Liberal Kate Wilson 16,763 35.5
New Democratic Sylvia Gerl 5,314 11.2
Green Bob Burrows 2,576 5.5
Progressive Canadian Stephen Sircelj 670 1.4
Christian Heritage Vicki Gunn 588 1.2
Total valid votes 47,254 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1993
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Karen Kraft Sloan 26,972 38.9 +3.8
Reform Paul Pivato 22,325 32.2
Progressive Conservative John E. Cole 16,139 23.3 -23.9
New Democratic Steve Pliakes 1,768 2.5 -10.7
Christian Heritage Ian Knight 958 1.4 -2.5
National Ronald Fletcher 673 1.0
Natural Law Ian Roberts 416 0.6
Abolitionist Gary George Brewer 95 0.1
Total valid votes 69,346 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1988
Party Candidate Votes %
Progressive Conservative John E. Cole 26,732 47.2
Liberal Frank Stronach 19,906 35.1
New Democratic Judy Darcy 7,489 13.2
Christian Heritage Klass Stel 2,203 3.9
Libertarian Maureen E. McAleese 335 0.6
Total valid votes 56,665 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1974
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Sinclair Stevens 23,591 47.0 +1.3
Liberal Mike Willinsky 18,927 37.7 -0.5
New Democratic Wally Gustar 7,630 15.2 -0.8
Total valid votes 50,148 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1972
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Sinclair Stevens 22,957 45.7 +8.4
Liberal John Roberts 19,178 38.2 -7.1
New Democratic Wally Gustar 8,046 16.0 -1.3
Total valid votes 50,181 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1968
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberal John Roberts 15,906 45.3
Progressive Conservative Wallace McCutcheon 13,100 37.3
New Democratic Don McFadyen 6,095 17.4
Total valid votes 35,101 100.0
Federal ridings in Central Ontario
Conservative
Liberal
City of Toronto
(Suburbs & Downtown)
Southern Halton,
Hamilton and Niagara
Cities of Brampton & Mississauga
Southern Durham & York
Ottawa
Central Ontario
Eastern Ontario
Northern Ontario
Midwestern Ontario
Southwestern Ontario
Historical federal ridings in Ontario
Until 2015
Until 2006
Until 2004
Until 2000
Until 1997
Until 1993
Until 1988
Until 1984
Until 1979
Until 1974
Until 1972
Until 1968
Until 1953
Until 1949
Until 1935
Until 1925
Until 1917
Until 1904
Until 1896
Until 1882

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.