Yellow giant

A yellow giant is a luminous giant star of low or intermediate mass (roughly 0.5–11 solar masses (M)) in a late phase of its stellar evolution. The outer atmosphere is inflated and tenuous, making the radius large and the surface temperature as low as 5,200-7500 K. The appearance of the yellow giant is from white to yellow, including the spectral types F and G. About 10.6 percent of all giant stars are yellow giants.

36 Aquarii

36 Aquarii (abbreviated 36 Aqr) is a yellow giant star or subgiant star in the constellation of Aquarius. 36 Aquarii is its Flamsteed designation. It is approximately 520 light-years from Earth.

36 Persei

36 Persei is a variable star in the constellation Perseus. Its apparent magnitude is 5.32. Located around 36.32 parsecs (118.5 ly) distant, it is a yellow giant of spectral type F4III, a star that has used up its core hydrogen and is likely evolving to become a red giant.

49 Cassiopeiae

49 Cassiopeiae is a binary star system in the constellation Cassiopeia, approximately 430 light years away from Earth. The main star, 5th magnitude 49 Cassiopeiae A, is a yellow giant star of the spectral type G8III. It is in the same temperature range as the Sun, 5,000 to 6,000 kelvins. It is many times larger and more luminous. Its companion, 12th magnitude 49 Cassiopeiae B, is much fainter and of an unknown spectral type.

54 Persei

54 Persei is a class G8III (yellow giant) star in the constellation Perseus. Its apparent magnitude is 4.93 and it is approximately 218 light years away based on parallax.It has one distant companion, B< at separation 93" and magnitude 13.0.

71 Ophiuchi

71 Ophiuchi is a class G8III (yellow giant) star in the constellation Ophiuchus. Its apparent magnitude is 4.64 and it is approximately 273 light years away based on parallax.

74 Ophiuchi

74 Ophiuchi is a class G8III (yellow giant) star in the constellation Ophiuchus. Its apparent magnitude is 4.85 and it is approximately 261 light years away based on parallax.The primary has two reported companions: B, with magnitude 12.08 and separation 27.5", and C, with magnitude 12.28 and separation 57.9".

9 Aquarii

9 Aquarii (abbreviated 9 Aqr) is a yellow giant with a spectral type of G8III and an apparent magnitude of 6.55 in the constellation Aquarius. 9 Aquarii is the Flamsteed designation.

Agastache nepetoides

Agastache nepetoides, the yellow giant hyssop, is a perennial flower native to the United States and Canada. It is a member of the Lamiaceae family.

HD 15920

HD 15920 is a 5th magnitude star in the constellation Cassiopeia, approximately 260 light years away from Earth. It is a yellow giant star of the spectral type G8III, meaning its surface temperature is in the same range as our Sun, 5,000 to 6,000 kelvins. It is much bigger and more luminous than the Sun.

HD 165634

HD 165634 is a class G7III (yellow giant) star in the constellation Sagittarius. Its apparent magnitude is 4.56 and it is approximately 339 light years away based on parallax.

HD 175740

HD 175740, BD+41°3177B and BD+41° 3177C are components of a double star in the constellation Lyra, approximately 270 light years away from Earth. The most luminous star, 5th magnitude HD 175740, is a yellow giant star of the spectral type G8III. It therefore has a surface temperature of 5,000 to 6,000 kelvins, in the same range as that of our Sun, though it is much larger and brighter in comparison. BD+41°3177B is a 13th magnitude star of an unknown spectral type.

HD 18970

HD 18970 is a class G9.5III (yellow giant) star in the constellation Perseus. Its apparent magnitude is 4.77 and it is approximately 211 light years away based on parallax.

HR 5955

HR 5955 is an orange giant star, type K1.5III CN1, in the far southern constellation of Apus. Its distance of 288 light-years gives it an apparent visual magnitude of 5.70.

HR 5955 is 28.5 minutes earlier than and about 5 deg. north of the yellow giant star Gamma Apodis, which is the second brightest star in the constellation of Apus.

Kepler-6

Kepler-6 is a yellow giant situated in the constellation Cygnus. The star lies within the field of view of the Kepler Mission, which discovered it as part of a NASA-led mission to discover Earth-like planets. The star, which is slightly larger, more metal-rich, slightly cooler, and more massive than the Sun, is orbited by at least one extrasolar planet, a Jupiter-sized planet named Kepler-6b that orbits closely to its star.

Lambda Pegasi

Lambda Pegasi (λ Peg, λ Pegasi) is a fourth-magnitude star in the constellation Pegasus.

λ Pegasi is a yellow giant with stellar classification G8II-III. With a mass of 1.5 M☉ and radius that is 28.5 R☉, the star boasts a bolometric luminosity that is roughly 390 L☉. Its apparent magnitude was calibrated in 1983 at 3.96, yielding an intrinsic brightness of -1.45. Parallax calculations place the star at a distance of roughly 112 parsecs from Earth, or 365 ± 10 light years away, about three times the distance of its line-of-sight double μ Pegasi.

In the constellation, Lambda and Mu lie to the southwest of Beta Pegasi, the nearest bright star.

Microscopium

Microscopium ("the Microscope") is a minor constellation in the southern celestial hemisphere, one of twelve created in the 18th century by French astronomer Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille and one of several depicting scientific instruments. The name is a Latinised form of the Greek word for microscope. Its stars are faint and hardly visible from most of the non-tropical Northern Hemisphere.

The constellation's brightest star is Gamma Microscopii of apparent magnitude 4.68, a yellow giant 2.5 times the Sun's mass located 223 ± 8 light-years distant. It passed within 1.14 and 3.45 light-years of the Sun some 3.9 million years ago, possibly disturbing the outer Solar System. Two star systems—WASP-7 and HD 205739—have been determined to have planets, while two others—the young red dwarf star AU Microscopii and the sunlike HD 202628—have debris disks. AU Microscopii and the binary red dwarf system AT Microscopii are probably a wide triple system and members of the Beta Pictoris moving group. Nicknamed "Speedy Mic", BO Microscopii is a star with an extremely fast rotation period of 9 hours, 7 minutes.

Phi Ophiuchi

Phi Ophiuchi (φ Oph) is a class G8+IIIa (yellow giant) star in the constellation Ophiuchus. Its apparent magnitude is 4.27 and it is approximately 244 light years away based on parallax.It is a multiple star with two companions, B, at magnitude 12.9 and separation 41.3", and C, at magnitude 10.8 and separation 119.8".

Pi1 Pegasi

Pi1 Pegasi (π1 Pegasi) is a star in the constellation Pegasus. Of apparent magnitude 5.59, its brightness is dimmer by 0.05 magnitude due to interstellar extinction. It is a yellow giant 1.92 times as massive as the Sun and 201.6 times as luminous. Based upon changes to the proper motion of the visible component, this is a probable astrometric binary.

Triangulum Minus

Triangulum Minus (Latin for the Smaller Triangle) was a constellation created by Johannes Hevelius. Its name is sometimes wrongly written as Triangulum Minor. It was formed from the southern parts of his Triangula (plural form of Triangulum), but is no longer in use. The triangle was defined by the fifth-magnitude stars 6 Trianguli, 10 Trianguli, and 12 Trianguli.Also known as TZ Trianguli, 6 Trianguli is a multiple star system with a combined magnitude of 4.7, whose main component is a yellow giant of spectral type G5III.

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