Yellow-throated leaflove

The yellow-throated leaflove (Atimastillas flavicollis) is a species of leaflove in the bulbul family of passerine birds. It is the only species of the monotypic genus Atimastillas. The yellow-throated leaflove is found in western and central Africa. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, moist savanna, and subtropical or tropical moist shrubland.

Yellow-throated leaflove
Yellow-throated leaflove (Atimastillas flavicollis flavigula)
Lake Bunyonyi, Uganda
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Pycnonotidae
Genus: Atimastillas
Oberholser, 1905
Species:
A. flavicollis
Binomial name
Atimastillas flavicollis
(Swainson, 1837)
Atimastillas flavicollis distribution map
Synonyms
  • Chlorocichla flavicollis
  • Criniger flavicollis
  • Haematornis flavicollis
  • Ixus flavicollis
  • Pycnonotus flavicollis
  • Trichophorus flavicollis
  • Xenocichla flavicollis

Taxonomy and systematics

The yellow-throated leaflove was originally described in the genus Haematornis (a synonym for Pycnonotus) and later classified within Chlorocichla before being moved to the genus Atimastillas in 2010.[2] Not all authorities have adopted this latest genus change. Formerly, various authorities have classified the yellow-throated leaflove in several other genera, including Criniger, Ixus and Xenocichla (a synonym for Bleda).[3] Alternatively, some authorities have classified the yellow-throated leaflove as synonymous with the yellow-throated greenbul.[4] Alternate names for the yellow-throated leaflove include the mango bulbul, yellowthroat and yellow-throated greenbul. The alternate name 'yellowthroat' is not to be confused with the species of the genus Geothlypis.

Subspecies

Three subspecies are recognized:[5]

  • A. f. flavicollis - (Swainson, 1837): Found from Senegal and Gambia to northern Cameroon and north-western Central African Republic
  • Bosum yellow-throated greenbul (A. f. soror) - (Neumann, 1914): Also named the Congo white-throated leaflove. Found from central Cameroon to west-central Ethiopia and central Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Uganda yellow-throated greenbul (A. f. flavigula) - (Cabanis, 1880): Originally described as a separate species in the genus Trichophorus (a synonym for Criniger) and Xenocichla (a synonym for Bleda). Found from Angola, south-eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo to Uganda, western Kenya and western Tanzania

References

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2016). "Atimastillas flavicollis". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2016: e.T103817373A94351634. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-3.RLTS.T103817373A94351634.en. Retrieved 15 January 2018.
  2. ^ "Taxonomy Version 2 « IOC World Bird List". www.worldbirdnames.org. Retrieved 2017-04-16.
  3. ^ Catalogue of the Birds in the British Museum: Passeriformes, or perching birds. Cichlomorphœ: pt. III-IV, containing the ... family Timeliidœ (babbling-thrushes) by R.B. Sharpe. order of the Trustees. 1881-01-01.
  4. ^ "Atimastillas flavicollis - Avibase". avibase.bsc-eoc.org. Retrieved 2017-04-16.
  5. ^ "Bulbuls « IOC World Bird List". www.worldbirdnames.org. Retrieved 2017-04-16.
Bristlebill

The bristlebills are a genus of passerine birds belonging to the genus Bleda in the bulbul family, Pycnonotidae. They are found in the understorey of forests in western and central Africa. They forage for insects at or near ground-level, often near water. They will follow driver ant swarms to catch prey items fleeing from the ants and they frequently join mixed-species feeding flocks.

They are 18–23 cm long with fairly long, stout bills. The upperparts are mainly green-brown while the underparts are yellow. The birds have whistling songs.

The nest is made of leaves or sticks and built in a shrub or small tree. Two eggs are laid.

Bulbul

The bulbuls are a family, Pycnonotidae, of medium-sized passerine songbirds. Many forest species are known as greenbuls, brownbuls, leafloves, or bristlebills. The family is distributed across most of Africa and into the Middle East, tropical Asia to Indonesia, and north as far as Japan. Bulbuls homeland is Iraq . A few insular species occur on the tropical islands of the Indian Ocean There are over 150 species in 27 genera. While some species are found in most habitats, the African species are predominantly found in rainforest. Rainforest species are rare in Asia, however, with Asian bulbuls preferring more open areas.

Chlorocichla

Chlorocichla is a genus of songbird in the bulbul family, Pycnonotidae.

Criniger

Criniger is a genus of songbirds in the bulbul family, Pycnonotidae. The species of Criniger are found in western and central Africa.

Ixos

Ixos is a paraphyletic songbird genus in the bulbul family, Pycnonotidae.

Kasanka National Park

Kasanka National Park is a park located in the Serenje District of Zambia’s Central Province. At roughly 390 km2 (150 sq mi), Kasanka is one of Zambia’s smallest national parks. Kasanka was the first of Zambia’s national parks to be managed by a private-public partnership. The privately funded Kasanka Trust Ltd has been in operation since 1986 and undertakes all management responsibilities, in partnership with the Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW - previously ZAWA). The park has an average elevation between 1,160 m (3,810 ft) and 1,290 m (4,230 ft) above mean sea level. It has a number permanent shallow lakes and water bodies with the largest being Wasa. There are five perennial rivers in the park, with the largest being the Luwombwa River. The Luwombwa is the only river that drains the NP, which flows out in the northwestern corner. It is a tributary of the Luapula, which further upstream also drains the Bangweulu Swamp and forms the main source of the Congo River. Although Kasanka NP is part of the Greater Bangweulu Ecosystem, there is no direct hydrological connection between the park and the Bangweulu Wetlands.

A total of 114 mammal species have been recorded in the park including elephant, hippopotamus and sitatunga. A number of species have been reintroduced in the park by Kasanka Trust - the most successful of which are zebra and buffalo. Close to ten million Eidolon helvum (African straw-coloured fruit bat) migrate to the Mushitu swamp evergreen forest in the park for three months during October to December, making it the largest mammal migration in the world. Over 471 bird species have been identified in the park.

Leaflove

Leaflove may refer to:

African leaflove, alternate name for a species of bird found in western and central Africa

Common leaflove, alternate name for a species of bird found in western and central Africa

Congo white-throated leaflove, alternate name for a subspecies of bird found in western and central Africa

Gabon leaflove, a subspecies of bird found in western and central Africa

Plain leaflove, alternate name for a species of bird found in western and central Africa

Red-tailed leaflove, a species of bird found in western and central Africa

Simple leaflove, alternate name for a species of bird found in western and central Africa

Uele leaflove, a subspecies of bird found in western and central Africa

Yellow-throated leaflove, a species of bird found in western and central Africa

List of bird genera

List of bird genera concerns the chordata class of aves or birds, characterised by feathers, a beak with no teeth, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, and a high metabolic rate.

List of birds of Burkina Faso

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Burkina Faso. The avifauna of Burkina Faso include a total of 499 species, of which seven are rare or accidental. One species listed is extirpated in Burkina Faso and is not included in the species count.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families, and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Accidental species are included in the total species count for Burkina Faso.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Burkina Faso

(Ex) Extirpated - a species that no longer occurs in Burkina Faso although populations exist elsewhere

List of birds of Burundi

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Burundi. The avifauna of Burundi include a total of 690 species, of which 1 has been introduced by humans and 2 are rare or accidental. 7 species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Burundi.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Burundi

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Burundi as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of Equatorial Guinea

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Equatorial Guinea. The avifauna of Equatorial Guinea include a total of 835 species, of which three are rare or accidental.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Accidental species are included in the total species count for Equatorial Guinea.

The following tag has been used to highlight accidentals. The commonly occurring native species are untagged.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Equatorial Guinea

List of birds of Guinea-Bissau

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Guinea-Bissau. The avifauna of Guinea-Bissau include a total of 470 species, of which one is rare or accidental.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Accidental species are included in the total species count for Guinea-Bissau.

The following tag has been used to highlight accidentals. The commonly occurring native species are untagged.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Guinea-Bissau

List of birds of Mali

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Mali. The avifauna of Mali include a total of 606 species, of which one is endemic and nine are rare or accidental.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Accidental species are included in the total species count for Mali.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Mali

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Mali

List of birds of Senegal

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Senegal. The avifauna of Senegal include a total of 664 species. One of these species has been introduced by humans. Eight other species are rare or accidental. One species listed is extirpated in Senegal and is not included in the species count. Seven species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Senegal.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories, but not all species fall into one of these categories. Those that do not are commonly occurring native species.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Senegal

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Senegal as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(Ex) Extirpated - a species that no longer occurs in Senegal although populations exist elsewhere

List of birds of Zambia

This is a list of bird species recorded in Zambia. The avifauna of Zambia include a total of 779 species, of which one is endemic, one has been introduced by humans and four are rare or accidental. Eleven species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Zambia.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Zambia

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Zambia

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Zambia as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of the Gambia

This is a list of the bird species recorded in the Gambia. The avifauna of the Gambia include a total of 576 species, one of which has been introduced by humans and two of which are globally threatened. The country, which is very small and almost completely surrounded by Senegal, has no endemic species.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. Not all species will fall into one of these categories. Those that do not are commonly occurring native species.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in the Gambia

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to the Gambia as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

Pycnonotus

Pycnonotus is a paraphyletic genus of songbird in the bulbul family (Pycnonotidae).

Yellow-throated greenbul

The yellow-throated greenbul (Arizelocichla chlorigula) is a species of the bulbul family of passerine birds. It is an African species found in east-central and southern Tanzania.

Yellowthroat

The yellowthroats are New World warblers in the genus Geothlypis. Most members of the group have localised ranges in Mexico and Central America, but the masked yellowthroat has an extensive South American distribution, and common yellowthroat, the only migratory species in the group, breeds over much of North America.

All the yellowthroats have similar plumage, with yellow-green upperparts, yellow breast, and a mainly black bill. The adult male has a black facemask of variable extent, usually bordered above with a grey band. The female is similar, but lacks the black mask, and may be duller in plumage.

The breeding habitat of these warblers is typically marshes and other wet areas with dense low vegetation. The eggs, two in most species, but up to five for common yellowthroat, are laid in a lined cup nest low in grass or rank vegetation.

Yellowthroat are usually seen in pairs, and do not associate with other species. They are often skulking, and feed on a range of insects.

The taxonomy of these closely related species is complicated, and it is sometimes difficult to define which forms merit species status. For example common yellowthroat, Belding's yellowthroat, Altamira yellowthroat, and Bahama yellowthroat are sometimes considered conspecific. Conversely masked yellowthroat can be split to three or even four species. The name 'yellowthroat' is sometimes used as an alternate name for the yellow-throated leaflove.The geographical isolation of the various populations of this mainly sedentary group has led to its genetic divergence and speciation. This process can be seen in action in the case of masked yellowthroat, where the subspecies are separated by rainforest or the Andes, leading to the development of distinctive forms, such as the Central American race Geothlypis aequinoctialis chiriquensis. This form is found in the highlands of Costa Rica and western Panama, and is separated by 1000 km from its South American cousins, from which it differs in size, appearance and vocalisations.

To further confuse this group, the Kentucky warbler, mourning warbler, and MacGillivray's warbler have been added to this group.

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