Yellow-bellied weasel

The yellow-bellied weasel (Mustela kathiah) is a species of weasel. It lives in the pine forests of Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam. The yellow-bellied weasel is rated "Least Concern" by the IUCN Red List. The yellow-bellied weasel is named for its yellow-colored underbelly. The top of its body and the tail are dark brown. Yellow-bellied weasels have a body length of 9.8-10.6 inches (25–27 cm.) and a tail length of 4.9-5.9 inches (12.5–15 cm.). The tail is about half the length of the body. Yellow-bellied weasels weigh approximately 3.3 pounds (1.5 kg.).

Yellow-bellied weasels eat birds, mice, rats, voles, and other small mammals.

Researchers believe that the reproductive behavior of the yellow-bellied weasel is similar to that of the short-tailed weasel (Mustela erminea). Yellow-bellied weasels first build a den in the ground. Breeding occurs annually. Mating occurs in late spring or early summer. Females are pregnant for about ten months. The female gives birth to 3-18 kits in April or May. By the time the kits are eight weeks old, they are ready to go out and hunt on their own.

The yellow bellied weasel is an interesting animal that travels through most of the Thailand north countries. Most of the records came from hill evergreen Forrest and/or distributed habitats at elevations above 1,400 m. There are several characteristics of the yellow bellied weasel that are useful in distinguishing it from other weasel species. The basic color pattern of a yellow bellied weasel is rich mid-to dark brown above and yellowish to rich yellow below. It has a broad yellow patch from its throat extending past the front legs and along the venter (what is venter? is the underside or abdomen of an animal.) The yellow bellied weasel has a minimum head and body (165–280 mm). The tail is longer relatively to the head-body length.

Behavior of the yellow bellied weasel. The yellow bellied weasel roams by itself and doesn’t tend to travel with a pack (http://www.siamese-hertiag.org/nhbsspdf). It hunts and looks for food, it usually eats…..eat mostly rodents such as mice, rats, and voles. They will also eat birds and small mammals (Nowak and Paradiso 1983; Jha 1999) A yellow bellied weasel was once spotted with a frog in its mouth as it was seen it dropped the frog and then came back but didn’t eat it while being spotted (http://www.siamese-hertiag.org/nhbsspdf).

The Yellow Bellied Weasel (Mustela kathiah) is known to be in the countries of Bhutan, Burma, China, India, Laos, Nepal, Pakistan, Thailand and Vietnam.[2] (The Website of Everything) The Yellow Bellied Weasel is a hill dwelling species, found between 1,000 m and 2,000 m in elevation; in winter it may come down lower than 1,000m. The Yellow Bellied Weasel is known throughout Asia but very little is known about its biology and ecology due to its inaccessible habitat. There are records of the Yellow-bellied Weasel being sighted in Northern India in Sangrachu and Mokokchaung in the Naga Hills known to Pocock (1941). It has been recorded from Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Meghalaya, Assam and Maniput (Choudury 1999) and there is a historical specimen form Mizoram: a skinless skull of a female collected in the Lushai Hills, Sangao, on 17 February 1953 by W N Koelz, and held in the Field Field Museum Chicago, USA; specimen n0 75807 (Shoudhury 2001; L.R. Heaney in litt. 2008).[3] Despite the sightings in India there is still little know about the Yellow Bellied Weasel.

The Weasel is a small-sized carnivorous mammal that is found on every continent with the exception of Australia and its surrounding islands, along with the more hostile polar regions. Weasels have also been introduced to other countries (mainly as a form of pest control) like New Zealand and a number of other islands. However, like the introduction of a number of small predators to such isolated places, Weasels have had a profound effect on native wildlife which has evolved in the same way for millions of years without the threat of small, terrestrial carnivores. The ferocious and greedy nature of the Weasel coupled with the thought they transmit disease to farm animals e.g. TB has led to them getting a bad reputation amongst farmers particularly who trap and kill them to prevent further loss of livestock. They have however, been introduced to countries where they are not naturally found due to their versatile and dominant nature as a form of natural pest control. Along with a number of native British species, Weasels are often found as characters in books and appear in children's songs.[4]

Interesting fact about the Yellow-bellied weasels the females are called 'bitch, doe or jill' and males 'buck, dog, hub or jack'. A yellowbellied weasel group is called a 'boogle'.

There are two subspecies of the yellow-bellied weasel:

Mustela kathiah caporiaccoi
Mustela kathiah kathiah
Yellow-bellied weasel
Yellow bellied weasel, Shillong, India
At Shillong, Meghalaya, India
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
Order:
Family:
Genus:
Species:
M. kathiah
Binomial name
Mustela kathiah
Hodgson, 1835
Yellow-bellied Weasel area
Yellow-bellied weasel range

References

  1. ^ Duckworth, J.W.; Timmins, R.J.; Roberton, S.; Choudhury, A. & Lau, M.W.N. (2008). "Mustela kathiah". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2008. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 21 March 2009. Database entry includes a brief justification of why this species is of least concern
  2. ^ "Yellow-bellied weasel pictures and facts". thewebsiteofeverything.com. TheWebsiteOfEverything.com. Retrieved 11 May 2015.
  3. ^ Ved, Nimesh; Lalramnuna, S. (October 2008). Small Carnivore Conservation Vol 39. Mizoram, India: Samrakshan Trust House. p. 35.
  4. ^ "Weasel". a-z-animals.com. a-z-animals.com. Retrieved 11 May 2015.
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The Asiatic linsang (Prionodon) is a genus comprising two species native to Southeast Asia: the banded linsang (Prionodon linsang) and the spotted linsang (Prionodon pardicolor). Prionodon is considered a sister taxon of the Felidae.

Ferret-badger

Ferret-badgers are the five species of the genus Melogale, which is the only genus of the monotypic mustelid subfamily Helictidinae.

Bornean ferret-badger (Melogale everetti)

Chinese ferret-badger (Melogale moschata)

Javan ferret-badger (Melogale orientalis)

Burmese ferret-badger (Melogale personata)

Vietnam ferret-badger (Melogale cucphuongensis)

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Lutrogale

Lutrogale is a genus of otters, with only one extant species—the smooth-coated otter.

Mephitis (genus)

The genus Mephitis is one of several genera of skunks, which has two species and a North American distribution.

Mustelidae

The Mustelidae (; from Latin mustela, weasel) are a family of carnivorous mammals, including weasels, badgers, otters, ferrets, martens, mink, and wolverines, among others. Mustelids are diverse and the largest family in the order Carnivora, suborder Caniformia. Mustelidae comprises about 56-60 species across eight subfamilies.

Mustelinae

Mustelinae is a subfamily of family Mustelidae, which includes weasels, ferrets amd minks.It was formerly defined in a paraphyletic manner to also include wolverines, martens, and many other mustelids, to the exclusion of the otters (Lutrinae).

Nyctereutes

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Paradoxurinae

The Paradoxurinae are a subfamily of the viverrids that was denominated and first described by John Edward Gray in 1864.Pocock subordinated the oriental genera Paradoxurus, Paguma and Arctictis to this subfamily.

Paradoxurus

Paradoxurus is a genus within the viverrid family that was denominated and first described by Frédéric Cuvier in 1822. As of 2005, this genus was defined as comprising three species native to Southeast Asia:

the Asian palm civet (P. hermaphroditus)

the golden palm civet (P. zeylonensis)

the brown palm civet (P. jerdoni)In 2009, it was proposed to also include the golden wet-zone palm civet (P. aureus), the Sri Lankan brown palm civet (P. montanus) and the golden dry-zone palm civet (P. stenocephalus), which are endemic to Sri Lanka.

Pusa

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Only the Caspian seal is endangered.

Ruddy mongoose

The ruddy mongoose (Herpestes smithii) is a species of mongoose found in hill forests of peninsular India and Sri Lanka. This mongoose, along with the striped-neck and Indian grey mongeese, are the only mongoose species endemic to India and Sri Lanka. The ruddy mongoose is very closely related to Indian grey mongoose, but distinguished by its slightly larger size and black-tipped tail extending for 2 to 3 inches at the distal end. There are two sub-species of this mongoose, H. smithii smithii in India, and H. smithii zeylanicus (Thomas, 1852) in Sri Lanka.

Speothos

Speothos is a genus of canid found in Central and South America. The genus includes the living bush dog, Speothos venaticus, and an extinct Pleistocene species, Speothos pacivorus. Unusually, the fossil species was identified and named before the extant species was discovered, with the result that the type species of Speothos is S. pacivorus.

Tonkin weasel

The Tonkin weasel (Mustela tonkinensis) is a species of weasel described by Björkegren in 1941. It is known only from a singular specimen collected from an undisclosed location in Northern Vietnam. Originally believed to be a form of either the least weasel or the yellow-bellied weasel, the species was distinguished as a separate variety on the basis of skull differences by Groves in 2007.

Weasel

A weasel is a mammal of the genus Mustela of the family Mustelidae. The genus Mustela includes the least weasels, polecats, stoats, ferrets and minks. Members of this genus are small, active predators, with long and slender bodies and short legs. The family Mustelidae (which also includes badgers, otters, and wolverines) is often referred to as the "weasel family". In the UK, the term "weasel" usually refers to the smallest species, the least weasel (M. nivalis).Weasels vary in length from 173 to 217 mm (6.8 to 8.5 in), females being smaller than the males, and usually have red or brown upper coats and white bellies; some populations of some species moult to a wholly white coat in winter. They have long, slender bodies, which enable them to follow their prey into burrows. Their tails may be from 34 to 52 mm (1.3 to 2.0 in) long.Weasels feed on small mammals and have from time to time been considered vermin because some species took poultry from farms or rabbits from commercial warrens. They do, on the other hand, eat large numbers of rodents. They can be found all across the world except for Antarctica, Australia, and neighbouring islands.

West African oyan

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It is one of the least known small carnivores in Africa.

Extant Carnivora species

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