Yards from scrimmage

Yards from scrimmage is an American football and Canadian football statistical measure. In the game of football, progress is measured by advancing the football towards the opposing team's goal line. Progress can be made during play by the offensive team by advancing the ball from the point of progress at the start of play known as the line of scrimmage. When the offensive team advances the ball by rushing the football, the player who carries the ball is given credit for the difference in progress measured in rushing yards. When the offensive team advances the ball by pass reception, the player who catches the reception is given credit for the difference in progress measured in reception yards. Although the ball may also be advanced by penalty these yards are not considered yards from scrimmage. Progress lost via quarterback sacks are classified variously by league of play with rules having changed over time within some leagues. The total of rushing yards and receiving yards is known as yards from scrimmage.[1] This definition of yardage differs from total offense which gives credit for passing yardage to the person throwing the football rather than receiving the football.

This is an important statistic for running backs that contribute significantly to the passing attack. Many teams have special lineups for passing plays in which running backs who are better receivers are substituted into the game. Some running backs are notable for the fact that they are both a primary rushing and primary passing weapon. Notable running backs known for yards from scrimmage include Roger Craig, the first National Football League (NFL) player to have 1,000 yards rushing and receiving in the same season, Walter Payton, the NFL career record holder among running backs (until broken by Emmitt Smith), and Chris Johnson, the NFL single-season record holder.[2] Thurman Thomas once led the NFL in yards from scrimmage four consecutive years.[3]

Yards from scrimmage differs from all-purpose yards, which include all forms of return yards such as yards on kickoff returns, punt returns, interception returns, and fumble recovery returns, in addition to yards from scrimmage.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "NFL Yards from Scrimmage Stats: 2007". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved January 1, 2008.
  2. ^ "Titans' RB Chris Johnson sets NFL record for yards from scrimmage in a season". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on January 7, 2010. Retrieved January 4, 2009.
  3. ^ "THURMAN THOMAS". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved January 3, 2008.
1947 Florida State Seminoles football team

The 1947 Florida State Seminoles football team was an American football team that represented Florida State University as an independent during the 1947 college football season. In its first and only season under head coach Ed Williamson, the team compiled a 0–5 record and was outscored by a total of 90 to 18. The team played its home games at Centennial Field in Tallahassee, Florida.

In September 1947, the Florida State College for Women became coeducational, was renamed Florida State University and announced that it would field a football team, though it had no plans to compete with the University of Florida "for some time to come." The 1947 team was Florida State's first football team since 1904, after which Florida State became a women's college. Ed Williamson served as both athletic director and football coach and vowed to develop "a 'well rounded athletic program' without particular emphasis on football or any other single sport."In five games during the 1947 season, the team gained only 687 yards from scrimmage. The team completed 32 of 87 passes for 400 yards and 14 interceptions. "Red" Parrish was the team's leading rusher with 111 yards. Fullback Kenneth McLean led the team with 105 yards of total offense (105 rushing yards, 45 passing yards).

Dexter Bussey

Dexter Manley Bussey (born March 11, 1952) is a former American football running back. He played professional football in the National Football League (NFL) for the Detroit Lions for 11 years from 1974 to 1984 and became the Lions' all-time career rushing leader in 1981.

Bussey was born in Dallas, Texas, in 1952. He began his college career at the University of Oklahoma, but he transferred to the University of Texas–Arlington. He played for the Texas–Arlington Mavericks football team from 1971 to 1973 and totaled over 1,000 yards from scrimmage in both 1972 and 1973.Bussey was selected by the Detroit Lions in the third round, 65th overall pick, of the 1974 NFL Draft. He played for the Lions from 1974 to 1984. While with the Lions, he gained more than 1,000 yards from scrimmage in 1976, 1978, and 1980. In his 10-year career in the NFL, Bussey totaled 5,105 rushing yards and 6,721 yards from scrimmage. He was the Lions' starting halfback from 1975 to 1979 and the team's leading rusher in 1975, 1976, 1978, and 1979. He moved to fullback in 1980 after the Lions drafted Billy Sims. Bussey broke Altie Taylor's Lions' career rushing record in 1981, but his record was surpassed by Sims in 1984 and he became a backup after the Lions drafted James Jones in 1983. Bussey announced his retirement from the NFL in April 1985 at age 33.After retiring as a player, Bussey worked for at least 20 years as a uniform inspector for the NFL. He also operated a medical staffing agency.

Ed Buchanan

Ed Buchanan (July 16, 1934 – August 31, 1991) was a Canadian football running back who played nine seasons in the Canadian Football League for three teams. He was a CFL All-Star in 1964 while setting a record with 2,071 yards from scrimmage. Though injured for most of that year, he was part of the Saskatchewan Roughriders 1966 Grey Cup winning team.

Electric Company (football)

The Electric Company were the offensive line of the Buffalo Bills during the mid-1970s that helped running back O. J. Simpson establish numerous National Football League (NFL) all-time records and earn numerous statistical titles. The nickname is sometimes more loosely used to refer to the Electric Company Offense for the Bills offensive unit or the Electric Company Buffalo Bills for the teams of this era.

During these years, Simpson established NFL records for single-season rushing yards (1973), single-season yards from scrimmage (1973), single-season rushing yards per game (1973), single-season touchdowns (1975), single-season 200-yard games (1973), consecutive 100-yard games (1972–73), single-game rushing yards (1973 & 1976) and career 200-rushing yard games. His single-season rushing yards per game and career 200-yard rushing games records still stand. Simpson was selected to the Pro Bowl team and as an All-Pro performer each year between 1972 and 1976. He won the rushing title in four of those five seasons. During this time period, Simpson became the only running back to twice have 200-yard rushing efforts in back-to-back games. Simpson was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame for his exploits.

Although the Buffalo Bills had winning records during the 1973, 1974, and 1975 seasons, only the 1974 team made the NFL playoffs during the eight-team format era. However, they were eliminated by the eventual Super Bowl IX champion Pittsburgh Steelers.

Eric Studesville

Eric Studesville (born May 29, 1967) is an American football running backs coach and run game coordinator for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL). Studesville is known as the former run game coordinator for the Buffalo Bills and interim head coach of the Denver Broncos, a position he held 4 weeks in December 2010. He replaced Josh McDaniels after 12 games in the 2010 NFL Season, after which he resumed his primary role as running backs coach. He was the first African American head coach in Broncos history, albeit on an interim basis.

Horace King (American football)

Horace Edward King (born March 5, 1953) is a former American football running back. He played college football at the University of Georgia from 1972 to 1974 and professional football in the National Football League for the Detroit Lions from 1975 to 1983.

A native of Athens, Georgia, he played high school football at Clarke Central High School in that city. He next played at the University of Georgia from 1972 to 1974, totaling 1,673 yards from scrimmage. On October 12, 1974, he gained 134 yards and tied a Georgia record with four touchdowns against Ole Miss.King was selected by the Detroit Lions in the sixth round of the 1975 NFL Draft and played nine years for the Lions from 1975 to 1983. He was the Lions' leading rusher in 1977 when he totaled 521 rushing yards. His best season was 1978 when he started 15 games at fullback and totaled 1,056 yards from scrimmage (660 rushing and 396 receiving) and scored six touchdowns. In his nine-year NFL career, King totaled 2,081 rushing yards and 3,660 yards from scrimmage. He was cut by the Lions in late August 1984.

Larry Garron

Larry Garron is an American former collegiate and Professional Football player. A fullback, he played college football at Western Illinois University, and played professionally in the American Football League for the Boston Patriots from 1960 through 1968. He holds the team record run of 85 yards from scrimmage, set in a game against the Buffalo Bills on October 22, 1961. He averaged 5.9 yards per carry in 1962 and accounted for 1,168 total yards from scrimmage in 1963. Garron was an American Football League All-Star in 1961, 1963, 1964 and 1967, and a member of the Patriots' All-1960s (AFL) Team.

For one season, along with Bob Fourace, he served as a color commentator for New England Patriots preseason games.

At the same time Larry Garron was on the Patriots he studied various forms of martial arts. He holds rank in Kenpō (fist law), Hakkō-ryū Jujutsu, Gōjū-ryū (hard soft system), Shintō Musō-ryū, Yoshitsune Jujitsu, and Taekwondo.

Larry had some talented sporting sons and nephews, including nephew Donald Garron, who won the 1981 Massachusetts All State 220 yard championship in 22.37, as well as Rufus Harris, who had a tryout with the Boston Celtics in 1980. Two of his sons, Arnold and Andre, are in the Hall Of Fame for American football at the University of New Hampshire.

List of Kansas City Chiefs records

This article details statistics relating to the Kansas City Chiefs National Football League (NFL) American football team, including career, single season and games records.

List of National Football League records (individual)

Here is a list of the records in the National Football League set by individual players.

Marques Colston

Marques E. Colston ( MAR-kis KOHL-stən born June 5, 1983) is a former American football wide receiver. He played college football at Hofstra University, and was drafted by the New Orleans Saints in the seventh round of the 2006 NFL Draft. He helped the Saints achieve victory in Super Bowl XLIV with seven receptions for 83 yards against the Indianapolis Colts. He is the Saints' all-time franchise leader in receiving yards, yards from scrimmage, receiving touchdowns, total touchdowns, and total receptions.

Marshall Faulk

Marshall William Faulk (born February 26, 1973) is a former American football player who was a running back in the National Football League (NFL) for twelve seasons. He played college football for San Diego State University, and was a two-time consensus All-American. He was selected by the Indianapolis Colts as the second overall pick in the 1994 NFL Draft, and he also played professionally for the NFL's St. Louis Rams. Faulk is one of only three NFL players (Marcus Allen and Tiki Barber being the others) to reach at least 10,000 rushing yards and 5,000 receiving yards; he is the only one to amass 12,000 yards rushing and 6,000 yards receiving. Faulk was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2011 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 2017. He was a former analyst for various programs on the NFL Network until December 2017.

Matt Forte

Matthew Garrett Forte (born December 10, 1985) is a former American football running back who played ten seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Tulane and was drafted by the Chicago Bears in the second round of the 2008 NFL Draft. Forte established himself as a dual-threat running back who is capable of earning yards as a rusher and receiver. He spent eight years with the Bears before playing for the New York Jets for two seasons.

Mel Farr

Melvin Farr (November 3, 1944 – August 3, 2015) was an American football player and businessman.

A native of Beaumont, Texas, Farr played college football as a halfback on the 1965 and 1966 UCLA Bruins football teams that were ranked No. 4 and No. 5 respectively in the final AP Polls. He was selected as a consensus first-team All-American in 1966, gained over 1,000 yards from scrimmage in both 1965 and 1966, and was inducted into the UCLA Athletics Hall of Fame in 1988.

Farr was drafted by the Detroit Lions in the first round, seventh overall pick, of the 1967 NFL Draft and played seven years as a running back for the Lions. He led the Lions in both rushing and receiving in 1967, totaling 1,177 yards from scrimmage as a rookie, and was selected as the NFL Rookie of the Year. He was twice selected to play in the Pro Bowl, in 1967 and 1970. In a career shortened by injury, Farr gained a total of 4,446 yards from scrimmage and scored 36 touchdowns during his seven years in the NFL.After retiring from football, Farr acquired a Ford Motor Company dealership in 1975, eventually expanding his business to 11 dealerships in five states. By 1998, Farr's automotive group was cited as the largest African-American owned company in the country. His business failed in 2002 following adverse publicity and lawsuits relating to sales and finance practices.

Mike Pruitt

Michael L. "Mike" Pruitt (born April 3, 1954) is a former American football player.

Pruitt played professional football in the National Football League (NFL), principally at the fullback position, for 11 seasons from 1976 to 1986. He was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the first round (seventh overall pick) of the 1976 NFL Draft and spent nine seasons with that club. He had five seasons with over 1,000 rushing yards and was selected to play in the Pro Bowl in 1979 and 1980. He also played for the Buffalo Bills for four games in 1985 and for the Kansas City Chiefs in 1985 and 1986. In his NFL career, Pruitt appeared in a total of 152 games, gained 7,378 rushing yards and scored 56 touchdowns.

A native of Chicago, Pruitt also played college football at the fullback position for Purdue University from 1973 to 1975 and was selected as a second-team running back on the 1975 All-Big Ten Conference football team.

Phillip Lindsay

Phillip Lindsay (born July 24, 1994) is an American football running back for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). Lindsay was born in Denver, Colorado, grew up in Aurora, Colorado, and attended South High School in Denver where he became the school's all-time leading rusher with 4,587 yards. He played college football at the University of Colorado Boulder and set the school record in all-purpose yards (5,760) and yards from scrimmage (4,683). He was signed as an undrafted free agent by the Denver Broncos in 2018. Lindsay became the first undrafted offensive rookie to ever make the Pro Bowl.

Return yards

Return yards is an American football and Canadian football statistical measure that takes several forms. In American and Canadian football, progress is measured by advancing the football towards the opposing team's goal line. Progress can be made during play by the offensive team by advancing the ball from its point of progress at the start of play known as the line of scrimmage or by the defensive team after taking possession of the football via a change of possession (such as punt, kickoff, interception, punt block, blocked kick or fumble). When the defensive team advances the ball during play after a change in possession, yardage is credited from the point of the change of possession. Return specialists are commonly monitored statistically for their totals and averages. However, other types of return yardage such as interception return yards are also measured because the point on the field where a change in possession occurs is marked.

Kick return yards and punt return yards result from voluntary change in possession and most of the others result from involuntary forms of change in possession known as turnovers. Often kick return and punt return statistics are aggregated. and sometimes they are added to yards from scrimmage to yield all-purpose yards. When kick return yards and punt return yards are aggregated they are known as combined return yards or more formally, combined kick return yards.

Robert Mimbs

Robert Mimbs (born August 6, 1964 in Kansas City, Missouri) was a star Canadian Football League running back who played six seasons for three teams. He was named CFL All-Star three times and he won the Jeff Russel Memorial Trophy in 1991 and the Eddie James Memorial Trophy and Jeff Nicklin Memorial Trophy in 1996.

Total offense

Total offense (or total offence) is an American football and Canadian football statistic representing the total number of yards rushing and yards passing by a team or player. Total offense differs from yards from scrimmage, which gives credit for passing yardage to the person receiving the football rather than the person throwing the football.

In the game of football, progress is measured by advancing the football towards the opposing team's goal line. The team on offense can make progress during the play by advancing the ball from the line of scrimmage.

When the offensive team advances the ball by rushing the football, the player who carries the ball is given credit for the net gain, measured in rushing yards. When the offensive team advances the ball by pass reception, the player who throws the ball earns passing yards and the player who receives the ball earns receiving yards. The total of rushing yards and passing yards (but not receiving yards) is known as total offense. Although the ball may also be advanced by penalty, these yards do not contribute to total offense. Progress lost via quarterback sacks are classified differently, depending upon the league and/or level of football.

When defenses are measured on total offense allowed, it is called total defense.

Some definitions of individual total offense give credit to both the passer and receiver for passing yards. Thus, if a quarterback catches a pass in a trick play, or a non-quarterback throws a pass, some statistical issues arise.Steve McNair holds the NCAA career and single-season total offense/game records. Case Keenum, B.J. Symons, and David Klingler hold the total offense career, single-season and single game records.

William Andrews (American football)

William Andrews (born December 25, 1955) is a former NFL football running back. He played collegiately at Auburn University along with future NFL backs James Brooks and Joe Cribbs.

Andrews was selected by the Atlanta Falcons in the third round of the 1979 NFL Draft. While he was primarily used as a blocking back in college, Andrews excelled as a blocker, runner and pass catcher during his pro career. He would make an immediate impact, finishing with 167 yards rushing in his NFL debut as the Falcons defeated the New Orleans Saints, 40-34. Playing in 15 games, Andrews finished his rookie season with 1,023 yards rushing and was named to the all-rookie team. In 1980, Andrews helped lead the Falcons to a 12-4 record and a first-place finish in the NFC West division. He finished the season with 1,308 yards rushing, averaged 4.9 yards per attempt and also caught 51 passes for 456 yards. The season was the first of four straight in which Andrews was selected to play in the Pro Bowl.

While the Falcons record slipped in 1981, Andrews would have another great season. He led the NFL in yards from scrimmage with 2,036, again went over 1,300 yards rushing and scored a career-high 12 touchdowns (10 rushing, 2 receiving). Andrews became one of the first running backs in the NFL, along with Tony Dorsett, John Brockington, Ottis Anderson and Earl Campbell, to gain at least 1,000 yards in each of his first three seasons. Andrews was also fourth in receptions that season with 81. Andrews finished the strike-shortened 1982 season second in the NFL in yards from scrimmage with 1,076 and helped the Falcons return to the postseason.

In 1983, Andrews had his best season yet statistically. He was second in the NFL in rushing with 1,567 yards, second in rushing yards per game with an average of 97.9 and caught for 59 passes for 609 yards. His also finished second in yards from scrimmage with a total of 2,176. At season's end, he was named All-Pro by both the NEA and The Sporting News.

In the prime of his career, Andrews sustained a serious knee injury during the 1984 preseason that sidelined him for two years. He returned in 1986 for one season, largely as a tight end. He rushed for 214 yards on 52 attempts and scored 1 touchdown before retiring from the NFL with a career total of 5,986 yards rushing. At the time of his retirement, Andrews ranked 24th in NFL history in rushing yards.In his prime, Andrews was regarded as arguably the most bruising, powerful running back in the NFL. Ronnie Lott would later state that a head-on-collision he had with Andrews during a game between the San Francisco 49ers and the Falcons on December 19, 1982 was the hardest hit that he had received during his NFL career. In addition to leading the NFL in yards from scrimmage in 1981, Andrews also finished in the top four in that category three other times. He was named as the Falcons Player of the Year in both 1981 and 1983. To celebrate his career, his number 31 was retired in 2004 by the Falcons. Andrews was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 1996.

On Friday, March 30, 2012, Andrews was jailed in Cobb County, Georgia, on a civil contempt charge, stemming from on-going child support issues.

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