Yankees Universe

Yankees Universe is a charity that supports the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan. Created by Mindy Franklin Levine, the wife of New York Yankees President Randy Levine, the program raises money for the New York Yankees Universe fund. Proceeds for the fund are generated by donations, special events, and the sale of Yankees Universe T-shirts, and this money is made available to the cancer center. According to the MSKCC web site, the proceeds "go directly to support pediatric cancer research and care, helping to contribute to advancements in the treatment of children with cancer."

The shirts have become extremely popular with Yankee fans around the world and have raised significant funds for Sloan-Kettering.

Since the inception in April 2006 the phrase has gained popularity and now frequently appears in the press – including the New York Post, May 2007: "Roger Clemens pitches well nobody will criticize him for coming and going in the Yankees' Universe". However, the phrase has been found in the popular press at least as early as 2001.[1] As a result, some fans now consider "Yankees Universe" the unofficial name of the Yankee fanbase, as the team has a nationwide following and often attracts large crowds of its own fans at other Major League ballparks, especially Baltimore, Kansas City and Seattle.

See also

References

  1. ^ Berkow, Ira (June 16, 2000). "Yankees' Universe Has Two El Duques". New York Times.

External links

Cardinal Nation

Cardinal Nation, or Redbird Nation, is a term commonly used to describe, in aggregate, the fans of the St. Louis Cardinals baseball franchise. Cardinal Nation encompasses not just the area around St. Louis, but also a large portion of the Midwest and South. The team is traditionally popular in these regions and Cardinals games are broadcast on radio and television affiliates in ten states: Oklahoma, southern and central Illinois, southwest Indiana, Iowa, western Kentucky, Missouri, Arkansas, west Tennessee and parts of northern Mississippi and Alabama. The term "Cardinal Nation" has been in use since the 1930s, when the team's success and St. Louis radio greatly increased the Cardinals' popularity over a large area of the United States. "Cardinal Nation" remains a major term in team promotion.

In addition, the team is also popular in other major league markets, most notably in Colorado, where the Cardinals were the team of choice until the creation of the Rockies franchise in 1993. To this day, the Cardinals have many fans in attendance at games on the road in Denver, as well as every other major league venue.

Harmonica Incident

The Harmonica Incident took place on a New York Yankees team bus on August 20, 1964, en route to O'Hare International Airport. Infielder Phil Linz, slightly resentful at not being played during a four-game sweep by the Chicago White Sox that was believed at the time to have seriously set back the Yankees' chances at that year's American League pennant, began playing a harmonica in the back of the bus. Manager Yogi Berra, feeling that Linz's behavior was inappropriate given the team's recent poor performance, angrily called on him to stop, whereupon Linz threw the harmonica and loudly complained about being singled out despite not having been at fault for the losses.Journalists on the bus following the team reported the incident in the next day's newspapers, and it became national news. Although Linz was fined for the incident, he received an endorsement contract from harmonica manufacturer Hohner after the company saw an increase in sales. The contract more than made up for Linz's lost money from the fine. Radio stations in Boston urged fans of the Red Sox, whom the Yankees played immediately afterward, to greet Linz at the plate in Fenway Park with a harmonica and kazoo serenade. At an exhibition game against the crosstown New York Mets, Mets players tossed harmonicas onto the field.

The incident had divergent effects on the team. For the players, it ended well: Berra's authority as their manager was decisively established and they went 30–11 through the end of the season, clinching the pennant that had seemed out of reach. For the team's management, which had been dogged all season by reports that Berra could not control his former teammates, it confirmed that impression, and efforts to find a replacement for Berra (that had reportedly already been underway) succeeded shortly afterwards, with Johnny Keane, who was considered likely to be fired from his position as St. Louis Cardinals' manager after the season concluded, secretly agreeing to become the Yankees' manager. His team also came back from deep in the standings to win the National League pennant, and then defeat the Yankees in that year's World Series. The day afterwards, Berra was fired and Keane shocked his superiors by resigning instead of accepting a contract extension. Keane took over for Berra a few days later.

Despite its role in catalyzing the team that season, the incident has been seen as the beginning of the end of the Yankees' 15-year postwar dynasty, since it also coincided with the announcement that the CBS television network was buying the team. Keane was never able to fully earn the respect of either the aging, injury-plagued stars or the few promising younger players, and in the 1965 season the team failed to win the pennant after recording its first losing season in 40 years. When the subsequent season started with even worse results, Keane was fired, though that did not prevent the Yankees from finishing in last place. They would not return to the World Series until 1976, after CBS had sold the team to George Steinbrenner.

Old-Timers' Day

Old-Timers' Day (or Old-Timers' Game) generally refers to a tradition in Major League Baseball whereby a team, most prominently the New York Yankees, devotes the early afternoon preceding a weekend game to celebrate the baseball-related accomplishments of its former players who have since retired. The pattern has been copied intermittently by other sports but has failed to catch on.

Raider Nation

The Raider Nation is the official name for fans of the National Football League (NFL)'s Oakland Raiders. Fan Jim Hudson coined the term in the 1990s when the Raiders returned to Oakland after a long hiatus in Los Angeles, thus becoming a team with a regional fanbase. The Raider Nation website was created by Jim Hudson as a rallying point for the return to Oakland to revive the memory of the "original" Oakland Raiders. From the website sprang the original designs and logos that came to represent Raider Nation. Several key partnerships made sure that Raider Nation became the preeminent representative of Oakland Raider fans – Raider Nation managed the Raider Locker Room website owned by John Vella and Raider Nation became aligned with Silver and Black Illustrated which published a traditional printed newspaper. The Raider Nation name and logos were trademarked and a search of the USPTO verifies the origins of the name, as does a search of the origins of the RaiderNation.com website. The most conclusive evidence of the origin, however, is in the agreement between the NFL and Jim Hudson that allowed the NFL to secure the rights to the Raider Nation name and all associated logos.

The team's fans devotion is chronicled in Better to Reign in Hell, a book written by San Diego English professor Jim Miller and Kelly Mayhew, who are Raiders fans.

Steeler Nation

Steeler Nation is an unofficial name for the fan-base of the National Football League's Pittsburgh Steelers. The term was coined by NFL Films narrator John Facenda in the team's 1978 highlights film. Steelers Country is often used for the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, area where the fan base originates or for areas with a large Steelers fan base.

Tampa Bay Rays

The Tampa Bay Rays are an American professional baseball team based in St. Petersburg, Florida. The Rays compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member of the American League (AL) East division. Since its inception, the team's home venue has been Tropicana Field.

Following nearly three decades of unsuccessfully trying to gain an expansion franchise or enticing existing teams to relocate to the Tampa Bay Area, an ownership group led by Vince Naimoli was approved on March 9, 1995. The Tampa Bay Devil Rays began play in the 1998 Major League Baseball season.

Their first decade of play, however, was marked by futility; they finished in last place in the AL East in all but the 2004 season, when they finished second-to-last. Following the 2007 season, Stuart Sternberg, who had purchased controlling interest in the team from Vince Naimoli two years earlier, changed the team's name from "Devil Rays" to "Rays", now meant to primarily refer to a burst of sunshine rather than a manta ray, though a manta ray logo remains on the uniform sleeves. The 2008 season saw the Tampa Bay Rays post their first winning season, their first AL East championship, and their first pennant (defeating the rival Boston Red Sox in the ALCS), though they lost to the Philadelphia Phillies in that year's World Series. Since then, the Rays have played in the postseason in 2010, 2011, and 2013.

The Tampa Bay Rays' chief rivals are the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees. Regarding the former, there have been several notable on-field incidents. The Rays also have an intrastate interleague rivalry with the National League (NL)'s Miami Marlins (originally the Florida Marlins), whom they play in the Citrus Series.

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