Yale University Press

Yale University Press is a university press associated with Yale University. It was founded in 1908 by George Parmly Day,[3] and became an official department of Yale University in 1961, but it remains financially and operationally autonomous.

As of 2009, Yale University Press published approximately 300 new hardcover and 150 new paperback books annually and has more than 6,000 books in print. Its books have won five National Book Awards, two National Book Critics Circle Awards and eight Pulitzer Prizes.[4]

The press maintains offices in New Haven, Connecticut and London, England. It was a co-founder of the distributer TriLiteral LLC with MIT Press and Harvard University Press.[5] TriLiteral was sold to LSC Communications in 2018.[6]

Yale University Press
Yale press logo
Parent companyYale University
Founded1908
FounderGeorge Parmly Day
Country of originUSA
Headquarters locationNew Haven, Connecticut
DistributionTriLiteral (United States)
John Wiley & Sons (international)[1][2]
Nonfiction topicsVarious
Fiction genresPoetry, Literature in translation
Official websiteyalebooks.yale.edu
Portrait of George Parmly Day
George Parmly Day, founder of the Yale University Press

Series and publishing programs

Yale University Press (logo)
The Yale University Press' original logo, designed by Paul Rand.

Yale Series of Younger Poets

Since its inception in 1919, the Yale Series of Younger Poets Competition has published the first collection of poetry by new poets. The first winner was Howard Buck; the 2011 winner was Katherine Larson.

Yale Drama Series

Yale University Press and Yale Repertory Theatre jointly sponsor the Yale Drama Series, a playwriting competition. The winner of the annual competition is awarded the David C. Horn Prize of $10,000, publication of his/her manuscript by Yale University Press, and a staged reading at Yale Rep. The Yale Drama Series and David C. Horn Prize are funded by the David Charles Horn Foundation.[7]

Anchor Yale Bible Series

In 2007, Yale University Press acquired the Anchor Bible Series, a collection of more than 115 volumes of biblical scholarship, from the Doubleday Publishing Group.[8] New and backlist titles are now published under the Anchor Yale Bible Series name.

Future of American Democracy Series

Yale University Press is publishing the Future of American Democracy Series,[9] which "aims to examine, sustain, and renew the historic vision of American democracy in a series of books by some of America's foremost thinkers", in partnership with the Future of American Democracy Foundation.[10]

The Lamar Series in Western History

The Lamar Series in Western History (formerly the Yale Western Americana series)[11] was established in 1962 to publish works that enhance the understanding of human affairs in the American West and contribute to a wider understanding of why the West matters in the political, social, and cultural life of America.[12]

Terry Lectures Series

The Dwight H. Terry Lectureship was established in 1905 to encourage the consideration of religion in the context of modern science, psychology, and philosophy. Many of the lectures, which are hosted by Yale University, have been edited into book form by the Yale University Press.

Yale Nota Bene

On September 22, 2000, Yale University Press announced a new Yale Nota Bene imprint that would "feature reprints of best-selling and classic Yale Press titles encompassing works of history, religion, science, current affairs, reference and biography, in addition to fiction, poetry and drama."[13]

Yale Publishing Course

The Yale Publishing Course was founded in 2010 by former Publishing Director of the Yale University Press, Tina C. Weiner. It filled the gap created by the closing of the legendary Stanford Publishing Course. It operates under the aegis of the Office of International Affairs of Yale University.

The Course trains mid to senior-level publishing professionals to tackle the most compelling issues facing the publishing industry and concentrates on building leadership skills. The curriculum focuses on in-depth analyses of global trends, innovative business models, management strategies, and new advances in technology. Its immersive week-long programs, one devoted to book publishing and the other to magazine and digital publishing, combine lectures, discussion groups, and one-on-one counseling sessions. The faculty is made up of leading industry experts and members of the Yale School of Management, the Yale Library, and the Yale University Press.

Participants come from all over the world and represent all areas of publishing within organizations of all sizes and types of publications.

Controversies

Mangling the Typesetting of Mises' "Human Action"

In 1963, the Press published a revised edition of Ludwig von Mises's "Human Action". In the May 5, 1964 issue of National Review, Henry Hazlitt wrote the story "Mangling a Masterpiece", accusing Yale University Press of intentionally typesetting the new edition in an amateurish fashion, due to the Press's differing ideological beliefs.[14][15]

Muhammad cartoon controversy

In August, 2009, officials at the Press ignited a controversy when they decided to expunge reproductions of the cartoons involved in the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy, along with all other images of Muhammad, from a scholarly book entitled The Cartoons that Shook the World, by professor Jytte Klausen.[16]

References

  1. ^ Contact Us
  2. ^ "Third Party Distribution | Wiley". Retrieved 2018-02-08.
  3. ^ Bradley, George (1998). "Introduction". The Yale Younger Poets Anthology. New Haven and London. p. 24.
  4. ^ "Donatich Appointed New Director of Yale University Press". Press release. Yale University. December 11, 2002. Retrieved 2011-01-25.
  5. ^ TriLiteral
  6. ^ "LSC Buys TriLiteral; Turner Purchases Gürze Books". PublishersWeekly.com. Retrieved 2018-07-08.
  7. ^ Yale Drama Series: Prize for Emerging Playwrights from the Yale University Press website
  8. ^ "Yale University Press Acquires Anchor Bible Series from Doubleday". Yale Books Unbound. Yale University Press. 2007-09-25. Retrieved 2017-01-24.
  9. ^ The Future of American Democracy Series from the Yale University Press official website
  10. ^ Official website of the Future of American Democracy Foundation
  11. ^ Basbanes, Nicholas A. A World of Letters: Yale University Press, 1908-2008, New Haven and London, 2008. p. 222, Centennial Highlights
  12. ^ The Lamar Series in Western History from the Yale University Press official website
  13. ^ "Yale Press launches new imprint with 'global bookstore appeal'". Yale Bulletin and Calendar. Yale University Press. 29 (3). September 22, 2000.
  14. ^ ""Mangling a Masterpiece" by Henry Hazlitt, National Review, Tuesday, May 5th, 1964". UNZ.org.
  15. ^ GaryNorth.com (2 May 2013). "Publishing Atrocity: The 1963 Edition of Human Action".
  16. ^ Patricia Cohen (August 13, 2009). "Yale Press Bans Images of Muhammad in New Book". The New York Times.

External links

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Wikisource has original works published by or about:
Albany Plan

The Albany Plan of Union was a plan to create a unified government for the Thirteen Colonies, suggested by Benjamin Franklin, then a senior leader (age 48) and a delegate from Pennsylvania, at the Albany Congress on July 10, 1754 in Albany, New York. More than twenty representatives of several Northern Atlantic colonies had gathered to plan their defense related to the French and Indian War, the front in North America of the Seven Years' War between Great Britain and France, spurred on by George Washington's recent defeat in the Ohio valley. The Plan represented one of multiple early attempts to form a union of the colonies "under one government as far as might be necessary for defense and other general important purposes."

Alfred Hugenberg

Alfred Ernst Christian Alexander Hugenberg (19 June 1865 – 12 March 1951) was an influential German businessman and politician. A leading figure in nationalist politics in Germany for the first few decades of the twentieth century, he became the country's leading media proprietor during the inter-war period. As leader of the German National People's Party he was instrumental in helping Adolf Hitler become Chancellor of Germany and served in his first cabinet in 1933, hoping to control Hitler and use him as his "tool." Those plans backfired, and by the end of 1933 Hugenberg had been pushed to the sidelines. Although Hugenberg continued to serve as a "guest" member of the Reichstag until 1945, he wielded no political influence.

Angevin Empire

The term "Angevin Empire" (; French: L'Empire Plantagenêt) is an unofficial umbrella term among historians referring to the possessions of the Angevin kings of England, who held lands in England and France, during the 12th and 13th centuries. Its rulers were Henry II (ruled 1154–1189), Richard I (r. 1189–1199), and John (r. 1199–1216). The Angevin Empire is an early example for composite states.The Angevins of the French House of Plantagenet ruled over an area covering half of France, all of England, and parts of Ireland and Wales, and had further influence over much of the remaining British Isles. The empire was established by Henry II, as King of England, Duke of Normandy, and Count of Anjou (from which the Angevins derive their name), as well as Duke of Aquitaine by right of his wife. Although their title of highest rank came from the Kingdom of England, the Angevins held court primarily at Angers and Chinon in France.

The influence and power of the House of Anjou brought them into conflict with the kings of France of the House of Capet, to whom they also owed feudal homage to their French possessions, bringing in a period of rivalry between both dynasties. Despite the extent of Angevin rule, Henry's son, John, was defeated in the Anglo-French War (1213–1214) by Philip II of France following the Battle of Bouvines. John lost control of most of his continental possessions, apart from Gascony in southern Aquitaine. This defeat set the scene for further conflicts between England and France, leading up to the Hundred Years' War.

Emanuel Raphael Belilios

Emanuel Raphael Belilios, CMG, JP (14 November 1837 – 11 November 1905) was a Hong Kong Jewish opium dealer and businessman.

Belilios was born in Calcutta, British India on 14 November 1837. His father was Raphael Emanuel Belilios, member of a Jewish Venetian family. Belilios married Simha Ezra in 1855, and in 1862 he settled in Hong Kong and engaged in trade. His fabulous success saw him described in the British press at the time as "one of the merchant princes of the colony."In the 1870s, Belilios was chairman of the Hongkong and Shanghai Hotels, Limited.He tried to establish relations with the then British prime minister Benjamin Disraeli by proposing a marble and bronze statue of Disraeli, which was declined by the prime minister himself. Belilios erected the Beaconsfield Arcade, a reference to Disraeli title Lord Beaconsfield, in Hong Kong instead. However until his death Bellios would annually send a wreath to decorate the statue of Benjamin Disraeli on Parliament Square.He became Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Chairman from 1876 to 1882, appointed to the Legislative Council of Hong Kong in 1881 and as the Council's Senior Unofficial Member from 1892 to 1900.

Belilios gained his reputation as a philanthropist. In the years 1887 and 1888, Belilios gave out two annual scholarships valued at $60, to the students of the Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese and studying at the Alice Memorial Hospital. In August 1889, Belilios donated $25,000 to set up a girls' government school. The Belilios Public School was renamed from Central School for Girls in honour of Belilios.His first son David Belilios perished in the plague of 1898.Regarding the Chinese population Belilios observed favourably that: “The native Chinese make no difference between a Jew and Christian. Both are foreigners in their eyes, but, if anything they are better affected towards the Jew who they regard as Asiatic like themselves.”Belilios died in London on 11 November 1905. On his death he bequeathed a £250,000 to found a free college for Jewish children in Calcutta.

Fluting (architecture)

Fluting in architecture consists of shallow grooves running along a surface.

The term typically refers to the grooves running vertically on a column shaft or a pilaster, but need not necessarily be restricted to those two applications. If the hollowing out of material meets in a point, the point is called an arris.

Guillaume-Chrétien de Lamoignon de Malesherbes

Guillaume-Chrétien de Lamoignon de Malesherbes (6 December 1721 – 23 April 1794), often referred to as Malesherbes or Lamoignon-Malesherbes, was a French statesman and minister in the ancien régime, and later counsel for the defense of Louis XVI. He is known for his vigorous criticism of royal abuses as President of the Cour des Aides and his role, as director of censorship, in the publication of the Encyclopédie. Despite his committed monarchism, his writings contributed to the development of liberalism during the French Age of Enlightenment.

Kuntsevo Dacha

The Kuntsevo Dacha was Joseph Stalin's personal residence near the former town of Kuntsevo (then Moscow Oblast, now part of Moscow's Fili district), where he lived for the last two decades of his life and died on 5 March 1953, although he also spent much time inside the Kremlin, where he possessed living quarters next to his offices. The dacha is located inside a forest not far from the modern-day Victory Park.The so-called "nearer dacha" (Ближняя дача) was built in 1933-34 to Miron Merzhanov's designs. One storey was added to the original building in 1943. It was in Kuntsevo where Stalin lived during World War II. It was there that he played host to such high-profile guests as Winston Churchill and Mao Zedong.

Mary Chesnut's Civil War

Mary Chesnut's Civil War is an annotated collection of the diaries of Mary Boykin Chesnut, an upper-class planter who lived in South Carolina during the American Civil War. The diaries were extensively annotated by historian C. Vann Woodward and published by Yale University Press in 1981. For his work on the book, Woodward was awarded the 1982 Pulitzer Prize for History.

Michael Walzer

Michael Laban Walzer (; born 1935) is a prominent American political theorist and public intellectual. A professor emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey, he is co-editor of Dissent, an intellectual magazine that he has been affiliated with since his years as an undergraduate at Brandeis University. He has written books and essays on a wide range of topics—many in political ethics—including just and unjust wars, nationalism, ethnicity, Zionism, economic justice, social criticism, radicalism, tolerance, and political obligation. He is also a contributing editor to The New Republic. To date, he has written 27 books and published over 300 articles, essays, and book reviews in Dissent, The New Republic, The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Harpers, and many philosophical and political science journals.

New Wave (design)

In design, New Wave or Swiss Punk Typography refers to an approach to typography that defies strict grid-based arrangement conventions. Characteristics include inconsistent letterspacing, varying typeweights within single words and type set at non-right angles.

The Cartoons that Shook the World

The Cartoons that Shook the World is a 2009 book by Brandeis University professor Jytte Klausen about the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy. Klausen contends that the controversy was deliberately stoked up by people with vested interests on all sides, and argues against the view that it was based on a cultural misunderstanding about the depiction of Muhammad. The book itself caused controversy before its publication when Yale University Press removed all images from the book, including the controversial cartoons themselves and some other images of Muhammad.

The Encyclopedia of New York City

The Encyclopedia of New York City is a comprehensive reference book on New York City, New York. Historian and Columbia University professor Kenneth T. Jackson edited this work that combines informative and interesting information about New York City into one volume, first published in 1995 by the New-York Historical Society and Yale University Press and now available in its second edition, published in 2010.

The YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe

The YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe is a two-volume, English-language reference work on the history and culture of Eastern Europe Jewry in this region, prepared by the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and published by Yale University Press in 2008.

The Yale Record

The Yale Record is the campus humor magazine of Yale University. Founded in 1872, it became the oldest humor magazine in the world when Punch folded in 2002.The Record is currently published eight times during the academic year and is distributed in Yale residential college dining halls and around the nation through subscriptions. Content from the magazine is made available online and entire issues can be downloaded in .pdf form.

Umberto II of Italy

Umberto II (Italian: Umberto Nicola Tommaso Giovanni Maria di Savoia; 15 September 1904 – 18 March 1983) was the last King of Italy. He reigned for 34 days, from 9 May 1946 to 12 June 1946, although he had been de facto head of state since 1944, and was nicknamed the May King (Italian: Re di Maggio).

Umberto was the only son among the five children of King Victor Emmanuel III and Queen Elena. In an effort to repair the monarchy's image after the fall of Benito Mussolini's regime, Victor Emmanuel transferred his powers to Umberto in 1944 while retaining the title of king. As a referendum was in preparation on the abolition of the monarchy in 1946, Victor Emmanuel abdicated his throne in favour of Umberto in the hope that his exit might bolster the monarchy. But the referendum passed, Italy was declared a republic, and Umberto lived out the rest of his life in exile in Cascais, on the Portuguese Riviera.

Under His Very Windows

Under His Very Windows: The Vatican and the Holocaust in Italy (2000, Yale University Press) is a book by Susan Zuccotti which examines the role of the Catholic Church in providing aid to Jews in Italy during the Holocaust, and is critical of the actions of the papacy in this regard.

Victor Emmanuel III of Italy

Victor Emmanuel III (Vittorio Emanuele Ferdinando Maria Gennaro di Savoia; Italian: Vittorio Emanuele III, Albanian: Viktor Emanueli III, Amharic: ቪክቶር ኢማንዌል, translit. vīkitori īmawēli; 11 November 1869 – 28 December 1947) was the King of Italy from 29 July 1900 until his abdication on 9 May 1946. In addition, he held the thrones of Ethiopia and Albania as Emperor of Ethiopia (1936–1941) and King of the Albanians (1939–1943). During his reign of nearly 46 years, which began after the assassination of his father Umberto I, the Kingdom of Italy became involved in two world wars. His reign also encompassed the birth, rise, and fall of Italian Fascism.

During World War I, Victor Emmanuel III accepted the resignation of Prime Minister Paolo Boselli and named Vittorio Emanuele Orlando (the premier of victory) in his place. Following the March on Rome, he appointed Benito Mussolini as Prime Minister and later deposed him in 1943 during World War II.

Victor Emmanuel abdicated his throne in 1946 in favour of his son Umberto II, hoping to strengthen support for the monarchy against an ultimately successful referendum to abolish it. He then went into exile to Alexandria, Egypt, where he died and was buried the following year. His remains were returned in 2017 to rest in Italy, following an agreement between Italian President Sergio Mattarella and Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi.

He was also called by the Italians Sciaboletta ("little saber") due to his height of 1.53 m (5 ft 0 in), or Il Re soldato (The Soldier King) for having led his country during both the world wars.

Yale College

Yale College is the undergraduate liberal arts college of Yale University. Founded in 1701, it is the original school of the university. Although other schools of the university were founded as early as 1810, all of Yale was officially known as Yale College until 1887, when its schools were confederated and the institution was renamed Yale University.

Originally established to train Congregationalist ministers, the college began teaching humanities and natural sciences by the late 18th century. At the same time, students began organizing extracurricular organizations, first literary societies, and later publications, sports teams, and singing groups. By the mid-19th century, it was the largest college in the United States. In 1847, it was joined by another undergraduate degree-granting school at Yale, the Sheffield Scientific School, which was absorbed into the college in the mid-20th century. These merged curricula became the basis of the modern-day liberal arts curriculum, which requires students to take courses in a broad range of subjects, including foreign language, composition, sciences, and quantitative reasoning, in addition to electing a departmental major in their sophomore year.

The most distinctive feature of undergraduate life is the school's system of residential colleges, established in 1932 and modeled after constituent schools of English universities. All undergraduates live in these colleges after their freshman year, when most live on the school's Old Campus.

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