Wyndol Gray

Wyndol Woodrow Gray (March 30, 1922 – March 20, 1994) was an American professional basketball player.

Gray played at Akron South High School in Akron, Ohio and went on to play collegiately at Bowling Green State University in 1942. At the time, freshmen were allowed to play to compensate for a shortage of college-age players due to World War II. Gray played on future Hall of Fame coach Harold Anderson's first team at Bowling Green. He led the team in scoring at 22.3 points per game and the Falcons went 18–4.[1]

Gray joined the Navy after the season, and returned to Bowling Green for the 1944–45 season as a part of the V-12 Navy College Training Program[2] and, along with big man Don Otten, led the Falcons to the final of the 1945 National Invitation Tournament, where they were defeated by the George Mikan-led DePaul Blue Demons. After the season, Gray was named a consensus first team All-American – Bowling Green's first in basketball.[1]

In 1945–46, Gray played at Harvard. There he led the Crimson to their first NCAA tournament appearance[3] and at the conclusion of the season he was named a second team All-American by the Sporting News magazine,[4] giving him the unusual distinction of being named an All-American at two different universities.

After his college career was over, Gray played for Honey Russell on the first Boston Celtics team in 1946–47. He played in 55 of the team's 60 games and finished third on the team in scoring at 6.4 points per game. The following season, the Celtics traded Gray to the St. Louis Bombers for guard Cecil Hankins. Eleven games into his Bombers career, Gray was again traded, this time to the Providence Steamrollers for forward Ariel Maughan. Gray's Steamrollers career lasted only one game.[5]

Gray, who is one of only four Harvard players to play in the NBA, died on March 20, 1994.

Wyndol Gray
Personal information
BornMarch 30, 1922
DiedMarch 20, 1994 (aged 71)
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Listed weight175 lb (79 kg)
Career information
High schoolAkron South (Akron, Ohio)
College
Playing career1946–1948
PositionGuard / Forward
Number4, 3
Career history
1946–1947Boston Celtics
1947St. Louis Bombers
1948Providence Steamrollers
1948Toledo Jeeps
Career highlights and awards
Career BAA statistics
Points363
ReboundsNot tracked
Assists50
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

BAA career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played  FG%  Field-goal percentage
 FT%  Free-throw percentage  APG  Assists per game
 PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season

Year Team GP FG% FT% APG PPG
1946–47 Boston 55 .292 .581 .9 6.4
1947–48 St. Louis 11 .167 .333 .3 1.2
1947–48 Providence 1 .000 .000 .0 .0
Career 67 .283 .570 .7 5.4

References

  1. ^ a b 2009-10 Bowling Green men's basketball media guide, accessed October 2, 2010
  2. ^ BGSU HOF profile, accessed October 2, 2010
  3. ^ Harvard’s Amaker Calls Upset Win a Defining Moment, accessed September 2, 2010
  4. ^ Harvard basketball All-Americans, accessed September 2, 2010.
  5. ^ Basketball-reference.com
1945 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1945 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Helms Athletic Foundation, Converse, The Sporting News, and Argosy Magazine.

1946 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1946 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Helms Athletic Foundation, Converse, The Sporting News, and True Magazine.

1946–47 Boston Celtics season

The 1946–47 Boston Celtics season was the first season of the Boston Celtics in the Basketball Association of America (BAA/NBA). Walter A. Brown was the man who was responsible for starting the franchise. On an early June day in 1946, Brown, who operated the Boston Garden arena and was part of the National Hockey League's Boston Bruins, was the driving force behind the Basketball Association of America and the Celtics birth. After considering several team names, including Whirlwinds, Unicorns and Olympics, Brown opted for Celtics. He hoped to grab the attention of Boston's large Irish American population. John Davis "Honey" Russell was hired as the first Celtics coach, and the team soon began its inaugural season, losing its first game 59–53 to the Providence Steamrollers. Although the Celtics would eventually become the signature franchise of the NBA, the club had a lacklustre first season as they started with 0 wins and 5 losses. The Celtics won their first game of the season against the Toronto Huskies.

1947–48 Boston Celtics season

The 1947–48 Boston Celtics season was the second season of the Boston Celtics in the Basketball Association of America (BAA/NBA).

1947–48 Providence Steamrollers season

The 1947–48 Providence Steamrollers season was the second season of the Providence Steamrollers.

Boston Celtics all-time roster

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared in at least one regular season or playoff game for the Boston Celtics NBA franchise.

Gray (surname)

Gray is a surname of that can come from a variety of origins but is typically found in Scotland, Ireland and England.

In Ireland, the surname may have a Gaelic source from a phonetic transcription, or Anglicization of McGrath or McGraw. "Mac Giolla Riabhaigh" is sometimes Gray, but is also Anglicized to "McGreevy," "Gallery" and others.

In most Scottish instances, the name "Gray" is from the Germanic Scots language, and is cognate with Old English, "græg", meaning "grey", probably as a hair colour.

Also among Irish and Scottish Grays is the English name of Anglo-Norman origin. A knight of Viking origin, Anchetil de Greye, accompanied William the Conqueror in his 1066 invasion of England. de Greye's descendants would become bishops John de Gray of Norwich and Walter de Gray of York.

List of 1946–47 BAA season transactions

This is a list of personnel changes from the 1946–47 BAA season.

List of 1947–48 BAA season transactions

This is a list of all personnel changes for the 1947 BAA off-season and 1947–48 BAA season.

List of National Basketball Association players (G)

This is a list of National Basketball Association players whose last names begin with G.

The list also includes players from the American National Basketball League (NBL), the Basketball Association of America (BAA), and the original American Basketball Association (ABA). All of these leagues contributed to the formation of the present-day NBA.

Individuals who played in the NBL prior to its 1949 merger with the BAA are listed in italics, as they are not traditionally listed in the NBA's official player registers.

List of Providence Steamrollers players

The following is a list of players of the now-defunct Providence Steamrollers professional basketball team.

List of St. Louis Bombers players

The following is a list of players of the now-defunct St. Louis Bombers professional basketball team.

V-12 Navy College Training Program

The V-12 Navy College Training Program was designed to supplement the force of commissioned officers in the United States Navy during World War II. Between July 1, 1943, and June 30, 1946, more than 125,000 participants were enrolled in 131 colleges and universities in the United States. Numerous participants attended classes and lectures at the respective colleges and earned completion degrees for their studies. Some even returned from their naval obligations to earn a degree from the colleges where they were previously stationed.

The V-12 program's goal was to produce officers, not unlike the Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP), which sought to turn out more than 200,000 technically trained personnel in such fields as engineering, foreign languages, and medicine. Running from 1942 to 1944, the ASTP recruits were expected but not required to become officers at the end of their training.

First Team
Second Team

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