World Series television ratings

The highest average rating for an entire World Series is tied between the 1978 Series featuring the New York Yankees and Los Angeles Dodgers and the 1980 Series featuring the Philadelphia Phillies and Kansas City Royals. Both Series, each of which went six games, averaged a national rating of 32.8 and a share of 56. However, the 1978 Series had a slightly larger total viewership (44,278,950) than 1980 (42,300,000).

The highest-rated individual game in Series history was Game 7 in 1986, as the New York Mets defeated the Boston Red Sox at Shea Stadium in New York City. The game had a 38.9 national rating and a 55 share. This broke the record established two nights before, in which 52% of televisions in use in the US were tuned in to see the Mets' famous Game 6 comeback that forced a Game 7.

The lowest-rated World Series game came in 2008, as only 9.836 million people watched Game 3 between the Philadelphia Phillies and the Tampa Bay Rays; a rain delay moved the start of the game to after 10 p.m. on the East Coast with the game not ending until 1:47 a.m. It had an all-time low rating of 6.1, matched later by Game 3 in 2012 between the San Francisco Giants and the Detroit Tigers.

The least-watched World Series was in 2012, a four-game sweep of the Detroit Tigers by the San Francisco Giants that averaged a 7.6 rating and 12 share.

Game 7 of the 2016 World Series between the Chicago Cubs and Cleveland Indians saw the highest rating in 25 years, averaging 40 million viewers and more than 75 million viewers saw at least part of the game.[1] A total of 115 million viewers watched the Series at some point.[2]

Shea Crowded
Shea Stadium, venue of the highest-rated individual game, Game 7 of the 1986 World Series.

Least and most viewed World Series, 1984 – present

The following shows the World Series with the lowest and highest average viewership. Figures are in millions.

  1. 2012 — 12.636 M
  2. 2008 — 13.193 M
  3. 2014 — 13.930 M
  4. 2018 — 14.125 M
  5. 2010 — 14.217 M
  1. 1986 — 36.370 M
  2. 1991 — 35.680 M
  3. 1987 — 35.340 M
  4. 1985 — 34.510 M
  5. 1988 — 34.490 M

Viewership records for Games 1–7, 1984 – present

The following table shows the viewership records — both highest and lowest — for games one through seven in a World Series. Figures are in millions.

Game Game 1 Game 2 Game 3 Game 4 Game 5 Game 6 Game 7
Highest 33.9M (1984) 34.9M (1993) 35.0M (1987) 35.0M (1985) 38.8M (1988) 44.5M (1986) 55–60M (1986)
Lowest 12.2M (2014) 12.3M (2012) 9.8M (2008) 10.7M (2014) 12.6M (2014) 13.4M (2014) 23.5M (2014)

Television ratings by year, 1984 – present

Figures are expressed as ratings/share. Ratings represent the percentage of U.S. households that watched the game on television. Share represents the percentage of television sets in use that were tuned to the game.

Year Net. Results Avg. Game 1 Game 2 Game 3 Game 4 Game 5 Game 6 Game 7
2018 Fox Boston Red Sox 4,
Los Angeles Dodgers 1
8.3/17
(14.125 M
viewers)[3]
8.2/16
(13.761 M
viewers)[4]
8.1/15
(13.458 M
viewers)[5]
7.9/18
(13.251 M
viewers)[6]
7.9/16
(13.563 M
viewers)[7]
10.0/18
(17.634 M
viewers)[8]
No Game
2017 Fox Houston Astros 4,
Los Angeles Dodgers 3
10.7/20
(18.926 M
viewers)[3]
8.7[9]/15
(14.968 M
viewers)[10]
9.2[11]/18
(15.483 M
viewers)[12]
8.8[13]/17
(15.676 M
viewers)[14]
8.7[15]/17
(15.400 M
viewers)[16]
10.5[17]/21
(18.940 M
viewers)[18]
12.6[19]/23
(22.229 M
viewers)[20]
15.8[21]/28
(28.240 M
viewers)[22]
2016 Fox Chicago Cubs 4,
Cleveland Indians 3
12.9/22
(22.847 M
viewers)[23]
11.3[24]/20
(19.368 M
viewers)[25]
10.2[26]/18
(17.395 M
viewers)[27]
11.0[28]/20
(19.384 M
viewers)[29]
9.3[30]/18
(16.705 M
viewers)[31]
13.1[32]/21
(23.638 M
viewers)[33]
13.3[34]/23
(23.396 M
viewers)[35]
21.8[36]/37
(40.045 M
viewers)[37]
2015 Fox Kansas City Royals 4,
New York Mets 1
8.6/16
(14.533 M
viewers)[23]
9.0/17
(14.944 M
viewers)
8.3/14
(13.722 M
viewers)
7.9/15
(13.205 M
viewers)
7.8/15
(13.587 M
viewers)
10.0/17
(17.206 M
viewers)
No Game
2014 Fox San Francisco Giants 4,
Kansas City Royals 3
8.2/14
(13.930 M
viewers)[23]
7.3/12
(12.191 M
viewers)
7.9/14
(12.917 M
viewers)
7.2/13
(12.133 M
viewers)
6.3/12
(10.742 M
viewers)
7.3/12
(12.635 M
viewers)
8.1/13
(13.372 M
viewers)
13.7/23
(23.517 M
viewers)
2013 Fox Boston Red Sox 4,
St. Louis Cardinals 2
8.9/15
(14.984 M
viewers)[23]
8.6/14
(14.400 M
viewers)
8.3/13
(13.429 M
viewers)
7.4/14
(12.473 M
viewers)
9.4/15
(15.975 M
viewers)
8.9/14
(14.446 M
viewers)
11.3/18
(19.178 M
viewers)
No Game
2012 Fox San Francisco Giants 4,
Detroit Tigers 0
7.6/12
(12.636 M
viewers)[23]
7.6/12
(12.240 M
viewers)
7.8/12
(12.340 M
viewers)
6.1/11
(10.471 M
viewers)
8.9/14
(15.485 M
viewers)
No Game
2011 Fox St. Louis Cardinals 4,
Texas Rangers 3
10.0/16
(16.521 M
viewers)[23]
8.7/14
(14.174 M
viewers)
8.9/14
(14.280 M
viewers)
6.6/12
(11.247 M
viewers)
9.2/14
(15.156 M
viewers)
8.8/14
(14.324 M
viewers)
12.7/21
(21.065 M
viewers)
14.7/25
(25.403 M
viewers)
2010 Fox San Francisco Giants 4,
Texas Rangers 1
8.4/14
(14.217 M
viewers)[23]
8.9/15
(15.009 M
viewers)
8.5/14
(14.130 M
viewers)
6.7/13
(11.460 M
viewers)
9.0/15
(15.537 M
viewers)
8.8/14
(14.950 M
viewers)
No Game
2009 Fox New York Yankees 4,
Philadelphia Phillies 2
11.7/19
(19.334 M
viewers)[23]
11.9/19
(19.511 M
viewers)
11.7/19
(18.897 M
viewers)
9.1/18
(15.397 M
viewers)
13.5/22
(22.761 M
viewers)
10.6/16
(17.092 M
viewers)
13.4/22
(22.339 M
viewers)
No Game
2008 Fox Philadelphia Phillies 4,
Tampa Bay Rays 1
8.4/14
(13.193 M
viewers)[23]
9.2/15
(14.634 M
viewers)
8.1/13
(12.777 M
viewers)
6.1/13
(9.836 M
viewers)
9.3/15
(15.479 M
viewers)
9.6/14
(15.787 M
viewers)
No Game
2007 Fox Boston Red Sox 4,
Colorado Rockies 0
10.6/18
(17.212 M
viewers)[23]
10.5/18
(16.897 M
viewers)
11.1/18
(16.950 M
viewers)
8.5/15
(14.055 M
viewers)
12.6/21
(20.946 M
viewers)
No Game
2006 Fox St. Louis Cardinals 4,
Detroit Tigers 1
10.1/17
(15.795 M
viewers)[23]
8.0/15
(12.840 M
viewers)
11.6/18
(18.165 M
viewers)
10.2/17
(15.582 M
viewers)
10.4/18
(16.113 M
viewers)
10.3/18
(16.277 M
viewers)
No Game
2005 Fox Chicago White Sox 4,
Houston Astros 0
11.1/19
(17.162 M
viewers)
9.5/17
(15.015 M
viewers)
11.1/17
(17.190 M
viewers)
11.0/21
(16.652 M
viewers)
13.0/21
(19.979 M
viewers)
No Game
2004 Fox Boston Red Sox 4,
St. Louis Cardinals 0
15.8/26
(25.390 M
viewers)
13.7/25
(23.168 M
viewers)
15.9/24
(25.463 M
viewers)
15.7/24
(24.422 M
viewers)
18.2/28
(28.844 M
viewers)
No Game
2003 Fox Florida Marlins 4,
New York Yankees 2
12.8/22
(20.143 M
viewers)
10.9/20
(17.687 M
viewers)
12.6/20
(20.552 M
viewers)
12.5/21
(18.894 M
viewers)
13.6/23
(20.885 M
viewers)
13.2/21
(19.919 M
viewers)
13.9/25
(23.240 M
viewers)
No Game
2002 Fox Anaheim Angels 4,
San Francisco Giants 3
11.9/20
(19.261 M
viewers)
9.4/18
(15.457 M
viewers)
11.9/20
(19.368 M
viewers)
10.8/18
(17.043 M
viewers)
11.8/19
(18.085 M
viewers)
10.0/17
(15.840 M
viewers)
11.8/21
(19.221 M
viewers)
17.9/28
(30.814 M
viewers)
2001 Fox Arizona Diamondbacks 4,
New York Yankees 3
15.7/26
(24.528 M
viewers)
10.4/19
(16.476 M
viewers)
15.0/23
(23.550 M
viewers)
15.4/24
(23.407 M
viewers)
15.8/27
(23.692 M
viewers)
14.4/24
(21.323 M
viewers)
13.8/24
(22.672 M
viewers)
23.5/34
(39.084 M
viewers)
2000 Fox New York Yankees 4,
New York Mets 1
12.4/21
(18.081 M
viewers)
11.5/22
(17.556 M
viewers)
12.6/20
(19.045 M
viewers)
12.4/21
(17.453 M
viewers)
12.5/21
(17.611 M
viewers)
13.1/21
(18.927 M
viewers)
No Game
1999 NBC New York Yankees 4,
Atlanta Braves 0
16.0/26
(23.731 M
viewers)
14.2/26
(22.035 M
viewers)
15.0/23
(22.825 M
viewers)
16.8/27
(24.116 M
viewers)
17.8/29
(25.848 M
viewers)
No Game
1998 Fox New York Yankees 4,
San Diego Padres 0
14.1/24
(20.340 M
viewers)
12.4/23
(18.740 M
viewers)
12.6/20
(17.860 M
viewers)
15.4/25
(21.970 M
viewers)
16.6/27
(23.390 M
viewers)
No Game
1997 NBC Florida Marlins 4,
Cleveland Indians 3
16.7/29
(24.790 M
viewers)
11.3/22
(16.810 M
viewers)
15.0/24
(22.460 M
viewers)
15.6/27
(22.190 M
viewers)
15.5/26
(22.070 M
viewers)
17.2/30
(24.200 M
viewers)
15.5/28
(23.740 M
viewers)
24.5/39
(37.990 M
viewers)
1996 Fox New York Yankees 4,
Atlanta Braves 2
17.4/29
(25.220 M
viewers)
15.7/25
(23.690 M
viewers)
14.0/23
(19.430 M
viewers)
17.5/28
(23.990 M
viewers)
17.9/32
(25.160 M
viewers)
20.0/32
(28.520 M
viewers)
19.1/34
(30.440 M
viewers)
No Game
1995 ABC Atlanta Braves 4,
Cleveland Indians 2
19.5/33
(28.970 M
viewers)
16.4/30
(25.150 M
viewers)
No Game 20.0/33
(28.670 M
viewers)
21.6/34
(31.710 M
viewers)
No Game
NBC No Game 19.4/31
(29.350 M
viewers)
20.0/34
(28.720 M
viewers)
No Game 19.5/35
(30.280 M
viewers)
No Game
1994 Canceled due to the MLB strike
1993 CBS Toronto Blue Jays 4,
Philadelphia Phillies 2
17.3/30
(24.700 M
viewers)
15.5/29
(23.100 M
viewers)
17.9/29
(25.200 M
viewers)
15.2/28
(20.570 M
viewers)
18.0/31
(24.590 M
viewers)
18.4/30
(26.110 M
viewers)
19.1/35
(29.050 M
viewers)
No Game
1992 CBS Toronto Blue Jays 4,
Atlanta Braves 2
20.2/34
(30.010 M
viewers)
15.6/28
(25.020 M
viewers)
20.2/32
(29.590 M
viewers)
20.8/33
(29.980 M
viewers)
18.9/30
(26.410 M
viewers)
21.6/36
(31.230 M
viewers)
22.7/41
(35.000 M
viewers)
No Game
1991 CBS Minnesota Twins 4,
Atlanta Braves 3
24.0/39
(35.680 M
viewers)
17.6/32
(26.310 M
viewers)
21.7/34
(30.840 M
viewers)
23.5/39
(33.170 M
viewers)
22.9/36
(32.100 M
viewers)
22.9/37
(33.180 M
viewers)
25.4/44
(40.830 M
viewers)
32.2/49
(50.340 M
viewers)
1990 CBS Cincinnati Reds 4,
Oakland Athletics 0
20.8/36
(30.240 M
viewers)
20.2/32
(28.600 M
viewers)
21.8/37
(30.570 M
viewers)
19.4/35
(28.720 M
viewers)
21.4/38
(32.910 M
viewers)
No Game
1989 ABC Oakland Athletics 4,
San Francisco Giants 0
16.4/29
(24.550 M
viewers)
16.2/30
(25.030 M
viewers)
17.4/28
(25.410 M
viewers)
17.5/32
(26.610 M
viewers)
14.7/28
(21.640 M
viewers)
No Game
1988 NBC Los Angeles Dodgers 4,
Oakland Athletics 1
23.9/39
(34.490 M
viewers)
20.5/38
(30.350 M
viewers)
23.1/36
(34.700 M
viewers)
24.8/40
(34.990 M
viewers)
24.2/39
(33.960 M
viewers)
27.0/43
(38.800 M
viewers)
No Game
1987 ABC Minnesota Twins 4,
St. Louis Cardinals 3
24.0/41
(35.340 M
viewers)
19.2/35
(30.570 M
viewers)
21.9/34
(33.660 M
viewers)
24.9/40
(34.990 M
viewers)
23.8/38
(34.040 M
viewers)
23.4/38
(32.550 M
viewers)
20.9/47
(29.090 M
viewers)
32.6/50
(51.180 M
viewers)
1986 NBC New York Mets 4,
Boston Red Sox 3
28.6/46
(36.370 M
viewers)
24.2/42
(33.100 M
viewers)
25.5/41
(32.340 M
viewers)
25.6/40
(33.200 M
viewers)
26.0/41
(34.490 M
viewers)
29.8/47
(38.710 M
viewers)
30.3/52
(44.510 M
viewers)
38.9/55
(55–60 M
viewers)
1985 ABC Kansas City Royals 4,
St. Louis Cardinals 3
25.3/39
(34.510 M
viewers)
22.1/37
(31.510 M
viewers)
23.2/35
(31.770 M
viewers)
25.4/38
(32.800 M
viewers)
24.8/38
(35.040 M
viewers)
24.9/38
(30.950 M
viewers)
24.2/41
(34.860 M
viewers)
32.6/47
(45.000 M
viewers)
1984 NBC Detroit Tigers 4,
San Diego Padres 1
22.9/40
(28.010 M
viewers)
27.7/44
(33.860 M
viewers)
26.0/40
(32.010 M
viewers)
21.5/35
(26.810 M
viewers)
15.0/41
(18.020 M
viewers)
22.7/42
(28.580 M
viewers)
No Game

See also

References

  1. ^ "World Series Game 7 Averages Over 40 Million Viewers – Fox Sports PressPass". Retrieved 22 March 2017.
  2. ^ Press, Associated. "MLB: World Series ratings not like 2016 - Los Angeles Times". latimes.com. Retrieved 22 October 2018.
  3. ^ a b "World Series 4th-least-watched, averaging 14.1M viewers". Boston Herald. AP. October 30, 2018. Retrieved October 31, 2018.
  4. ^ Pucci, Douglas (October 24, 2018). "Tuesday Final Ratings: Dodgers-Red Sox Draw Four-Year Low for a World Series Game One on Fox". programminginsider.com. Retrieved October 24, 2018.
  5. ^ Pucci, Douglas (October 25, 2018). "Wednesday Final Ratings: World Series on Fox at Four-Year Low Through Two Games". programminginsider.com. Retrieved October 25, 2018.
  6. ^ Pucci, Douglas (October 29, 2018). "Friday Final Ratings: 18-Inning World Series Game Three Helps Fox Quadruple the Runner-Up Network Among Adults 18-49". programminginsider.com. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  7. ^ Pucci, Douglas (October 30, 2018). "Saturday Final Ratings: Fox, with World Series Game Four, More Than Triples Runner-Up ABC Among Adults 18-49". programminginsider.com. Retrieved November 1, 2018.
  8. ^ Pucci, Douglas (October 30, 2018). "Sunday Final Ratings: World Series Game Five on Fox Bests Competing 'Sunday Night Football' NBC Telecast for Third Straight Year". programminginsider.com. Retrieved October 30, 2018.
  9. ^ Paulsen (October 25, 2017). "World Series Game 1 Second-Most Watched Since 2010". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  10. ^ Mitch Metcalf (October 25, 2017). "Top 150 Tuesday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 10.24.2017". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  11. ^ Paulsen (October 27, 2017). "World Series Game 2 Third-Most Watched in a Decade". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  12. ^ Mitch Metcalf (October 26, 2017). "Top 150 Wednesday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 10.25.2017". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  13. ^ Paulsen (October 28, 2017). "World Series Posts Second-Best Game 3 Audience Since 2005". Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  14. ^ Mitch Metcalf (October 30, 2017). "Top 150 Friday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 10.27.2017". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  15. ^ Paulsen (October 29, 2017). "World Series Scores Second-Best Saturday Audience Since 2004". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  16. ^ Mitch Metcalf (October 31, 2017). "Top 150 Saturday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 10.28.2017". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  17. ^ Paulsen (October 31, 2017). "World Series Third-Best in Decade Entering Game 6". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  18. ^ Mitch Metcalf (October 31, 2017). "Top 150 Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 10.29.2017". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  19. ^ Paulsen (November 1, 2017). "Astros-Dodgers Game 6 Among Top World Series Games Since 2004". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  20. ^ Mitch Metcalf (November 1, 2017). "Top 150 Tuesday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 10.31.2017". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  21. ^ Paulsen (November 2, 2017). "Over 28 Million For World Series Game 7". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved November 2, 2017.
  22. ^ Mitch Metcalf (November 2, 2017). "Top 150 Wednesday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 11.1.2017". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved November 2, 2017.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Mitch Metcalf (November 3, 2016). "World Series Ratings through Game 7". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved November 3, 2016.
  24. ^ Paulsen (October 26, 2016). "Fueled By Cubs, World Series Opener is Strongest in Years". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved October 26, 2016.
  25. ^ Mitch Metcalf (October 26, 2016). "Top 150 Tuesday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 10.25.2016". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved October 26, 2016.
  26. ^ Paulsen (October 27, 2016). "World Series Game 2 Dips From Opener, But Still Best Since 2009". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved October 27, 2016.
  27. ^ Mitch Metcalf (October 27, 2016). "Top 150 Wednesday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 10.26.2016". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved October 27, 2016.
  28. ^ Paulsen (October 29, 2016). "World Series' Return to Wrigley Top Game 3 Since 2004". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved October 31, 2016.
  29. ^ Mitch Metcalf (October 31, 2016). "Top 150 Friday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 10.28.2016". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved October 31, 2016.
  30. ^ Paulsen (October 30, 2016). "World Series Scores Best Saturday Night Audience Since 2004". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved November 1, 2016.
  31. ^ Mitch Metcalf (November 1, 2016). "Top 150 Saturday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 10.29.2016". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved November 1, 2016.
  32. ^ Paulsen (October 31, 2016). "Multiple Viewership Milestones For Cubs' Game 5 Win". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved November 1, 2016.
  33. ^ Mitch Metcalf (November 1, 2016). "Top 150 Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 10.30.2016". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved November 1, 2016.
  34. ^ Paulsen (November 2, 2016). "For Second Straight Night, World Series Hits 19-Year Viewership High". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved November 2, 2016.
  35. ^ Mitch Metcalf (November 2, 2016). "Top 150 Tuesday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 11.1.2016". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved November 2, 2016.
  36. ^ Paulsen (November 3, 2016). "Whoa Cubs Whoa: 40 Million Watch Game 7 of the World Series". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved November 3, 2016.
  37. ^ Mitch Metcalf (November 3, 2016). "Top 150 Wednesday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 11.2.2016". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved November 3, 2016.

Further reading

1978 World Series

The 1978 World Series matched the defending champions New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers in a rematch of the previous year's World Series, with the Yankees winning in six games, just like the previous year, to repeat as champions. As of 2018, it remains the most recent World Series to feature a rematch of the previous season's matchup.1978 was the first of ten consecutive years that saw ten different teams win the World Series. The Los Angeles Dodgers would break the string with a World Series win in 1988 (as they won in the 1981 World Series).

This Series had two memorable confrontations between Dodger rookie pitcher Bob Welch and the Yankees' Reggie Jackson. In Game 2, Welch struck Jackson out in the top of the ninth with two outs and the tying and go-ahead runs on base to end the game. Jackson would avenge the strikeout, when in Game 4 he singled off Welch which moved Roy White to second, from which White would score the game winning run on a Lou Piniella single to tie the series at 2-2. In Game 6, Jackson smashed a two-run homer off Welch in the seventh to increase the Yankees' lead to 7–2 and put a final "exclamation point" on the Yankees' victory to win the series.

1980 World Series

The 1980 World Series was the 77th edition of Major League Baseball's championship series and the conclusion of the 1980 Major League Baseball season. A best-of-seven playoff, it matched the National League (NL) champion Philadelphia Phillies against the American League (AL) champion Kansas City Royals. The Phillies defeated the Royals four games to two to capture the club's first World Series championship in franchise history. Phillies third baseman Mike Schmidt was named as the World Series MVP. The series concluded with Game 6, which ended with Tug McGraw striking out Willie Wilson at 11:29 pm on October 21, 1980. Wilson set a World Series record by striking out twelve times (after getting 230 hits in the regular season) in the six-game set.

Game 6 is also significant because it stands as the "most-watched game in World Series history" with a television audience of 54.9 million viewers.The Kansas City Royals became the second expansion team, and the first American League expansion team, to appear in the World Series. The AL would have to wait until 1985 before one of their expansion teams—the Royals themselves—would win a World Series.

This was the first World Series played entirely on artificial turf. This was also the first World Series since 1920, and the last to date, in which neither team had won a World Series before. With their victory, the Phillies became the final team out of the original 16 MLB teams to win a World Series. However, a Philadelphia team had won a World Series before, the last being the Philadelphia Athletics in 1930, exactly a half-century before this Series; in a twist of fate, the Athletics would play 13 years in Kansas City before eventually settling in Oakland.

1989 World Series

The 1989 World Series was the 86th edition of Major League Baseball's championship series, and the conclusion of the 1989 Major League Baseball season. A best-of-seven playoff, it was played between the American League (AL) champion Oakland Athletics and the National League (NL) champion San Francisco Giants. The Series ran from October 14 through October 28, with the Athletics sweeping the Giants in four games. It was the first World Series sweep since 1976, when the Cincinnati Reds swept the New York Yankees. The four-game sweep by the Athletics at the time would mark only the third time in World Series history that a team never trailed in any game, with the 1963 Los Angeles Dodgers, 1966 Baltimore Orioles, and 2004 Boston Red Sox being the only other times this occurred, and the first in the playoff era (post-1968).

This marked the fourth World Series matchup, and first since 1913, between the two franchises. The previous three matchups occurred when the Giants were in New York and the Athletics resided in Philadelphia. The then New York Giants defeated the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1905 World Series four games to one, the Athletics defeating the Giants in the 1911 World Series four games to two, and then again in the 1913 Fall Classic four games to one. The series would be historic in other ways as well: the 76-year gap between matchups was the longest in World Series history, a record this World Series would hold until 2018 when the Red Sox and Dodgers met for their first World Series meeting in 102 years; it also marked the first time two franchises had faced off in the World Series after having once played each other when both were based in a different city.

Fay Vincent, who had just taken over as Commissioner of Baseball after the sudden death of his predecessor Bart Giamatti in September, presided over his first World Series and dedicated it to his predecessor's memory.This Series was also known as the "Bay Bridge Series," "BART Series," "Battle of the Bay," and "Earthquake Series" as the two participant cities lie on opposite sides of San Francisco Bay, connected by the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge and the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system, and the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake that occurred before the start of Game 3. It was the first cross-town World Series (involving two teams from the same metropolitan area) since 1956, and only the third such series that did not involve New York City (the 1906 and 1944 World Series, which featured matchups between Chicago and St. Louis teams, were the others).

On October 17, just minutes before the scheduled start of Game 3, a magnitude 6.9 earthquake struck the Bay Area causing significant damage to both Oakland and San Francisco. Candlestick Park in San Francisco suffered damage to its upper deck as pieces of concrete fell from the baffle at the top of the stadium and the power was knocked out. The game was postponed out of concerns for the safety of everyone in the ballpark as well as the loss of power, with Vincent later saying that he did not know when play would resume. The series resumed on October 27 and finished the next day.

At the time, October 28 was the latest end date ever for a World Series, even though the series only lasted the minimum four games. (The 1981 World Series, which went six games, had also ended on October 28. This record was tied again in 1995, and has since been surpassed several times. The World Series now regularly concludes at the end of October or beginning of November due to the addition of the Division Series and Wild Card Games to the postseason.)

2005 World Series

The 2005 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2005 season. The 101st edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the American League (AL) champion Chicago White Sox and the National League (NL) champion Houston Astros; the White Sox swept the Astros in four games, winning their third World Series championship and their first in 88 seasons. Although the series was a sweep, all four games were quite close, being decided by two runs or fewer. The series was played between October 22–26, 2005.

Home-field advantage was awarded to Chicago by virtue of the AL's 7–5 victory over the NL in the 2005 MLB All-Star Game. The Astros were attempting to become the fourth consecutive wild card team to win the Series, following the Anaheim Angels (2002), Florida Marlins (2003) and Boston Red Sox (2004). Both teams were attempting to overcome decades of disappointment, with a combined 132 years between the two teams without a title. The Astros were making their first Series appearance in 44 years of play, while the White Sox had waited exactly twice as long for a title, having last won the Series in 1917, and had not been in the Series since 1959, three years before the Astros' inaugural season.

Like the 1982 World Series between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Milwaukee Brewers, the 2005 World Series is one of only two World Series in the modern era (1903–present) with no possibility for a rematch between the two opponents, because the Astros moved to the AL in 2013. However, the Brewers did meet the Cardinals in the 2011 NL Championship Series. The Astros would return to the World Series in 2017 as an AL franchise, where they would win in seven games against the Los Angeles Dodgers.

2006 World Series

The 2006 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2006 season. The 102nd edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the American League (AL) champion Detroit Tigers and the National League (NL) champion St. Louis Cardinals; the Cardinals won the series in five games, taking games one, three, four, and five. This was the third World Series meeting between the Tigers and the Cardinals, the first in 38 years. The Cardinals won the first in 1934, and the Tigers won the second in 1968; each went the full seven games.

It was only the fifth time in 40 years that the Series featured two teams that had both remained in the same city since the formation of the AL in 1901, the last time being the 2004 World Series between St. Louis and the Boston Red Sox. The last three prior to 2004 were in 1975 (Boston–Cincinnati), 1968 (Detroit–St. Louis) and 1967 (Boston–St. Louis).

The Cardinals, who moved into Busch Stadium in April, became the fourth team to win the Series in their home stadium's debut season, joining the 1909 Pittsburgh Pirates (Forbes Field), 1912 Boston Red Sox (Fenway Park) and 1923 New York Yankees (Yankee Stadium (I)). In 2009, they would be joined by the 2009 New York Yankees (Yankee Stadium). St. Louis also won their 10th Fall Classic, the most of any National League franchise, and second to only the Yankees' 27 (then 26) titles, and their first since 1982. Cardinals manager Tony La Russa, who won the 1989 World Series title with the Athletics, became the second manager in history to lead teams in both leagues to championships, joining Sparky Anderson. Tigers manager Jim Leyland, who won the 1997 World Series title with the Marlins, also could have become the second manager in history to lead teams in both leagues to championships, had the Tigers won the series.

The Cardinals finished the regular season 83–78. This is the second-worst record ever for a league champion (the 1973 New York Mets finished 82–79) and the worst record ever for a World Series champion. Previously the 1987 Minnesota Twins finished 85–77 and defeated the Cardinals in the 1987 World Series.

2009 World Series

The 2009 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2009 season. As the 105th edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff contested between the Philadelphia Phillies, champions of the National League (NL) and defending World Series champions, and the New York Yankees, champions of the American League (AL). The Yankees defeated the Phillies, 4 games to 2, winning their 27th World Series championship. The series was played between October 28 and November 4, broadcast on Fox, and watched by an average of roughly 19 million viewers. Due to the start of the season being pushed back by the 2009 World Baseball Classic in March, this was the first World Series regularly scheduled to be played into the month of November. This series was a rematch of the 1950 World Series.

Home field advantage for the Series went to the AL for the eighth straight year as a result of its 4–3 win in the All-Star Game. The Phillies earned their berth into the playoffs by winning the National League East. The Yankees won the American League East to earn their berth, posting the best record in the Major Leagues. The Phillies reached the World Series by defeating the Colorado Rockies in the best-of-five National League Division Series, and the Los Angeles Dodgers in the best-of-seven NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Yankees defeated the Minnesota Twins in the American League Division Series and the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in the AL Championship Series (ALCS) to advance to their first World Series since 2003. As a result of their loss, the Phillies became the first team since the 2001 Yankees to lose the World Series after winning it the previous year.

Cliff Lee pitched a complete game in the Phillies' Game 1 victory, allowing only one unearned run, while Chase Utley hit two home runs. In Game 2, solo home runs by Mark Teixeira and Hideki Matsui helped the Yankees win by a score of 3–1. After a rain delayed start, Game 3 featured more offense, with a combined six home runs and thirteen total runs en route to a Yankee victory. The Yankees won Game 4 by scoring the decisive three runs in the ninth inning after an alert base running play by Johnny Damon. The Phillies avoided elimination with a win in Game 5, aided by Utley's second two–home run game of the series. The Yankees secured their World Series championship with a Game 6 victory in which Matsui hit his third home run of the series. He was named Most Valuable Player (MVP) of the series, making him the first Japanese-born player and the first full-time designated hitter to win the award; Matsui was the series' MVP despite starting only the three games that were played at Yankee Stadium, since the designated hitter position is not used in NL ballparks.

Several records were tied, extended, or broken during this World Series, including team championships (Yankees with 27), career postseason wins (Andy Pettitte with 18), career World Series saves (Mariano Rivera with 11), home runs in a World Series (Utley with five), strikeouts by a hitter in a World Series (Ryan Howard with 13), and runs batted in in a single World Series game (Matsui with six).

2011 World Series

The 2011 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2011 season. The 107th edition of World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff played between the American League (AL) champion Texas Rangers and the National League (NL) champion St. Louis Cardinals; the Cardinals defeated the Rangers in seven games to win their 11th World Series championship and their first since 2006.

The Series was noted for its back-and-forth Game 6, in which the Cardinals erased a two-run deficit in the bottom of the ninth inning, then did it again in the 10th. In both innings, the Rangers were one strike away from their first World Series championship. The Cardinals won the game in the 11th inning on a walk-off home run by David Freese. The Series was also known for the blowout Game 3, in which Cardinals player Albert Pujols hit three home runs, a World Series feat previously accomplished only by Reggie Jackson and Babe Ruth, and subsequently by Pablo Sandoval (in 2012).

The Series began on October 19, earlier than the previous season so that no games would be played in November. The Cardinals enjoyed home-field advantage for the series because the NL won the 2011 All-Star Game 5–1 on July 12. The 2011 World Series was the first World Series to go all seven games since the 2002 Series.

2013 World Series

The 2013 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2013 season. The 109th edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the American League (AL) champion Boston Red Sox and the National League (NL) champion St. Louis Cardinals; the Red Sox won, 4 games to 2. The Red Sox had home field advantage for the series, based on the AL's win in the 2013 MLB All-Star Game on July 16. This was the first World Series since 1999 to feature both #1 seeds from the American League and National League. The Series started on Wednesday, October 23, ending on Game 6 the following Wednesday, October 30, 2013.

The Red Sox won the first game at Fenway Park on October 23, followed by the Cardinals winning the second game on October 24 to tie the series 1–1. The series then moved to Busch Stadium, where the Cardinals won the third game on October 26 to gain a 2–1 lead. The Red Sox won the fourth game on October 27 to tie the series at 2–2, then won the last of three games at Busch Stadium on October 28 for a 3–2 lead. The series then moved back to Fenway Park, where the Red Sox decisively won the final game on October 30, becoming the World Series champions for 2013.

This was the fourth meeting of the Cardinals and the Red Sox in the World Series (previously meeting in 1946, 1967, and 2004). Winning in six games, the Red Sox clinched their first World Series championship at their home field of Fenway Park since 1918, and the last such Series to date won by the home team. David Ortiz was awarded the World Series Most Valuable Player Award. He became the first non-Yankee to win three World Series titles with one team since Jim Palmer (Baltimore Orioles 1966, 1970, and 1983).

List of World Series broadcasters

The following is a list of national American television and radio networks and announcers that have broadcast World Series games over the years. It does include any announcers who may have appeared on local radio broadcasts produced by the participating teams.

Major League Baseball on NBC

Major League Baseball on NBC is the de facto branding for weekly broadcasts of Major League Baseball (MLB) games produced by NBC Sports, and televised on the NBC television network. Major League Baseball games first aired on the network from 1947 to 1989, when CBS acquired the broadcast television rights; games returned to the network in 1994 with coverage lasting until 2000. There have been several variations of the program dating back to the 1940s, including The NBC Game of the Week and Baseball Night in America.

NBA Finals television ratings

This is a list of television ratings for NBA Finals in the United States, based on Nielsen viewing data.

The highest rated and most watched NBA Final series was 1998 NBA Finals between the Chicago Bulls and Utah Jazz,; the series averaged an 18.7 rating / 33 share and 29.04 million viewers on NBC. The lowest rated and least watched NBA Final series was 2007 NBA Finals between the San Antonio Spurs and Cleveland Cavaliers; the series averaged a 6.2 rating / 11 share and 9.29 million viewers on ABC.

The highest rated and most watched NBA Final game was Game 6 of the 1998 NBA Finals which averaged a 22.3 rating / 38 share and 35.89 million viewers on Sunday night. The lowest rated and least watched NBA Final game was Game 2 of the 2003 NBA Finals which averaged a 5.2 rating / 10 share and 8.06 million viewers on Friday night.

The 1987 NBA Finals between the Los Angeles Lakers and Boston Celtics was the highest rated and most watched NBA Final series on CBS averaging a 15.9 rating / 32 share and 24.12 million viewers. Game 7 of the 1988 NBA Finals registered the network's highest rated and most watched NBA game with a 21.2 rating / 37 share.

The 2015 NBA Finals between the Golden State Warriors and Cleveland Cavaliers was the highest rated NBA Final series on ABC averaging an 11.6 rating / 21 share and 19.94 million viewers. The 2017 NBA Finals featuring the same two teams was the most watched NBA Final series on ABC averaging an 11.3 rating / 22 share and 20.38 million viewers. Game 7 of the 2016 NBA Finals registered the network's highest rated and most watched NBA game with an average 15.8 rating / 29 share and 31.02 million viewers while peaking with a whopping 22.5 rating and 90.51 million viewers in the last 5 minutes of the game. It was the first basketball game to draw more than 30 million average viewers in 18 years, and only the seventh sports telecast (excluding NFL and Olympics) to have done so since 1998.The 2019 NBA Finals between the Golden State Warriors and the Toronto Raptors had a drop in American viewership. Analysts cited both the presence of a Canadian team (Canadian viewership does not count towards U.S. Nielsen ratings, leading to only one U.S. home market being reflected in viewership), and being the first NBA Finals not to feature a team with LeBron James since 2010, as factors in the drop. However, the presence of the Toronto Raptors in the NBA Finals boosted Canadian viewership to record levels. For Canadian viewership numbers, see the Viewership section of the 2019 NBA Finals.

Soccer in the United States

Soccer in the United States is governed by the United States Soccer Federation. The organization governs most levels of soccer in the country, including the national teams, professional leagues, and the amateur game with the exception of colleges and high schools. As of May 2015, over 24.4 million people play soccer in the United States. In 2017, Gallup reported that soccer was the third-most played team sport in the U.S., behind only basketball and American football. The popularity of the sport in the U.S. has been growing since the 1960s and 1970s and received a significant boost when the United States hosted the 1994 FIFA World Cup and 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup. It is the fourth most popular sport in the United States behind American football, baseball, and basketball, and is the second fastest growing sport in America, surpassed only by lacrosse.The highest-level men's professional soccer league in the U.S. is Major League Soccer. MLS began to play in 1996 with 10 teams and has grown to 24 teams (21 in the United States and 3 in Canada), with further expansion planned to 30 teams. MLS is currently the largest first division professional soccer league in the world. The MLS season runs from March to December, with the regular-season winner awarded the Supporters' Shield and the post-season winner awarded the MLS Cup. With an average attendance of over 20,000 per game, MLS has the third highest average attendance of any sports league in the U.S. after the National Football League (NFL) and Major League Baseball (MLB), and is the seventh highest attended professional soccer league worldwide.The first women's professional soccer league in the U.S. formed after the success of the 1999 Women's World Cup. The Women's United Soccer Association (WUSA) ran from 2001–2003 and featured many of the World Cup stars, including Mia Hamm, Michelle Akers and Brandi Chastain. Its successor Women's Professional Soccer (WPS) ran from 2009–2012. Currently, the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL) is the top professional league in the country and was formed in 2012. The NWSL season runs from spring to early fall (typically April – October). In 2017, A&E Networks bought an equity stake in the league and broadcasts a game of the week on Lifetime, and formerly streamed all games online via the go90 platform. During the 2018 season, the NWSL moved some of the games originally scheduled to air on Lifetime to evening slots on ESPNews (both channels being part of the Disney family), and when go90 owner Verizon shut down that platform at the end of July, the NWSL streamed the games that were intended for go90 on its own website.U.S. soccer fans also follow the U.S. national teams in international competition. The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Final drew a record 26.7 million viewers, greater than final games of the 2014 World Series or the 2015 NBA Finals, and the 2010 Men's World Cup final drew 26.5 million viewers. The women's national team has won four Women's World Cup titles and four gold medals at the Summer Olympics and the men's national team played in every World Cup from 1990 to 2014.

Stanley Cup Finals television ratings

The following is an overview of the television ratings for the National Hockey League (NHL)'s Stanley Cup Finals in both the United States and Canada.

Super Bowl television ratings

Super Bowl television ratings have traditionally been high. One of the most watched annual sporting events in the world, the NFL's championship game is broadcast in over 130 countries in more than 30 languages. However, viewership is predominantly North American; the Super Bowl is the most watched television broadcast in the United States every year.

The Baseball Network

The Baseball Network was a short-lived television broadcasting joint venture between ABC, NBC and Major League Baseball. Under the arrangement, beginning in the 1994 season, the league produced its own in-house telecasts of games, which were then brokered to air on ABC and NBC. This was perhaps most evident by the copyright beds shown at the end of the telecasts, which stated "The proceeding program has been paid for by the office of The Commissioner of Baseball". The Baseball Network was the first television network in the United States to be owned by a professional sports league. In essence, The Baseball Network could be seen as a forerunner to the MLB Network, which would debut about 15 years later.

The package included coverage of games in primetime on selected nights throughout the regular season (under the branding Baseball Night in America), along with coverage of the postseason and the World Series. Unlike previous broadcasting arrangements with the league, there was no national "game of the week" during the regular season; these would be replaced by multiple weekly regional telecasts on certain nights of the week. Additionally, The Baseball Network had exclusive coverage windows; no other broadcaster could televise MLB games during the same night that The Baseball Network was televising games.

The arrangement did not last long; due to the effects of a players' strike on the remainder of the 1994 season, and poor reception from fans and critics over how the coverage was implemented, The Baseball Network would be disbanded after the 1995 season. While NBC would maintain rights to certain games, the growing Fox network (having established its own sports division two years earlier in 1994) became the league's new national broadcast partner beginning in 1996, with its then-parent company News Corporation eventually purchasing the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1998 (although the company has since sold the team).

World Series

The World Series is the annual championship series of Major League Baseball (MLB) in North America, contested since 1903 between the American League (AL) champion team and the National League (NL) champion team. The winner of the World Series championship is determined through a best-of-seven playoff, and the winning team is awarded the Commissioner's Trophy. As the series is played during the fall season in North America, it is sometimes referred to as the Fall Classic.Prior to 1969, the team with the best regular season win-loss record in each league automatically advanced to the World Series; since then each league has conducted a championship series (ALCS and NLCS) preceding the World Series to determine which teams will advance. As of 2018, the World Series has been contested 114 times, with the AL winning 66 and the NL winning 48.

The 2018 World Series took place between the Los Angeles Dodgers and Boston Red Sox from October 23–28, with the Red Sox winning in five games to earn their ninth title. This was the first World Series meeting between these two teams since 1916. Having previously lost to the Houston Astros in the 2017 World Series, the Dodgers became the 11th team to lose the World Series in consecutive seasons.In the American League, the New York Yankees have played in 40 World Series and won 27, the Philadelphia/Kansas City/Oakland Athletics have played in 14 and won 9, and the Boston Red Sox have played in 13 and won 9, including the first World Series. In the National League, the St. Louis Cardinals have appeared in 19 and won 11, the New York/San Francisco Giants have played in 19 and won 8, the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers have appeared in 20 and won 6, and the Cincinnati Reds have appeared in 9 and won 5.

As of 2018, no team has won consecutive World Series championships since the New York Yankees in 1998, 1999, and 2000—the longest such drought in Major League Baseball history.

Until 2002, home-field advantage in the World Series alternated from year to year between the National League and American League. From 2003 to 2016, home-field advantage was given to the league that won that year's All-Star Game. Starting in 2017, home-field advantage is awarded to the league champion team with the better regular season win-loss record.

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