World Series Most Valuable Player Award

The Willie Mays World Series Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award is given to the player deemed to have the most impact on his team's performance in the World Series,[1] which is the final round of the Major League Baseball (MLB) postseason. The award was first presented in 1955 as the SPORT Magazine Award, but is now decided during the final game of the Series by a committee of reporters and officials present at the game.[2] On September 29, 2017, it was renamed in honor of Willie Mays in remembrance of the 63rd anniversary of The Catch.[3] Mays never won the award himself.

Pitchers have been named Series MVP twenty-seven times; four of them were relief pitchers. Twelve of the first fourteen World Series MVPs were won by pitchers; from 1969 until 1986, the proportion of pitcher MVPs declined—Rollie Fingers (1974) and Bret Saberhagen (1985) were the only two pitchers to win the award in this period. From 1987 until 1991, all of the World Series MVPs were pitchers, and, since 1995, pitchers have won the award nine times. Bobby Richardson of the 1960 New York Yankees is the only player in World Series history to be named MVP despite being on the losing team.

The most recent winner was Steve Pearce of the Boston Red Sox, who won the award in 2018.

Willie Mays World Series MVP Award
Given forAnnual most valuable player of the World Series
CountryUnited States
Presented byMajor League Baseball
History
First award1955
Most recentSteve Pearce, 2018 Boston Red Sox
Reggie Jackson
Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson won the 1973 and 1977 World Series MVPs. Jackson hit five home runs in the 1977 World Series, and took the nickname "Mr. October".

Winners

DonLarsen
Don Larsen won the World Series MVP in the 1956 World Series with the New York Yankees. Larsen is the only pitcher to pitch a perfect game in World Series history.
Brooks Robinson 1955
Hall of Famer Brooks Robinson won the 1970 World Series MVP Award.
Rollie Fingers
Hall of Famer Rollie Fingers won the 1974 World Series MVP with the Oakland Athletics.
Pete Rose 2008
Pete Rose won the 1975 World Series MVP with the Cincinnati Reds, and became the second third baseman to win the award.
Bench Johnny
Hall of Famer Johnny Bench won the World Series MVP in the 1976 World Series.
Mike Schmidt
Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt won the 1980 World Series MVP with the Philadelphia Phillies.
Steve Yeager 2008 NLCS
Steve Yeager was one of the three 1981 World Series MVPs for the Los Angeles Dodgers.
Orelhershiser
Orel Hershiser won the NL Cy Young Award, the NLCS MVP and the World Series MVP in the 1988 season.
Tom Glavine Pitching 1993
Tom Glavine won the World Series MVP in the 1995 World Series with the Atlanta Braves.
Derek Jeter batting stance allison
Derek Jeter won the World Series MVP in 2000 World Series with the New York Yankees.
Randy Johnson 04
Randy Johnson (top) and Curt Schilling shared the World Series MVP Award in 2001.
DSC02300 Troy Glaus
Troy Glaus won the MVP award in 2002 with the Anaheim Angels.
Mike Lowell2
Mike Lowell won the World Series MVP in the 2007 World Series with the Boston Red Sox.
Hideki Matsui in USA-7
In 2009, Hideki Matsui became the first Japanese-born player, as well as the first full-time designated hitter, to win the award.
Ben Zobrist with 2016 World Series MVP trophy
Ben Zobrist won the MVP award in 2016 with the Chicago Cubs.
George Springer on August 18, 2016
George Springer won the MVP award in 2017 for the Houston Astros.
Key
Year Links to the article about that corresponding World Series
dagger Member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum
double-dagger Active player
* Indicates player also won the LCS MVP Award in the same postseason
§ Indicates losing team in the World Series
^ Indicates multiple award winners in the same World Series
(#) Indicates number of times winning World Series MVP at that point (if he won multiple times)
Year Player Team Position Selected statistics Note
1955 Johnny Podres Brooklyn Dodgers Starting pitcher [4]
1956 Don Larsen New York Yankees Starting pitcher [6]
1957 Lew Burdette Milwaukee Braves Starting pitcher [7]
1958 Bob Turley New York Yankees Pitcher [8]
1959 Larry Sherry Los Angeles Dodgers Relief pitcher [9]
1960 Bobby Richardson New York Yankees§ Second baseman [10]
1961 Whitey Forddagger New York Yankees Starting pitcher [11]
1962 Ralph Terry New York Yankees Starting pitcher [12]
1963 Sandy Koufaxdagger Los Angeles Dodgers Starting pitcher [13]
1964 Bob Gibsondagger St. Louis Cardinals Starting pitcher [14]
1965 Sandy Koufaxdagger (2) Los Angeles Dodgers Starting pitcher [15]
1966 Frank Robinsondagger Baltimore Orioles Outfielder [16]
1967 Bob Gibsondagger (2) St. Louis Cardinals Starting pitcher [17]
1968 Mickey Lolich Detroit Tigers Starting pitcher [18]
1969 Donn Clendenon New York Mets First baseman [19]
1970 Brooks Robinsondagger Baltimore Orioles Third baseman [20]
1971 Roberto Clementedagger Pittsburgh Pirates Outfielder [21]
1972 Gene Tenace Oakland Athletics Catcher [22]
1973 Reggie Jacksondagger Oakland Athletics Outfielder [23]
1974 Rollie Fingersdagger Oakland Athletics Relief pitcher [24]
1975 Pete Rose Cincinnati Reds Third baseman [25]
1976 Johnny Benchdagger Cincinnati Reds Catcher [26]
1977 Reggie Jacksondagger (2) New York Yankees Outfielder [27]
1978 Bucky Dent New York Yankees Shortstop [28]
1979* Willie Stargelldagger Pittsburgh Pirates First baseman [29]
1980 Mike Schmidtdagger Philadelphia Phillies Third baseman [30]
1981^ Ron Cey Los Angeles Dodgers Third baseman [31]
1981^ Pedro Guerrero Los Angeles Dodgers Outfielder [31]
1981^ Steve Yeager Los Angeles Dodgers Catcher [31]
1982* Darrell Porter St. Louis Cardinals Catcher [32]
1983 Rick Dempsey Baltimore Orioles Catcher [33]
1984 Alan Trammelldagger Detroit Tigers Shortstop [34]
1985 Bret Saberhagen Kansas City Royals Starting pitcher [35]
1986 Ray Knight New York Mets Third baseman [36]
1987 Frank Viola Minnesota Twins Starting pitcher [37]
1988* Orel Hershiser Los Angeles Dodgers Starting pitcher [38]
1989 Dave Stewart Oakland Athletics Starting pitcher [39]
1990 José Rijo Cincinnati Reds Starting pitcher [40]
1991 Jack Morrisdagger Minnesota Twins Starting pitcher [41]
1992 Pat Borders Toronto Blue Jays Catcher [42]
1993 Paul Molitordagger Toronto Blue Jays Designated hitter, first baseman, third baseman [43]
1994
Series cancelled due to player's strike [44]
1995 Tom Glavinedagger Atlanta Braves Starting pitcher [45]
1996 John Wetteland New York Yankees Relief pitcher [46]
1997* Liván Hernández Florida Marlins Starting pitcher [47][48]
1998 Scott Brosius New York Yankees Third baseman [49]
1999 Mariano Riveradagger New York Yankees Relief pitcher [50][51]
2000 Derek Jeter New York Yankees Shortstop [52][53]
2001^ Randy Johnsondagger Arizona Diamondbacks Pitcher [54][55]
2001^ Curt Schilling Arizona Diamondbacks Starting pitcher [54][56]
2002 Troy Glaus Anaheim Angels Third baseman [57][58]
2003 Josh Beckett Florida Marlins Starting pitcher [59][60]
2004 Manny Ramirez Boston Red Sox Outfielder [61][62]
2005 Jermaine Dye Chicago White Sox Outfielder [63][64]
2006 David Eckstein St. Louis Cardinals Shortstop [65][66]
2007 Mike Lowell Boston Red Sox Third baseman [67][68]
2008* Cole Hamelsdouble-dagger Philadelphia Phillies Starting pitcher [69][70]
2009 Hideki Matsui New York Yankees Designated hitter [71][72]
2010 Edgar Rentería San Francisco Giants Shortstop [73][74]
2011* David Freesedouble-dagger St. Louis Cardinals Third baseman [75][76]
2012 Pablo Sandovaldouble-dagger San Francisco Giants Third baseman [77][78]
2013 David Ortiz Boston Red Sox Designated hitter [79][80][81]
2014* Madison Bumgarnerdouble-dagger San Francisco Giants Starting pitcher [82][83][84]
2015 Salvador Pérezdouble-dagger Kansas City Royals Catcher [85]
2016 Ben Zobristdouble-dagger Chicago Cubs Outfielder [86]
2017 George Springerdouble-dagger Houston Astros Outfielder [87]
2018 Steve Pearcedouble-dagger Boston Red Sox First baseman [88]

By team

World Series MVPs by team
Team Total
New York Yankees 12
Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers 8
St. Louis Cardinals 5
Boston Red Sox 4
Oakland Athletics 4
Baltimore Orioles 3
Cincinnati Reds 3
San Francisco Giants 3
Arizona Diamondbacks 2
Detroit Tigers 2
Florida Marlins 2
Kansas City Royals 2
Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves 2
Minnesota Twins 2
New York Mets 2
Philadelphia Phillies 2
Pittsburgh Pirates 2
Toronto Blue Jays 2
Anaheim Angels 1
Chicago Cubs 1
Chicago White Sox 1
Houston Astros 1

By position

World Series MVPs by position
Position Total
Pitcher (includes starting and relief) 28
Third baseman 10
Outfielder 9
Catcher 7
Shortstop 5
Designated hitter 3
First baseman 3
Second baseman 1

Multiple winners

Player Position Wins Years
Sandy Koufax starting pitcher 2 1963, 1965
Bob Gibson starting pitcher 2 1964, 1967
Reggie Jackson outfielder 2 1973, 1977

See also

Notes

Sandy Koufax
Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax won the award twice.
  • Three players have won the award twice: Sandy Koufax (1963, 1965), Gibson (1964, 1967), and Jackson (1973, 1977); Jackson is the only player to have won the award with two different teams. There have been two occasions on which multiple winners were awarded in the same World Series: Ron Cey, Pedro Guerrero, and Steve Yeager in 1981,[31] and Johnson and Schilling in 2001. The duo of Johnson and Schilling combined for all four of Arizona's wins in the 2001 World Series; Johnson had three of them.[54]
  • Twelve of the fifty-eight World Series MVPs have also won the MLB MVP, the Cy Young Award, or the LCS MVP in the same season. Koufax (1963), Frank Robinson (1966), Jackson (1973), Stargell, and Mike Schmidt (1980) are the only players to have won the MLB MVP and the World Series MVP. A total of six players won the Cy Young Award and the World Series MVP in the same season: Bob Turley (1958), Whitey Ford (1961), Koufax (1963, 1965), Bret Saberhagen (1985), Orel Hershiser (1988), and Johnson (2001). Seven players have won the World Series MVP in the same season in which they won the LCS MVP: Stargell (1979), Darrell Porter (1982), Hershiser (1988), Liván Hernández (1997), Cole Hamels (2008), David Freese (2011), and Madison Bumgarner (2014)—all of them were the NLCS MVPs. Koufax (1963) is the only person to have won the Cy Young Award, the MLB MVP, and the World Series MVP in the same season, while Stargell (1979) is the only person to have won the MLB MVP, the LCS MVP and the World Series MVP in the same season. Hershiser (1988) won the Cy Young Award, the LCS MVP and the World Series MVP in the same season.[100][101][102]
  • In the 4th inning of the 2015 All Star Game, 2014 World Series MVP Madison Bumgarner pitched to future 2015 World Series MVP Salvador Pérez, who struck out but reached first due to a passed ball. This was the first time the previous year's MVP faced the current year's future MVP in the All Star Game. Bumgarner and Pérez also faced each other in the final play of the 2014 World Series: Pérez popped out.

References

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Bret Saberhagen

Bret William Saberhagen (; born April 11, 1964) is an American former professional baseball right-handed starting pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Kansas City Royals, New York Mets, Colorado Rockies, and Boston Red Sox from 1984 through 1999, and a comeback in 2001.

Saberhagen is a three-time All-Star, a two-time Cy Young Award winner, and a Gold Glove Award winner. He led MLB in wins and earned run average in 1989, and threw a no-hitter in 1991.

Bucky Dent

Russell Earl "Bucky" Dent (born Russell Earl O'Dey; November 25, 1951) is an American former Major League Baseball player and manager. He earned two World Series rings as the starting shortstop for the New York Yankees in 1977 and 1978, both over the Los Angeles Dodgers in six games, and he was voted the World Series MVP in 1978. Dent is most famous for his home run in a tie-breaker game against the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park at the end of the 1978 regular season.

College World Series Most Outstanding Player

The College World Series Most Outstanding Player is an award for the best individual performance during the College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska. The recipient of the award is announced at the completion of the College World Series Championship Game. The award is similar to Major League Baseball's World Series Most Valuable Player award.

Since 1999, the winner of the award has received a miniature replica of "The Road to Omaha" sculpture, which is situated at TD Ameritrade Park Omaha. The award measures 16 inches high. There have been 10 recipients of this award who were on not on the winning team of the College World Series. The College World Series started in 1947 but the award was not given out until 1949.

David Eckstein

David Mark Eckstein (; born January 20, 1975) is a retired American professional baseball player who was an infielder in Major League Baseball for ten seasons. He played college baseball for the University of Florida, and has played professionally for the Anaheim Angels, St. Louis Cardinals, Toronto Blue Jays, Arizona Diamondbacks and San Diego Padres. Eckstein won the 2006 World Series Most Valuable Player Award.

Don Larsen

Don James Larsen (born August 7, 1929) is an American retired Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. During a 15-year MLB career, he pitched from 1953 to 1967 for seven different teams. Larsen pitched for the St. Louis Browns / Baltimore Orioles (1953–54; 1965), New York Yankees (1955–59), Kansas City Athletics (1960–1961), Chicago White Sox (1961), San Francisco Giants (1962–64), Houston Colt .45's / Houston Astros (1964–65), and Chicago Cubs (1967).

Larsen pitched the sixth perfect game in MLB history, doing so in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series. It is the only no-hitter and perfect game in World Series history and is one of only two no hitters in MLB postseason history (the other Roy Halladay's in 2010). He won the World Series Most Valuable Player Award and Babe Ruth Award in recognition of his 1956 postseason.

Gene Tenace

Fury Gene Tenace (; born Fiore Gino Tennaci; October 10, 1946), better known as Gene Tenace, is an American former professional baseball player and coach in Major League Baseball. He was a catcher and first baseman from 1969 through 1983. Tenace was drafted by the Kansas City Athletics from Valley High School in Lucasville, Ohio and played for the Oakland Athletics, San Diego Padres, St. Louis Cardinals and the Pittsburgh Pirates. He batted and threw right-handed. Tenace was one of the top catchers of his era and won the 1972 World Series Most Valuable Player Award. After his playing days ended, Tenace coached for several organizations, most notably for the Toronto Blue Jays.

Hideki Matsui

Hideki Matsui (松井 秀喜, Matsui Hideki, born June 12, 1974), nicknamed "Godzilla", is a Japanese former professional baseball outfielder and designated hitter who played baseball in Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) and Major League Baseball (MLB). He batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

After playing the first ten seasons of his career for the Yomiuri Giants of NPB, he played the next seven seasons, from 2003–2009, for the New York Yankees of MLB. As a free agent, Matsui then had one-year stints with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, the Oakland Athletics, and the Tampa Bay Rays. Matsui was successful in both leagues, winning the Central League Most Valuable Player Award three times in NPB, as well as the World Series Most Valuable Player Award in MLB. On July 28, 2013, Matsui signed a one-day minor league contract with the New York Yankees in order to officially retire as a Yankee. A pregame ceremony was held for him.

Jermaine Dye

Jermaine Trevell Dye (born January 28, 1974) is an American former professional baseball right fielder. Dye grew up in Northern California and was a multi-sport star at Will C. Wood High School in Vacaville. Dye attended Cosumnes River College in Sacramento, where he played as a right fielder on a team that reached the playoffs. Dye played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Atlanta Braves (1996), Kansas City Royals (1997–2001), Oakland Athletics (2001–2004), and the Chicago White Sox (2005–2009). He won the World Series MVP with the White Sox in 2005. Dye batted and threw right-handed and, in his prime, was known for his ability to hit for power and his powerful throwing arm. Dye announced his retirement on March 31, 2011.

John Wetteland

John Karl Wetteland (born August 21, 1966) is a retired American baseball pitcher who played 12 seasons in Major League Baseball (1989–2000). He pitched for four teams: the Los Angeles Dodgers, Montreal Expos, New York Yankees, and Texas Rangers. A relief pitcher, Wetteland specialized as a closer, recording 330 saves during his career. With the Yankees, he won the 1996 World Series and won the World Series Most Valuable Player Award for saving four games in the series. After his playing career, he served as a coach for the Washington Nationals and Seattle Mariners.

In 2019, Wetteland was arrested and indicted on charges of sexually abusing a child under the age of 14.

Johnny Podres

John Joseph Podres (September 30, 1932 – January 13, 2008) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who spent most of his career with the Brooklyn / Los Angeles Dodgers. He is perhaps best remembered for being named the Most Valuable Player of the 1955 World Series, pitching a shutout in Game 7 against the New York Yankees to help the Brooklyn Dodgers win their only World Series title before the team moved to Los Angeles after the 1957 season. He led the National League in earned run average and shutouts in 1957, and in winning percentage in 1961. He was of Lithuanian-Polish descent.

Larry Sherry

Lawrence Sherry (July 25, 1935 – December 17, 2006) was an American right-handed relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who spent most of his career with the Los Angeles Dodgers and Detroit Tigers. He was named the Most Valuable Player of the 1959 World Series as the Dodgers won their first championship since relocating from Brooklyn just two years earlier.

Mickey Lolich

Michael Stephen Lolich (born September 12, 1940) is an American former professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a pitcher from 1962 until 1979, most notably for the Detroit Tigers. He is best known for his performance in the 1968 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals when he earned three complete-game victories, including a win over Bob Gibson in the climactic Game 7. Lolich is one of only 22 major league pitchers to have struck out at least 2,800 batters in his career. He is of Croatian descent.

Ralph Terry

Ralph Willard Terry (born January 9, 1936) is an American former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. Terry is perhaps best known as the MVP of the 1962 World Series, and for giving up the walk-off home run to Bill Mazeroski that enabled the Pittsburgh Pirates to win the 1960 World Series.

Ray Knight

Charles Ray Knight (born December 28, 1952) is an American former right-handed Major League Baseball corner infielder best remembered for his time with the Cincinnati Reds and New York Mets. Originally drafted by the Cincinnati Reds in the tenth round of the 1970 Major League Baseball Draft, he is likely best remembered to Reds fans as the man who replaced Pete Rose at third base, whereas Mets fans remember Knight as the man who scored the winning run of game six of the 1986 World Series and the MVP of that series. He was most recently a studio analyst and occasional game analyst for the Mid-Atlantic Sports Network's coverage of the Washington Nationals from 2007 to 2018.

Rick Dempsey

John Rikard Dempsey (born September 13, 1949) is an American former professional baseball player. He played for 24 seasons as a catcher in Major League Baseball from 1969 to 1992, most notably for the Baltimore Orioles. Dempsey was known for being one of the best defensive catchers of his era.

Ron Cey

Ronald Charles Cey (; born February 15, 1948) is an American former professional baseball player, a third baseman in the major leagues. He played for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1971–82), Chicago Cubs (1983–86), and Oakland Athletics (1987). Cey batted and threw right-handed; a popular player, he was nicknamed "The Penguin" for his slow waddling running gait by his college coach, Chuck "Bobo" Brayton.

Salvador Pérez

Salvador Johan Pérez Diaz (born May 10, 1990) is a Venezuelan professional baseball catcher for the Kansas City Royals of Major League Baseball (MLB). He is a six-time MLB All-Star, five-time Gold Glove Award winner, and received the World Series Most Valuable Player Award when the Royals won the 2015 World Series over the New York Mets.

Scott Brosius

Scott David Brosius (born August 15, 1966) is an American former Major League Baseball third baseman for the Oakland Athletics (1991–1997) and the New York Yankees (1998–2001).

Whitey Ford

Edward Charles "Whitey" Ford (born October 21, 1928), nicknamed "The Chairman of the Board", is an American former professional baseball pitcher who played his entire 16-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career with the New York Yankees. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974.

Ford is a ten-time MLB All-Star and six-time World Series champion. In 1961 Ford won both the Cy Young Award and World Series Most Valuable Player Award. He led the American League in wins three times and in earned run average twice. The Yankees retired Ford's uniform number 16 in his honor.

In the wake of Yogi Berra's death in 2015, George Vecsey, writing in the New York Times, suggested that Ford is now "The Greatest Living Yankee."

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