World Fantasy Convention

The World Fantasy Convention is an annual convention of professionals, collectors, and others interested in the field of fantasy. The World Fantasy Awards are presented at the event.[1] Other features include an art show, a dealer's room, and an autograph reception.[2]

The convention was conceived and begun by T. E. D. Klein, Kirby McCauley and several others.

World Fantasy Convention
StatusActive
GenreFantasy, science fiction
FrequencyAnnually
CountryUnited States
Years active43
InauguratedOctober 31, 1975
Websitewww.worldfantasy.org

Previous conventions

Dates Location Info
October 31–
November 2, 1975
Holiday Inn
Providence, Rhode Island, USA[1][2] 
Theme for 1975 is "The Lovecraft Circle". Guest of Honor: Robert Bloch. Toastmaster: Gahan Wilson. Chaired by Kirby McCauley. Judges were Ramsey Campbell, Edward L. Ferman, David G. Hartwell, Fritz Leiber, and Gahan Wilson.
October 29–31, 1976 The Statler Hotel
New York, New York, USA
Theme for 1976 is "Unknown Worlds". Guests of Honor: C. L. Moore and Michael Moorcock.[3] Toastmaster: Gahan Wilson. Chaired by Thom Anderson. Judges were Charles Collins, Basil Copper, Gordon R. Dickson, Stuart David Schiff, and Gahan Wilson.
October 28–30, 1977 Los Angeles Biltmore
Los Angeles, California, USA
Theme for 1977 is "Clark Ashton Smith". Guest of Honor: Richard Matheson. Toastmaster: Gahan Wilson. Chaired by Dennis Rickard. Judges were Robert Bloch, David Drake, Harlan Ellison, Charles L. Grant, and Robert Weinberg.
October 13–15, 1978 Sheraton Fort Worth Hotel
Fort Worth, Texas, USA
Theme for 1978 is "Robert E. Howard". Guest of Honor: Fritz Leiber. Guest Artist: Alicia Austin. Toastmaster: Andrew Offutt. Chaired by Michael Templin. Judges were Charles N. Brown, Carl Jacobi, Stephen King, T. E. D. Klein, and Karl Edward Wagner.
October 12–14, 1979 Providence Biltmore
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Theme for 1979 is "Reunion". Guests of Honor: Stephen King and Frank Belknap Long.[4] Guest Artist: Michael Whelan. Toastmaster: Charles L. Grant. Chaired by Bob Booth. Judges were Poul Anderson, Terry Carr, Dennis Etchison, Elizabeth A. Lynn, and Roy A. Squires.[5]
October 31–
November 2, 1980
Marriott Hunt Valley Inn
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Theme for 1980 is "Edgar Allan Poe". Guest of Honor: Jack Vance. Guest Artist: Boris Vallejo. Toastmaster: Robert Bloch. Chaired by Chuck Miller and Tim Underwood. Judges were Stephen R. Donaldson, Frank Belknap Long, Andrew J. Offutt, Ted White, and Susan Wood.
October 30–
November 1, 1981
The Claremont Hotel
Berkeley, California, USA
Theme for 1981 is "Mark Twain, Jack London, Ambrose Bierce, Clark Ashton Smith". Guests of Honor: Alan Garner and Peter S. Beagle. Guest Artist: Brian Froud. Toastmaster: Karl Edward Wagner. Chaired by Jack Rems and Jeff Frane. Judges were Paul C. Allen, C. J. Cherryh, Gardner Dozois, Donald M. Grant, and Arthur W. Saha. (Alan Garner was unable to attend the convention.)
October 29–31, 1982 Park Plaza Hotel
New Haven, Connecticut, USA
Theme for 1982 is "Mark Twain". Guests of Honor: Peter Straub and Joseph Payne Brennan. Guest Artist: Don Maitz. Toastmaster: Charles L. Grant. Chaired by Norman Hood and Harold Kinney. Judges were Pat Cadigan, Virginia Kidd, Theodore Sturgeon, Douglas E. Winter, and Chelsea Quinn Yarbro.
October 28–30, 1983 Chicago Marriott O'Hare
Chicago, Illinois, USA
Theme for 1983 is "Sixty Years of Weird Tales". Guests of Honor: Gene Wolfe and Manly Wade Wellman. Guest Artist: Rowena Morrill. Toastmaster: Robert Bloch. Chaired by Robert Weinberg. Judges were Bob Booth, John Coyne, Sharon Jarvis, Alan Ryan, and Elizabeth Wollheim.
October 12–14, 1984 Westin Hotel
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Theme for 1984 is "Fantasy, An International Genre". Guests of Honor: Tanith Lee and Jane Yolen. Guest Artist: Jeff Jones. Toastmaster: Spider Robinson. Chaired by Rodger Turner and John Bell. Judges were Ellen Asher, Ginjer Buchanan, Les Daniels, Mimi Panitch, and George H. Scithers.
October 31–
November 3, 1985
Doubletree Hotel
Tucson, Arizona, USA
Theme for 1985 is "Fantasy Writers of the Southwest". Guest of Honor: Stephen R. Donaldson. Special Guest: Evangeline Walton. Guest Artist: Victoria Poyser. Toastperson: Chelsea Quinn Yarbro. Chaired by Randal Rau. Judges were Suzy McKee Charnas, Jo Fletcher, George R. R. Martin, Baird Searles, and Terri Windling.
October 29–
November 2, 1986
Providence Biltmore
Providence, Rhode Island, USA[6]
Theme for 1986 is "From 'New Writers' to 'Old Masters'". Guests of Honor: Ramsey Campbell and Charles L. Grant. Guest Artist: J. K. Potter. Toastmaster: Douglas E. Winter. Chaired by Robert Plante. Judges were Robert A. Collins, Ellen Datlow, Dean R. Koontz, Patricia A. McKillip, and Charles de Lint.
October 29–
November 1, 1987
Hyatt Regency Nashville
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Theme for 1987 is "A Southern Fantasy". Guest of Honor: Piers Anthony. Guest Artist: Frank Kelly Freas. Special Guests: Andre Norton, Karl Edward Wagner, plus Ron and Val Lakey Lindahn. Toastmaster: Charles L. Grant. Chaired by Maurine Dorris. Judges were John M. Ford, Paul Hazel, Tappan King, Michael McDowell, and Melissa Ann Singer.
October 28–31, 1988 Ramada Inn
London, England, UK
Theme for 1988 is "Gaslight & Ghosts". Combined with Fantasycon XIII. Guest of Honor: James Herbert. Artist Guest: Michael Foreman. Special Guest: Diana Wynne Jones. MC: Clive Barker. Chaired by Jo Fletcher and Stephen Jones. Judges were Mike Ashley, Scott Baker, Robert S. Hadji, Maxim Jakubowski, and Donald A. Wollheim
October 27–29, 1989 Seattle Sheraton
Seattle, Washington, USA
Theme for 1989 is "Roots of Fantasy: Myth, Folklore & Archetype". Honored Guests: Ursula K. Le Guin, Avram Davidson, S. P. Somtow, Robert R. McCammon, and Yoshitaka Amano. Toastmaster: Ginjer Buchanan. Chaired by Robert J. Doyle.
November 2–4, 1990 Hyatt Regency Hotel
Schaumburg, Illinois, USA
Theme for 1990 is "An H. P. Lovecraft Centenary Celebration". Guests of Honor: F. Paul Wilson, L. Sprague de Camp, and Susan Allison. Guest Artist: David B. Mattingly. Special Guests: Robert Bloch and Julius Schwartz. Toastmaster: Raymond E. Feist. Chaired by Robert Weinberg.
November 1–3, 1991 The Doubletree Hotel
Tucson, Arizona, USA
Theme for 1991 is "The Fantasy Heritage of the Spanish and Indian Cultures". Special Guests: Susan and Harlan Ellison. Artist Guest: Arlin Robins. Toastmaster: Stephen R. Donaldson. Chaired by Bruce Farr and Randal Rau.
October 29–
November 1, 1992
Callaway Gardens Resort
Pine Mountain, Georgia, USA
Theme for 1992 is "Grails: Quests, Visitations, and Other Occurrences". Guests of Honor: Michael Bishop, John Farris, Martin H. Greenberg, Anne McCaffrey, and Robert Gould. Chaired by Richard Gilliam and Edward E. Kramer.
October 28–31, 1993 Radisson South Hotel
Bloomington, Minnesota, USA
Theme for 1993 is "The Vocabulary of the Fantastic". Guests of Honor: Poul Anderson, John Crowley, and Roger Zelazny. Guest Artist: Thomas Canty (did not attend). Special Guest: Basil Copper. Toastmaster: Neil Gaiman. Chaired by Greg Ketter.
October 27–31, 1994 Clarion Hotel
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Theme for 1994 is "Obsessions in Fantasy and Gothic Horror". Honored Guests: Damon Knight, George Alec Effinger, George R. R. Martin, Tim Powers, and Kate Wilhelm. Artist Guest of Honor: Jill Bauman. Chaired by Tom Hanlon.
October 26–29, 1995 Inner Harbor Marriott
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Theme for 1995 is "Celebrating the Craft of Short Fiction in Fantasy and Horror". Writer Guests of Honor: Terry Bisson, Lucius Shepard, Howard Waldrop. Artist Guest of Honor: Rick Berry. Publisher Guest of Honor: Lloyd Arthur Eshbach. Toastmaster: Edward W. Bryant, Jr.. Chaired by Michael J. Walsh.
October 31–
November 3, 1996
Woodfield Hyatt Regency Hotel
Schaumburg, Illinois, USA
Theme for 1996 is "The Many Faces of Fantasy". Guests of Honor: Katherine Kurtz, Joe R. Lansdale, and Ellen Asher. Artist Guest of Honor: Ron Walotsky. Toastmaster: Brian Lumley. Chaired by Nancy Ford, Tina L. Jens, and Phyllis Weinberg.
October 30–
November 2, 1997
The International Hotel
London, England, UK
Theme for 1997 is "The Centenary of Dracula/The Hidden Realms of London". Combined with FantasyCon XXI. Guests of Honour: Iain Sinclair and Joan Aitkin. Artist Guest of Honour: Bob Eggleton. Special Guests: Hugh Cave and Ron Chetwynd Hayes. Special Media Guest: Doug Bradley. Master of Ceremonies: Robert Holdstock. Chaired by Jo Fletcher.
October 29–
November 1, 1998
Doubletree & Marriott Hotels
Monterey, California, USA
Theme for 1998 is "Golden Ages". Guest of Honor: Gahan Wilson. Special Guests: Cecelia Holland, Richard Laymon, and Frank M. Robinson. Toastmaster: Richard A. Lupoff. Chaired by Bryan Barrett and Linda McAllister. Website archive.
November 4–7, 1999 Rhode Island Convention Center
Westin and Biltmore Hotels
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
The 25th World Fantasy Convention. Guests of Honor: Charles de Lint, Leo & Diane Dillon, Patricia A. McKillip, and Robert Silverberg. Special Guest: Samuel R. Delany. Toastmaster: John M. Ford. Theme for 1999 is "Voyages". Chaired by Chip Hitchcock & Davey Snyder. Official website.
October 26–29, 2000 Omni Bayfront Hotel
Corpus Christi, Texas, USA[7]
Theme for 2000 is "El Dia de los Muertos (The Day of the Dead)". Guests of Honor: K.W. Jeter and John Crowley. Artist Guest of Honor: Charles Vess. Toastmaster: Joe R. Lansdale. Chaired by Fred Duarte. Judges were Suzi Baker, W. Paul Ganley, Tim Holman, Marvin Kaye, and Melissa Scott. Official website.
November 1–4, 2001 Delta Centre-Ville Hotel
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Theme for 2001 is "Je me souviens"/"I remember". Guests of Honor: Fred Saberhagen, Joel Champetier, and Donato Giancola. Toastmaster: Charles de Lint. Chaired by Bruce & Lea Farr. Official website.
October 31–
November 3, 2002
Minneapolis Hilton & Towers
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
Theme for 2002 is "Of Gods and Monsters". Guests of Honor: Dennis Etchison, Jonathan Carroll, Kathe Koja, Dave McKean, and Stephen Jones. Chaired by Greg Ketter. Website archive.
October 30–
November 2, 2003
Hyatt Regency Washington
Washington, D.C., USA
Theme for 2003 is "Dark Fantasy: Honorable Traditions". Author Guests of Honor: Brian Lumley and Jack Williamson. (Williamson was unable to attend.) Publisher Guest of Honor: W. Paul Ganley. Artist Guest of Honor: Allen Koszowski. Master of Ceremonies: Douglas E. Winter. Chaired by Michael J. Walsh. Official website
October 28–31, 2004 Tempe Mission Palms Hotel
Tempe, Arizona, USA
Theme for 2004 is "Women in Fantasy and Horror". Author Guest of Honour: Gwyneth Jones. Artist Guest of Honor: Janny Wurts. Editor Guest of Honor: Ellen Datlow. Publisher Guest of Honor: Betty Ballantine. Toastmistress: Jennifer Roberson. Chaired by Mike Willmoth with vice-chair Larry Vela. Official website
November 3–6, 2005 The Madison Concourse
Hotel & Governor's Club
Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Theme for 2005 is "The Architecture of Fantasy & Horror". Guests of Honor: Graham Joyce, Robert Weinberg, Terri Windling. Artist Guest of Honor: Kinuko Y. Craft. Toastmaster: Peter Straub. Special Recognition: Arkham House. Chaired by Meg Turville-Heitz. Official website
November 2–5, 2006 Renaissance Hotel
Austin, Texas, USA
Theme for 2006 is "Robert E. Howard Centennial". Published Cross Plains Universe celebrating Robert E. Howard. Guests of Honor: Glen Cook, Dave Duncan, Robin Hobb. Toastermater: Bradley Denton, Editor Guest of Honor: Glenn Lord. Artist Guest of Honor: John Jude Palencar. Robert E. Howard Artist Guest: Gary Gianni. Chaired by Renee Babcock and Fred Duarte. Official website
November 1–4, 2007 Saratoga City Center
Saratoga Springs, New York, USA
Theme for 2007 is "Ghosts and Revenants". Guests of Honor: Carol Emshwiller, Kim Newman, Lisa Tuttle. Artist Guest of Honor: Jean Giraud (Moebius). Special Guests: Joseph Bruchac, Barbara Roden, Christopher Roden, and George Scithers. Master of Ceremonies: Guy Gavriel Kay. Chaired by Joseph T. Berlant. Official website
October 30–
November 2, 2008
Hyatt Regency Calgary
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Theme for 2008 is "Mystery in Fantasy and Horror". Guests of Honor: David Morrell, Barbara Hambly, Tom Doherty. Artist Guest of Honor: Todd Lockwood. Toastmaster: Tad Williams. Chaired by Randy McCharles with vice-chair Kristiina Anderson. Website archive
October 29–
November 1, 2009
Fairmont San Jose Hotel
San Jose, California, USA
Theme for 2009 is "Celebrating Edgar Allan Poe's 200th Birthday". Guests of Honor: Garth Nix, Lisa Snellings, Michael Swanwick, Ann VanderMeer, Jeff VanderMeer, Zoran Živković, Donald Sidney-Fryer, and Richard A. Lupoff. Toastmaster: Jay Lake. Chaired by David Gallaher with vice-chair Rina Weisman. Official website
October 28–31, 2010 Hyatt Regency Columbus
Columbus, Ohio, USA
Theme for 2010 is "the Whimsical Side of Fantasy". Guests of Honor: Dennis McKiernan, Esther Friesner, David Hartwell, and Darrell K. Sweet. Chaired by Larry Smith and Sally Kobee. Official website
October 27–30, 2011 Town and Country
Resort and Convention Center
San Diego, California, USA
Theme for 2011 is "Sailing the Seas of Imagination". Guests of Honor: Jo Fletcher, Neil Gaiman, Parke Godwin, Shawna McCarthy, and Ruth Sanderson. Toastmaster: Connie Willis. Chaired by Val Ontell. Official website
November 1–4, 2012 Sheraton Parkway Toronto North
Toronto, Canada
Theme for 2012 is "Northern Gothic and Urban Fantasy". Guests of Honor: Elizabeth Hand, John Clute, Richard A. Kirk, and Charles de Lint. Toastmaster: Gary K. Wolfe. Chaired by Peter Halasz. Official website
October 31–
November 3, 2013
Hilton Brighton Metropole
Brighton, UK
Theme for 2013 is "Arthur Machen @ 150". Dedicated to the memory of Richard Matheson. Guests of Honour: Joanne Harris, Joe Hill, Richard Christian Matheson, Alan Lee, and Brian Aldiss. Master of Ceremonies: China Mieville. Co-Chairs: Amanda Foubister, Stephen Jones, Michael Marshall Smith. Official website
November 6–9, 2014 Hyatt Regency Crystal City 
Arlington County, Virginia, USA
The theme is 1914, a time of transition, a commemoration of the births of the artist Virgil Finlay and the author Robert Aickman, as well as the beginning of World War I. Guests of Honor: Guy Gavriel Kay, Les Edwards, Stuart David Schiff, Lail Finlay. Toastmaster: Mary Robinette Kowal Co-Chairs: Peggy Rae Sapienza & Michael J. Walsh. (Jane Yolen was originally slated to be Toastmaster but was forced to cancel her appearance due to medical issues.)[8] Official website
November 5–8, 2015 Saratoga City Center and Saratoga Hilton
Saratoga Springs, New York, USA
The theme is epic fantasy. Guests of Honor: Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, Steven Erikson. Toastmaster: Graham Joyce, Special Guests: David Drake and Glen Cook.[9] Chair: Joseph Berlant Official website
October 27–30, 2016 Greater Columbus Convention Center and
the Hyatt Regency Columbus
Columbus, Ohio, USA
The theme: “Flights of Fantasy.” [10] Official website
November 2–5, 2017 Wyndham Riverwalk
San Antonio, Texas, USA
The theme was "Secret Histories." Guests of Honor: Tananarive Due, Karen Joy Fowler, Gregory Manchess, David Mitchell, Toastmaster: Martha Wells Official website
November 1–4, 2018 Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Official Website

Upcoming conventions

Dates Location Info
October 31 – November 3, 2019 Marriott Los Angeles Airport Hotel
Los Angeles, California, USA
Guest of Honor: Tad Williams. Special Guest of Honor: Margo Lanagan. Special Guest: Beth Meacham. Toastmaster: Robert Silverberg. Official Website
October 29 – November 1, 2020 Little America Hotel
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Author Guest of Honor: Stephen Gallagher. Artist Guest of Honor: David Cherry. Editor Guest of Honor: Anne Groell. Author Special Guest: Stephen Graham Jones. Toastmasters Tracy and Laura Hickman. Official Website

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Writers Of Horror Stories Get Together". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. United Press International. November 2, 1975. Retrieved March 30, 2010.
  2. ^ a b "Supernatural convention set". Bangor Daily News. United Press International. October 9, 1975. Retrieved March 30, 2010.
  3. ^ "World Fantasy Convention". Checkpoint.ansible.co.uk. December 1976.
  4. ^ Beahm, George (September 1, 1998). Stephen King from A to Z: An Encyclopedia of His Life and Work. Andrews McMeel Publishing. p. 7. ISBN 0-8362-6914-4. Retrieved August 26, 2014.
  5. ^ "Awards". Science Fiction Fantasy Book Review. 1 (10). November 1979. Retrieved August 26, 2014.
  6. ^ Krieger, Elliott (November 3, 1986). "Providence hosts hounds of horror". Providence Journal. Retrieved March 30, 2010.
  7. ^ Tedesco, John (October 29, 2000). "Fantasy gathering attracts hundreds". San Antonio Express-News. p. 3B.
  8. ^ "Progress Report Four" (PDF). World Fantasy 2014. July 12, 2014. Retrieved August 26, 2014.
  9. ^ "World Fantasy 2015 Guests of Honor". Locus Online. November 4, 2013. Retrieved August 26, 2014.
  10. ^ "World Fantasy 2016". Locus Online. June 5, 2016. Retrieved Nov 11, 2015.

External links

Dennis Etchison

Dennis William Etchison (born March 30, 1943) is an American writer and editor of fantasy and horror fiction. Etchison refers to his own work as "rather dark, depressing, almost pathologically inward fiction about the individual in relation to the world". Stephen King has called Dennis Etchison "one hell of a fiction writer" and he has been called "the most original living horror writer in America" (The Viking-Penguin Encyclopedia of Horror and the Supernatural). While he has achieved some acclaim as a novelist, it is his work in the short story format that is especially well-regarded by critics and genre fans. He was President of Horror Writers Association from 1992 to 1994. He is a multi-award winner, having won the British Fantasy Award three times for fiction, and the World Fantasy Award for anthologies he edited.

Donald M. Grant

Donald Metcalf Grant (April 3, 1927 – August 19, 2009) was an American publisher.

Fantasy Magazine

Fantasy Magazine was an American online fantasy and science fiction magazine. It was launched as a print edition at the 2005 World Fantasy Convention in Madison, Wisconsin. It continued in this format for six more issues, but in mid-October 2007, it moved online, with daily content, and spun off an original anthology, titled Fantasy. The magazine has published, in the past, stories by Peter S. Beagle, Jeffrey Ford, Theodora Goss, Caitlin Kiernan, Joe R. Lansdale, Nick Mamatas, Tim Pratt, Cat Rambo, Ekaterina Sedia, Catherynne M. Valente, Jeff VanderMeer, and more.

As of January 2012, Fantasy was merged into its sister Lightspeed, and John Joseph Adams replaced Sean Wallace as publisher.

Gahan Wilson

Gahan Wilson (born February 18, 1930) is an American author, cartoonist and illustrator known for his cartoons depicting horror-fantasy situations.

Wilson was born in Evanston, Illinois. He has been married to author Nancy Winters (née Nancy Dee Midyette) since 1966.

International Horror Guild Award

The International Horror Guild Award (also known as the IHG Award) was an accolade recognizing excellence in the field of horror/dark fantasy, presented by the International Horror Guild (IHG) from 1995 to 2008.The IHG Awards were determined by a jury of notable horror/dark fantasy critics and reviewers, which has included Edward Bryant, Ann VanderMeer, Stefan Dziemianowicz, William Sheehan, Fiona Webster and Hank Wagner. Nomination suggestions were accepted from the public. The annual awards were usually announced during a special presentation at a convention or other event, and IHG Award presentations have been held at the World Fantasy Convention, the World Horror Convention and Dragon*Con.Originally in the form of a "winged dog gargoyle" figure on a base, in 2002 the IHG Award was redesigned as a black, tombstone-shaped and free-standing plaque. The Living Legend Award had the same design, but in clear acrylic.

Kirby McCauley

Kirby McCauley (September 11, 1941 – August 30, 2014) was an American literary agent and editor based in New York City.

He attended the University of Minnesota and became a literary agent in the 1970s, soon building a successful agency and representing authors such as Stephen King, Roger Zelazny, and George R.R. Martin, who credits him with helping to launch his writing career.When King decided in the late 1970s and 1980s to publish some of his novels under the pen name Richard Bachman, McCauley provided him with a fake author picture that actually showed his own insurance agent, Richard Manuel.

In 1975, McCauley chaired the first World Fantasy Convention, an event he conceived with T. E. D. Klein and several others.

His works include the landmark 1980 horror anthology Dark Forces, and other anthologies such as Frights, Frights 2, and Night Chills.

He died of renal failure associated with long-term diabetes in August 2014.

Splatterpunk

Splatterpunk was a movement within horror fiction in the 1980s, distinguished by its graphic, often gory, depiction of violence, countercultural alignment and "hyperintensive horror with no limits." The term was coined in 1986 by David J. Schow at the Twelfth World Fantasy Convention in Providence, Rhode Island. Splatterpunk is regarded as a revolt against the "traditional, meekly suggestive horror story".

Splatterpunk has been defined as a "literary genre characterised by graphically described scenes of an extremely gory nature."Michael Shea's short fiction "The Autopsy" (1980) has been described as a "proto-splatterpunk" story.Splatterpunk provoked considerable controversy among horror writers. Robert Bloch criticised the movement, stating "there is a distinction to be made between that which inspires terror and that which inspires nausea". William F. Nolan and Charles L. Grant also censured the movement. However, critics R.S. Hadji and Philip Nutman praised the movement, the latter stating splatterpunk was a "survivalist" literature that "reflects the moral chaos of our times".Though the term gained some prominence in the 1980s and 1990s, and, as a movement, attracted a cult following, the term "splatterpunk" has since been replaced by other synonymous terms for the genre. The last major commercial endeavor aimed at the Splatterpunk audience was 1995's Splatterpunks II: Over the Edge, an anthology of short stories which also included essays on horror cinema and an interview with Anton LaVey. By 1998, one commentator was stating that interest in splatterpunk was declining, noting such interest "seemed to have reached a peak" in the mid-1990s. The term is still sometimes used for horror with a strong gruesome element, such as Philip Nutman's novel Cities of Night.Writers known for writing in this genre include Clive Barker, Poppy Z. Brite, Jack Ketchum, Richard Laymon, J. F. Gonzalez, Joe Lansdale, Brian Keene, Monica J. O'Rourke, Matt Shaw, Bryan Smith, Richard Christian Matheson, Robert McCammon, Shane McKenzie, Wrath James White, David J. Schow

(described as "the father of splatterpunk" by Richard Christian Matheson), John Skipp, Craig Spector, Edward Lee, and Michael Boatman. Some commentators also

regard Kathe Koja as a splatterpunk writer.

Tom Doherty

Tom Doherty (born April 23, 1935) is an American publisher, and the founder of science fiction and fantasy book publisher Tor Books. After working as a book salesman in the 1950s and 1960s, Doherty became publisher of Tempo Books in 1972; in 1975, he became, in addition, publisher of another company also owned by Grosset & Dunlap, the science fiction imprint Ace Books. In 1980 he left Ace to found his own company, Tor Books.

Tor became a subsidiary of St. Martin's Press in 1987; both are now subsidiaries of Holtzbrinck Publishers, ultimately owned by the Macmillan Publishers. Doherty continues as president and publisher of Tom Doherty Associates, LLC, publishing under the Tor, Forge, Orb, Starscape, and Tor Teen imprints.

In 2005, Doherty was awarded a World Fantasy Award in the "Lifetime Achievement" category at the World Fantasy Convention for his contributions to the fantasy field.

World Fantasy Award

The World Fantasy Awards are a set of awards given each year for the best fantasy fiction published during the previous calendar year. Organized and overseen by the World Fantasy Convention, the awards are given each year at the eponymous annual convention as the central focus of the event. They were first given in 1975, at the first World Fantasy Convention, and have been awarded annually since. Over the years that the award has been given, the categories presented have changed; currently World Fantasy Awards are given in five written categories, one category for artists, and four special categories for individuals to honor their general work in the field of fantasy.

The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees of the convention and a panel of judges, typically made up of fantasy authors. Winners receive a small trophy; through the 2015 awards it was a bust of H. P. Lovecraft designed by cartoonist Gahan Wilson. The bust was retired following that year amid complaints about Lovecraft's history of racism; a new statuette designed by Vincent Villafranca depicting a tree in front of a full moon was released in 2017. The 2018 awards were presented at the 44th World Fantasy Convention in Baltimore, Maryland, on November 4, 2018, and the 2019 awards will be presented at the 45th World Fantasy Convention in Los Angeles, California, on November 3, 2019.

World Fantasy Award—Anthology

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction published in English during the previous calendar year. The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Anthology is given each year for anthologies of fantasy stories by multiple authors published in English. An anthology can have any number of editors, and works in the anthology may have been previously published; awards are also given out for collections of works by a single author in the Collection category. The Anthology category has been awarded annually since 1988, though from 1977 through 1987 anthologies were admissible as nominees in the Collection category. During the ten years they were admissible for that category they won the award seven times and represented 38 of the 56 nominations.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 31 nomination years, 114 editors have had works nominated; 36 of them have won, including co-editors. Only four editors have won more than once. Ellen Datlow has won 8 times out of 34 nominations, the most of any editor; Terri Windling has won 6 times out of 18 nominations, all of the nominations as a co-editor with Datlow; Jack Dann has won twice out of five nominations; and Dennis Etchison has won twice out of 3 nominations. After Datlow and Windling, the editors with the most nominations are Stephen Jones, who has won once out of fourteen nominations, Gardner Dozois, who has won once out of six nominations, and David Sutton and Martin H. Greenberg, who each have been nominated six times without winning. Fifteen editors in total have been nominated more than twice.

World Fantasy Award—Artist

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction and art published during the preceding calendar year. The awards have been described by sources such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most renowned speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Artist is given each year to artists of works related to fantasy released in the preceding calendar year. Fantasy artists are also eligible for the Special Award—Professional category. The Artist category has been awarded annually since 1975.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 91 artists have been nominated; 38 of them have won, including ties. Three artists have won three times: Shaun Tan, out of four nominations; Charles Vess, out of five; and Michael Whelan, out of nine. Four other artists have won twice: Thomas Canty, out of nine nominations; Lee Brown Coye, both times he was nominated; Edward Gorey, out of four; and J. K. Potter, out of ten. No other artists have won more than once. Potter and John Picacio have received the most nominations at ten, followed by Canty, Don Maitz, and Whelan at nine each. Stephen Fabian and John Jude Palencar are tied at eight for the most nominations without winning.

World Fantasy Award—Collection

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction published in English during the previous calendar year. The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Collection is given each year for collections of fantasy stories by a single author published in English. A collection can have any number of editors, and works in the collection may have been previously published; awards are also given out for anthologies of works by multiple authors in the Anthology category. The Collection category has been awarded annually since 1975, though from 1977 through 1987 anthologies were admissible as nominees. Anthologies were split into a separate category beginning in 1988; during the 10 years they were admissible they won the award 7 times and were 38 of the 56 nominations.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 152 writers have had works nominated; 41 of them have won, including ties and co-authors. Only six writers or editors have won more than once. Jeffrey Ford has won the regular collection award three times out of four nominations, while Karen Joy Fowler, Lucius Shepard, and Gene Wolfe won the regular collection award twice, out of two, four, and two nominations, respectively. Charles L. Grant and Kirby McCauley won the award as editors of anthologies while those were eligible; Grant was nominated nine times as an editor and once for a collection, while McCauley won both times he was nominated for anthologies. Grant's ten nominations are the most of any writer or editor, followed by Ramsey Campbell, Harlan Ellison, and Charles de Lint at five, with two of Campbell's nominations coming for anthologies. Dennis Etchison, Stephen King, Fritz Leiber, Kelly Link, and Stuart David Schiff have had the most nominations without winning at four; one of Etchison's and all of Schiff's nominations were for anthologies.

World Fantasy Award—Life Achievement

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction and fantasy art published in English during the preceding calendar year. The awards have been described by sources such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and as one of the three most renowned speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Life Achievement is given each year to individuals for their overall career in fields related to fantasy. These have included, for example, authors, editors, and publishers. The specific nomination reasons are not given, and nominees are not required to have retired, though they can only win once. The Life Achievement category has been awarded annually since 1975.World Fantasy Award nominees are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner of each category. Unlike the other World Fantasy Award categories, the nominees for the Life Achievement award are not announced; instead, the winner is announced along with the nominees in the other categories. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors, and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Through 2015, winners were presented with a statuette of H. P. Lovecraft; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 69 people have been given the Life Achievement Award. Multiple winners have been awarded 21 times, typically two co-winners, though five were noted in 1984. Since 2000 it has become an unofficial tradition for two winners to be announced, often with one winner primarily an author and the other not. While most winners have been authors and editors, five winners have been primarily artists of fantasy art and book covers, and four winners are best known for founding or running publishing houses that produce fantasy works.

World Fantasy Award—Long Fiction

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction published in English during the previous calendar year. The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Long Fiction is given each year for fantasy stories published in English. A work of fiction is eligible for the category if it is between 10,000 and 40,000 words in length; awards are also given out for longer pieces in the Novel category and shorter lengths in the Short Fiction category. The Long Fiction category has been awarded annually since 1982, though between 1975—when the World Fantasy Awards were instated—and 1982 the short fiction category covered works of up to 40,000 words. In 2016, the name of the category was changed from Best Novella to Long Fiction.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 37 nomination years, 131 authors have had works nominated; 37 of them have won, including ties and co-authors. Only four authors have won more than once: Elizabeth Hand, with three wins out of eight nominations; Richard Bowes, with two wins out of three nominations; K. J. Parker, who also won twice out of three nominations; and Ellen Klages, with two wins out of two nominations. Of authors who have won at least once, Hand has the most nominations, followed by George R. R. Martin at five and Ursula K. Le Guin at four. Lucius Shepard has the most nominations without winning and the most overall at ten; he is followed by Kim Newman, who has six nominations without winning.

World Fantasy Award—Novel

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction published in English during the previous calendar year. The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Novel is given each year for fantasy novels published in English or translated into English. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as a novel if it is 40,000 words or longer; awards are also given out for pieces of shorter lengths in the Short Fiction and Long Fiction categories. The Novel category has been awarded annually since 1975.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 154 authors have had works nominated; 45 of them have won, including ties. Five authors have won twice: Gene Wolfe, out of eight nominations; Tim Powers, out of five; Patricia McKillip, out of four; Jeffrey Ford, out of three; and James K. Morrow for both of his nominations. Wolfe has the most nominations for an author who has won at least once, while Stephen King has the most nominations without winning, at nine, followed by Charles L. Grant at six and Jonathan Carroll at five.

World Fantasy Award—Short Fiction

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction published in English during the previous calendar year. The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Short Fiction is given each year for fantasy short stories published in English. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as short fiction if it is 10,000 words or less in length; awards are also given out for longer pieces in the Novel and Long Fiction categories. The Short Fiction category has been awarded annually since 1975, though before 1982—when the category was instated—it was named "Best Short Fiction" and covered works of up to 40,000 words. It was then renamed "Best Short Story" until 2016, when it was renamed to the "Short Fiction" category.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 160 authors have had works nominated; 44 of them have won, including ties and co-authors. Only five authors have won more than once: Ramsey Campbell and James Blaylock with two wins out of four nominations each, Stephen King won two out of three, and Tanith Lee and Fred Chappell won both times they were nominated. Of authors who have won at least once, Jeffrey Ford and Kelly Link have the most nominations at five, followed by Dennis Etchison and Avram Davidson, who along with Campbell and Blaylock received four nominations. Charles de Lint has the most nominations without winning at five; he is followed by Michael Swanwick, who has had four nominations without winning.

World Fantasy Convention Award

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction published in English during the previous calendar year. The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Convention Award is a special award given in some years for "peerless contributions to the fantasy genre". These have included authors, editors, and publishers. Other, annually-presented special awards are given out for professional or non-professional work in the prior year in the Special Award—Professional and Special Award—Non-professional categories. A Life Achievement award is also given annually. The World Fantasy Convention Award was first presented in 1978; it was awarded annually through 1987 and again in 1997 and 2013. It has not been awarded since, though it is still listed as an official category.Most World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges of the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. Unlike the other World Fantasy Award categories, the Convention Award has no nominees and is not decided in the usual way; instead, the winner is selected by the convention organizers themselves and announced along with the nominees in the other categories. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Through 2015, winners were presented with a statuette of H. P. Lovecraft; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.Thirteen people and one publishing house have been given the Convention Award. Seven of the winners are primarily known for their writing, as opposed to editing work or artwork. Six of the winners have gone on to be awarded the Lifetime Achievement award, sometimes only a few years after they were given a Convention Award: Evangeline Walton four years later in 1989, Andre Norton eleven years later in 1998, Hugh B. Cave two years later in 1999, Donald M. Grant nineteen years later in 2003, and Stephen King and Gahan Wilson, twenty-four and twenty-three years later in 2004.

World Fantasy Special Award—Non-professional

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction and art published in English during the preceding calendar year. The awards have been described by sources such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and as one of the three most renowned speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Special Award—Non-professional is given each year to individuals for their non-professional work in the preceding calendar year in fields related to fantasy that are not covered by other World Fantasy Award categories. These have included editors of magazines and novels, publishers, and authors of non-fiction works. Occasionally some publishing companies have been nominated along with individual editors and publishers. The nomination reasons have sometimes not been specified beyond "contributions to the genre". Individuals are also eligible for the Special Award—Professional category for their professional work. The World Fantasy Special Award—Non-professional has been awarded annually since 1975.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Through 2015, winners were presented with a statuette of H. P. Lovecraft; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 250 individuals and 3 organizations have been nominated; 51 people and 2 organizations have won, including ties and co-nominees. The organizations that have been nominated are: The British Fantasy Society, with one winning nomination; The Friends of Arthur Machen, with one unsuccessful nomination; and Fedogan & Bremer, with one win out of three nominations. Stuart David Schiff has received the most awards at four wins out of six nominations, for his work at Whispers magazine and Whispers Press. R. B. Russell has won four times out of nine nominations, and Rosalie Parker four out of seven, for their work at Tartarus Press. Three other individuals have won twice: Paul C. Allen out of three nominations for Fantasy Newsletter, Richard Chizmar out of seven for Cemetery Dance and Cemetery Dance Publications, and W. Paul Ganley out of ten for Weirdbook and Weirdbook Press. Ganley's ten nominations are the most of anyone, followed by Stephen Jones with nine, winning once, for Fantasy Tales and other work, and David Sutton with one win out of seven nominations for Fantasy Tales. They are followed by Scott H. Andrews with six for his work at Beneath Ceaseless Skies, the most nominations without winning.

World Fantasy Special Award—Professional

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction and art published in English during the preceding calendar year. The awards have been described by sources such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most renowned speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Special Award—Professional is given each year to individuals for their professional work in the preceding calendar year in fields related to fantasy that is not covered by other World Fantasy Award categories. These have included editors of magazines and novels, publishers, and authors of non-fiction works. Occasionally, especially in the first few years of the award, some publishing companies were nominated along with individual editors and publishers. The nomination reasons were not specified in the first year of the award, and have sometimes not been specified beyond "contributions to the genre". Individuals are also eligible for the Special Award—Non-professional category for their non-professional work. The World Fantasy Special Award—Professional has been awarded annually since 1975.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 145 individuals and four publishing companies have been nominated; 53 people have won, including ties and co-nominees. For his work at Donald M. Grant, Publisher Donald M. Grant has won three times out of eight nominations, and six other nominees have won twice. Ian Ballantine and Betty Ballantine have won twice out of two nominations each for their non-fiction and publishing work, and Peter Crowther twice out of four nominations for his work at PS Publishing. Edward L. Ferman won twice out of six nominations for his work at The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Stephen Jones twice out of six for his editing and anthology work, and Gordon Van Gelder twice out of seven nominations for his editing work in both books and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Ellen Datlow has received the most nominations with ten, winning once, for her editing and anthology work, and David Pringle has the most nominations without winning with five, for his work at Interzone and for "contributions to the genre".

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