World Fantasy Award

The World Fantasy Awards are a set of awards given each year for the best fantasy fiction published during the previous calendar year. Organized and overseen by the World Fantasy Convention, the awards are given each year at the eponymous annual convention as the central focus of the event. They were first given in 1975, at the first World Fantasy Convention, and have been awarded annually since. Over the years that the award has been given, the categories presented have changed; currently World Fantasy Awards are given in five written categories, one category for artists, and four special categories for individuals to honor their general work in the field of fantasy.

The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize",[1] and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees of the convention and a panel of judges, typically made up of fantasy authors. Winners receive a small trophy; through the 2015 awards it was a bust of H. P. Lovecraft designed by cartoonist Gahan Wilson. The bust was retired following that year amid complaints about Lovecraft's history of racism; a new statuette designed by Vincent Villafranca depicting a tree in front of a full moon was released in 2017. The 2018 awards were presented at the 44th World Fantasy Convention in Baltimore, Maryland, on November 4, 2018, and the 2019 awards will be presented at the 45th World Fantasy Convention in Los Angeles, California, on November 3, 2019.

World Fantasy Award
World Fantasy Award tree.jpeg
Statuette used as award trophy since 2016
Awarded forBest fantasy works of the previous year
CountryInternational
Presented byWorld Fantasy Convention
First awarded1975
Websiteworldfantasy.org

History

World Fantasy Award bust
Bust of H. P. Lovecraft used as award trophy from inception through 2015

The World Fantasy Awards were established at the first World Fantasy Convention, an annual convention of professionals, collectors, and others interested in the field of fantasy, held that first year in horror writer H. P. Lovecraft's home city of Providence, Rhode Island in 1975. Winners were presented with a trophy in the form of a bust of an elongated caricature of Lovecraft designed by cartoonist Gahan Wilson, nicknamed the "Howard", which matched the theme of the first convention, "The Lovecraft Circle".[2] As stated by Wilson in First World Fantasy Awards: An Anthology of the Fantastic, "The point of the awards was, is, and hopefully shall be to give a visible, potentially usable, sign of appreciation to writers working in the area of fantastic literature, an area too often distinguished by low financial remuneration and indifference".[3]

At the start of the awards in 1975, seven categories were presented: Best Novel, Best Short Fiction, Best Collection, Best Artist, Special Award—Professional, Special Award—Non-professional, and Life Achievement. Only a few categories have changed since then, and no changes have been made to the rules. 1978 saw the addition of the Convention Award, a special award given for general contributions to the genre, and the only award not given every year since the beginning. The Short Fiction award was split into Short Story and Novella awards in 1982, and in 1988 the multi-author anthologies, previously eligible for the Collection award, were split into their own Best Anthology category. No changes have been made since.[4]

Winners were presented with the H. P. Lovecraft bust through the 2015 awards; at that ceremony the presenters announced that future ceremonies will no longer use the trophy. Although controversy had arisen in recent years over Lovecraft's history of racism, no explicit reason was given for the change.[5] A new statuette, designed by Vincent Villafranca, was announced in April 2017 to be used for the 2016 awards on. The new award, which depicts a tree in front of a full moon, was intended to evoke the use of trees and night imagery in mythology, fantasy, and horror works.[6]

Administration

World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by judges and attendees of the World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, with the two most-nominated selected, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner.[4][7] The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors, as well as other fantasy professionals[8] and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties if the judges are deadlocked.[4] The awards administration is a subgroup of the World Fantasy Convention Board, which selects sites for upcoming World Fantasy Conventions. Both the board and the judges panel are largely made up of professionals in the field of fantasy.[9] The judges for the 2014 awards, for example, were authors Andy Duncan, Kij Johnson, Oliver Johnson, and Liz Williams, and editor John Klima.[10]

The nominees are announced in July, and final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention around the end of October. The Life Achievement and Convention Awards do not list nominees, and instead have the winner announced along with the other categories' nominees.[7] The Life Achievement winner is decided by the judges panel, while the Convention award winner, not given every year, is selected by the convention organizers.[11] The World Fantasy Convention itself is a multi-day event with several hundred attendees taking place in a different city each year, usually in the United States but sometimes in Canada or the United Kingdom. In addition to the awards ceremony, the conventions include an art show, a dealer's room, autograph receptions, and numerous panels and discussions.[11][12]

Categories

The World Fantasy Awards are split into ten categories, including both awards for written works and for professionals in the field. Eligibility requirements are loosely defined: works must have been published in the prior calendar year, and professionals must still be living. All types of fantasy works are accepted, regardless of subgenre or style, though whether a given work is considered to be fantasy is left up to the discretion of the nominators and judges.[7]

Across all categories, Ellen Datlow has both the most nominations and most wins of any nominee, with 10 wins out of 42 nominations, primarily for her anthologies. She is followed by Terri Windling with 9 out of 30 and Stephen Jones with 3 out of 28, both also mainly for editing anthologies. Jeffrey Ford has the highest number of wins after Datlow and Windling with 6 out of 14 nominations, and is tied for the highest number of fiction awards with Stephen King at four.[13]

Current categories Year started Current description
Best Novel 1975 Stories of 40,000 words or more
Best Novella 1982 Stories of between 10,000 and 40,000 words
Best Short Story 1975 Stories of less than 10,000 words
Best Collection 1975 Collections of stories by a single author
Best Anthology 1988 Anthologies of stories by multiple authors
Best Artist 1975 Artists
Special Award—Professional 1975 Professionals in the field of fantasy
Special Award—Non-professional 1975 Non-professionals in the field of fantasy
Convention Award 1978 Peerless contributions to the fantasy genre
Life Achievement 1975 Outstanding service to the fantasy field

Recognition

The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize",[1] and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction).[14][15] In 2010 multiple winner George R. R. Martin described winning the Hugo, Nebula, and "the prestigious World Fantasy Award" as the "triple crown".[16] Others have also noted the award's prestige in the field, such as Tachyon Publications and 2014 Best Anthology winner Gardner Dozois.[17][18] Stephen Jones of the Best New Horror series has said that winning the anthology award for their first volume in 1991 helped "establish the series among readers and some publishers" in multiple countries.[19] Winners such as Nnedi Okorafor—Best Novel in 2011—have described the award as "one of my greatest honors as a writer".[20] Editor and bookseller Rick Klaw in 2007, however, noted that the consensus at the time "in the bookselling community" was that winning the novel category did not have any effect on sales and did not help keep the book in print, with 57 percent of prior winners out of print, compared to 23 percent of Hugo Award winners from the same time period.[21]

Two anthologies have been drawn from the World Fantasy Award winners: First World Fantasy Awards: An Anthology of the Fantastic in 1977, edited by Gahan Wilson and covering stories from the initial award year, and The World Fantasy Awards: Volume Two in 1980, edited by Stuart David Schiff and Fritz Leiber.[22][23]

Controversies

Graphic novels

At the 1991 awards, graphic novel The Sandman issue #19 "A Midsummer Night's Dream", scripted by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Charles Vess, won the award for Best Short Story.[24] A common rumor afterwards was that the rules were subsequently changed to prevent another graphic novel from winning.[15] The awards administration later clarified that comics and graphic novels were not intended to be eligible for that category, which did not require a rule change: "Comics are eligible in the Special Award Professional category. We never made a change in the rules."[7] No person has won or been nominated for the Special Award Professional category for their work on a comic or graphic novel either before or since the controversy.[25]

H. P. Lovecraft bust

A minor controversy about the trophy occurred in 1984, when Donald Wandrei refused his Life Achievement award as he felt the award bust was a demeaning caricature of Lovecraft, whom he had known personally. Wandrei's rejected trophy was later recycled and given to another award winner.[26][27]

A larger controversy surrounding the bust began in the 2010s, when several authors began to object to using the author H. P. Lovecraft as the symbol of the awards, given his outspoken racism, though others such as Lovecraft biographer S. T. Joshi claimed that Lovecraft's attitudes were not considered extreme at the time.[20][28] Winners Okorafor and China Miéville noted in 2011 that they disliked being honored by a bust of a man who would have found many of the winners and nominees distasteful because of their race.[20] Several authors and editors argued for the trophy to be changed, including a petition by author Daniel José Older in 2014,[1] an editorial by The New York Review of Science Fiction editor Kevin J. Maroney arguing that it should be changed "as a courtesy to generations of writers whom the WFA hopes to honor",[29] and 2014 Best Novel winner Sofia Samatar's acceptance speech.[5]

In September 2014, the administrators of the World Fantasy Award announced they were "in discussion" about the future of the award trophy.[1] In November 2015, at the 2015 awards, they announced that the Lovecraft bust would no longer be used beginning the following year.[5] Lenika Cruz, associate editor of The Atlantic, defended the decision, stating that "Lovecraft's removal is about more than just the writer himself; it's not an indictment of his entire oeuvre".[2] Lovecraft scholar S. T. Joshi, however, expressed anger at the decision, and returned his two World Fantasy Awards and urged a boycott of the convention.[30]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Flood, Alison (2014-09-17). "World Fantasy awards pressed to drop HP Lovecraft trophy in racism row". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2015-01-18. Retrieved 2015-01-30.
  2. ^ a b Cruz, Lenika (2015-11-12). "'Political Correctness' Won't Ruin H.P. Lovecraft's Legacy". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on 2015-11-17. Retrieved 2015-12-03.
  3. ^ Wilson, Gahan, ed. (1977). First World Fantasy Awards: An Anthology of the Fantastic. Doubleday. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-385-12199-6.
  4. ^ a b c "World Fantasy Awards". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-09-28. Retrieved 2013-09-23.
  5. ^ a b c Flood, Alison (2015-11-09). "World Fantasy award drops HP Lovecraft as prize image". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2015-11-18. Retrieved 2015-11-20.
  6. ^ "World Fantasy Awards Administration Awards Announcement". World Fantasy Convention Board. 2017-04-13. Retrieved 2017-04-13.
  7. ^ a b c d "World Fantasy Award Judges". World Fantasy Convention Board. Archived from the original on 2013-01-13. Retrieved 2013-09-23.
  8. ^ Walling, René (2011-06-28). "The Coming of the Great Old Ones: A Statistical Look at the World Fantasy Awards for Best Novel". Tor.com. Tor Books. Archived from the original on 2013-08-22. Retrieved 2013-09-24.
  9. ^ "World Fantasy Convention Board". World Fantasy Convention Board. Archived from the original on 2016-01-19. Retrieved 2016-01-19.
  10. ^ "World Fantasy Award Judges". World Fantasy Convention Board. Archived from the original on 2015-12-03. Retrieved 2015-12-03.
  11. ^ a b "World Fantasy Convention Board Requirements". World Fantasy Convention Board. Archived from the original on 2016-01-19. Retrieved 2016-01-19.
  12. ^ "Supernatural convention set". Bangor Daily News. United Press International. 1975-10-09. p. 8. Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  13. ^ "World Fantasy Awards Tallies". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2016-01-19.
  14. ^ Tan, Corrie (2013-09-17). "'It's not like I can sell awards for money'". The Star. Star Publications. Archived from the original on 2013-09-24. Retrieved 2013-09-24.
  15. ^ a b Hermann, Brenda (1991-12-20). "Comic Book Wins Fiction Award For First, And Maybe Last, Time". Chicago Tribune. Tribune Company. Archived from the original on 2013-09-24. Retrieved 2013-09-24.
  16. ^ Waldrop, Howard (2010-10-23). Howard Who?: Stories. Small Beer Press. p. IV. ISBN 978-1-931520-18-8.
  17. ^ "We Are All Completely Fine wins the World Fantasy Award". Tachyon Publications. 2015-11-09. Archived from the original on 2015-12-07. Retrieved 2015-12-04.
  18. ^ Dozois, Gardner, ed. (1997-10-15). Modern Classics of Fantasy. St. Martin's Press. p. 44. ISBN 978-0-312-16931-2.
  19. ^ Jones, Stephen, ed. (2010-04-13). The Mammoth Book of the Best of the Best New Horror. Running Press. ISBN 978-0-7624-3841-9.
  20. ^ a b c Okorafor, Nnedi (2011-12-14). "Lovecraft's racism & The World Fantasy Award statuette, with comments from China Miéville". nnedi.blogspot.no. Retrieved 2015-12-03.
  21. ^ Klaw, Rick (2007-11-05). "The World Fantasy Award and Book Sales". Jeff VanderMeer. Archived from the original on 2014-08-11. Retrieved 2016-01-19.
  22. ^ Wilson, Gahan, ed. (1977). First World Fantasy Awards: An Anthology of the Fantastic. Doubleday. ISBN 978-0-385-12199-6.
  23. ^ Schiff, Stuart David; Leiber, Fritz, eds. (1980). The World Fantasy Awards: Volume Two. Doubleday. ISBN 978-0-385-15380-5.
  24. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1991". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2013-09-20.
  25. ^ "World Fantasy Awards Winners By Category". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2013-09-20.
  26. ^ Sullivan, Jack (1986). The Penguin Encyclopedia of Horror and the Supernatural. Viking Press. pp. 448–449. ISBN 0-670-80902-0.
  27. ^ Grant, John; Clute, John, eds. (1997-04-03). "Wandrei, Donald". The Encyclopedia of Fantasy. St. Martin's Press. pp. 994–5. ISBN 0-312-19869-8.
  28. ^ Tyson, Donald (2010-11-08). The Dream World of H. P. Lovecraft. Llewellyn Worldwide. p. 6. ISBN 978-0-7387-2284-9. The least palatable aspect of Lovecraft's character was his lifelong, deeply ingrained bigotry and racism.
  29. ^ Maroney, Kevin J. (August 2014). "Editorial: Chance of Face, Change of Heart". The New York Review of Science Fiction. Burrowing Wombat Press (312). ISSN 1052-9438. Archived from the original on 2015-09-08.
  30. ^ Flood, Alison (2015-11-11). "HP Lovecraft biographer rages against ditching of author as fantasy prize emblem". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2015-11-30. Retrieved 2015-12-03.

External links

Dan Simmons

Dan Simmons (born April 4, 1948) is an American science fiction and horror writer. He is the author of the Hyperion Cantos and the Ilium/Olympos cycles, among other works which span the science fiction, horror, and fantasy genres, sometimes within a single novel. A typical example of Simmons' intermingling of genres is Song of Kali (1985), winner of the World Fantasy Award. He also writes mysteries and thrillers, some of which feature the continuing character Joe Kurtz.

E. F. Bleiler

Everett Franklin Bleiler (April 30, 1920 – June 13, 2010) was an American editor, bibliographer, and scholar of science fiction, detective fiction, and fantasy literature. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, he co-edited the first "year's best" series of science fiction anthologies, and his Checklist of Fantastic Literature has been called "the foundation of modern SF bibliography". Among his other scholarly works are two Hugo Award–nominated volumes concerning early science fiction—Science-Fiction: The Early Years and Science-Fiction: The Gernsback Years—and the massive Guide to Supernatural Fiction.

Bleiler worked at Dover Publications from 1955, becoming executive vice-president of the company from 1967 until he left in 1977; he then worked for Charles Scribner's Sons until 1987. He edited a number of ghost story collections for Dover, containing what the genre historian Mike Ashley has described as "detailed and exemplary introductions".Bleiler received the Pilgrim Award for lifetime achievement in science fiction scholarship in 1984, the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 1988, the First Fandom Hall of Fame award in 1994, and the International Horror Guild Living Legend award in 2004.In the 1970s Bleiler wrote two works of fiction, which were not published until 2006: the fantasy novel Firegang: A Mythic Fantasy, set in the tree of Yggdrasil as well as moving across time and space, and Magistrate Mai and the Invisible Murderer, a detective story set in ancient China, similar to the work of Robert van Gulik.

Bleiler's son, Richard, is also a science fiction historian and assisted his father on several of his works.

Ellen Datlow

Ellen Datlow (born December 31, 1949) is an American science fiction, fantasy, and horror editor and anthologist.

Gandalf Award

The Gandalf Awards, honoring achievement in fantasy literature, were conferred by the World Science Fiction Society annually from 1974 to 1981. They were named for Gandalf the wizard, from the Middle-earth stories by J. R. R. Tolkien. The award was created and sponsored by Lin Carter and the Swordsmen and Sorcerers' Guild of America (SAGA), an association of fantasy writers. Recipients were selected by vote of participants in the World Science Fiction Conventions according to procedures of the older Hugo Awards.The awards were presented in two categories, for life achievement and for a book published during the preceding year. Their primary purpose continues to be fulfilled by two of the once-rival World Fantasy Awards, first presented in 1975—specifically the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement and World Fantasy Award for Best Novel.

Jane Yolen

Jane Hyatt Yolen (born February 11, 1939) is an American writer of fantasy, science fiction, and children's books. She is the author or editor of more than 365 books, of which the best known is The Devil's Arithmetic, a Holocaust novella. Her other works include the Nebula Award-winning short story Sister Emily's Lightship, the novelette Lost Girls, Owl Moon, The Emperor and the Kite, the Commander Toad series and How Do Dinosaurs Say Goodnight. She gave the lecture for the 1989 Alice G. Smith Lecture, the inaugural year for the series. This lecture series is held at the University of South Florida School of Information "to honor the memory of its first director, Alice Gullen Smith, known for her work with youth and bibliotherapy." In 2012 she became the first woman to give the Andrew Lang lecture.

Jo Walton

Jo Walton (born December 1, 1964) is a Welsh-Canadian fantasy and science fiction writer and poet. She won the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer in 2002 and the World Fantasy award for her novel Tooth and Claw in 2004. Her novel Ha'penny was a co-winner of the 2008 Prometheus Award. Her novel Lifelode won the 2010 Mythopoeic Award. Her novel Among Others won the 2011 Nebula Award for Best Novel, and the 2012 Hugo Award for Best Novel, and is one of only seven novels to have been nominated for the Hugo Award, Nebula Award, and World Fantasy Award.

John Crowley (author)

John Crowley (born December 1, 1942) is an American author of fantasy, science fiction and mainstream fiction. He studied at Indiana University and has a second career as a documentary film writer.

He is best known as the author of Little, Big (1981), which received the World Fantasy Award for Best Novel and has been called "a neglected masterpiece" by Harold Bloom, and his Ægypt series of novels which revolve around the same themes of Hermeticism, memory, families and religion.

Crowley wrote the bi-monthly "Easy Chair" essay in Harper's Magazine for a year; his last column appeared in the February 2016 issue.

Kelly Link

Kelly Link (born 1969) is an American editor and author of short stories. While some of her fiction falls more clearly within genre categories, many of her stories might be described as slipstream or magic realism: a combination of science fiction, fantasy, horror, mystery, and realism. Among other honors, she has won a Hugo award, three Nebula awards, and a World Fantasy Award for her fiction, and she was one of the recipients of the 2018 MacArthur "Genius" Grant.

Kim Stanley Robinson

Kim Stanley Robinson (born March 23, 1952) is an American writer of science fiction. He has published nineteen novels and numerous short stories but is best known for his Mars trilogy. His work has been translated into 24 languages. Many of his novels and stories have ecological, cultural, and political themes running through them and feature scientists as heroes. Robinson has won numerous awards, including the Hugo Award for Best Novel, the Nebula Award for Best Novel and the World Fantasy Award. Robinson's work has been labeled by The Atlantic as "the gold-standard of realistic, and highly literary, science-fiction writing." According to an article in The New Yorker, Robinson is "generally acknowledged as one of the greatest living science-fiction writers."

Margo Lanagan

Margo Lanagan (born 1960) in Waratah, New South Wales is an Australian writer of short stories and young adult fiction.

Patricia A. McKillip

Patricia Anne McKillip (born February 29, 1948) is an American author of fantasy and science fiction novels, which have been winners of the World Fantasy Award, the Locus Award, and the Mythopoeic Award. In 2008, she was a recipient of the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement. She lives in Oregon and is married to David Lunde, a poet. According to Fantasy Book Review, McKillip grew up in Oregon, Great Britain, and Germany and received a B.A. in English in 1971 and a master of arts in 1973 from San Jose State University. Most of her recent novels feature cover paintings by Kinuko Y. Craft.

Peter S. Beagle

Peter Soyer Beagle (born April 20, 1939) is an American novelist and screenwriter, especially fantasy fiction. His best-known work is The Last Unicorn (1968), a fantasy novel he wrote in his twenties, which Locus subscribers voted the number five "All-Time Best Fantasy Novel" in 1987. During the last twenty-five years he has won several literary awards, including a World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 2011. He was named Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master by SFWA in 2018.

Peter Straub

Peter Francis Straub (; born March 2, 1943) is an American novelist and poet. His horror fiction has received numerous literary honors such as the Bram Stoker Award, World Fantasy Award, and International Horror Guild Award.

Stephen King bibliography

The following is a complete list of books published by Stephen King, an American author of contemporary horror, suspense, science fiction, and fantasy. His books have sold more than 350 million copies, and many of them have been adapted into feature films, television movies and comic books. King has published 60 novels, including seven under the pen name Richard Bachman, and five non-fiction books. He has written over 200 short stories, most of which have been compiled in book collections. Many of his stories are set in his home state of Maine.

Tim Powers

Timothy Thomas "Tim" Powers (born February 29, 1952) is an American science fiction and fantasy author. Powers has won the World Fantasy Award twice for his critically acclaimed novels Last Call and Declare. His 1987 novel On Stranger Tides served as inspiration for the Monkey Island franchise of video games and was optioned for adaptation into the fourth Pirates of the Caribbean film.

Most of Powers' novels are "secret histories". He uses actual, documented historical events featuring famous people, but shows another view of them in which occult or supernatural factors heavily influence the motivations and actions of the characters.

Typically, Powers strictly adheres to established historical facts. He reads extensively on a given subject, and the plot develops as he notes inconsistencies, gaps and curious data; regarding his 2001 novel Declare, he stated,

I made it an ironclad rule that I could not change or disregard any of the recorded facts, nor rearrange any days of the calendar – and then I tried to figure out what momentous but unrecorded fact could explain them all.

World Fantasy Award—Life Achievement

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction and fantasy art published in English during the preceding calendar year. The awards have been described by sources such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and as one of the three most renowned speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Life Achievement is given each year to individuals for their overall career in fields related to fantasy. These have included, for example, authors, editors, and publishers. The specific nomination reasons are not given, and nominees are not required to have retired, though they can only win once. The Life Achievement category has been awarded annually since 1975.World Fantasy Award nominees are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner of each category. Unlike the other World Fantasy Award categories, the nominees for the Life Achievement award are not announced; instead, the winner is announced along with the nominees in the other categories. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors, and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Through 2015, winners were presented with a statuette of H. P. Lovecraft; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 69 people have been given the Life Achievement Award. Multiple winners have been awarded 21 times, typically two co-winners, though five were noted in 1984. Since 2000 it has become an unofficial tradition for two winners to be announced, often with one winner primarily an author and the other not. While most winners have been authors and editors, five winners have been primarily artists of fantasy art and book covers, and four winners are best known for founding or running publishing houses that produce fantasy works.

World Fantasy Award—Long Fiction

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction published in English during the previous calendar year. The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Long Fiction is given each year for fantasy stories published in English. A work of fiction is eligible for the category if it is between 10,000 and 40,000 words in length; awards are also given out for longer pieces in the Novel category and shorter lengths in the Short Fiction category. The Long Fiction category has been awarded annually since 1982, though between 1975—when the World Fantasy Awards were instated—and 1982 the short fiction category covered works of up to 40,000 words. In 2016, the name of the category was changed from Best Novella to Long Fiction.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 37 nomination years, 131 authors have had works nominated; 37 of them have won, including ties and co-authors. Only four authors have won more than once: Elizabeth Hand, with three wins out of eight nominations; Richard Bowes, with two wins out of three nominations; K. J. Parker, who also won twice out of three nominations; and Ellen Klages, with two wins out of two nominations. Of authors who have won at least once, Hand has the most nominations, followed by George R. R. Martin at five and Ursula K. Le Guin at four. Lucius Shepard has the most nominations without winning and the most overall at ten; he is followed by Kim Newman, who has six nominations without winning.

World Fantasy Award—Novel

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction published in English during the previous calendar year. The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Novel is given each year for fantasy novels published in English or translated into English. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as a novel if it is 40,000 words or longer; awards are also given out for pieces of shorter lengths in the Short Fiction and Long Fiction categories. The Novel category has been awarded annually since 1975.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 154 authors have had works nominated; 45 of them have won, including ties. Five authors have won twice: Gene Wolfe, out of eight nominations; Tim Powers, out of five; Patricia McKillip, out of four; Jeffrey Ford, out of three; and James K. Morrow for both of his nominations. Wolfe has the most nominations for an author who has won at least once, while Stephen King has the most nominations without winning, at nine, followed by Charles L. Grant at six and Jonathan Carroll at five.

World Fantasy Award—Short Fiction

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction published in English during the previous calendar year. The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Short Fiction is given each year for fantasy short stories published in English. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as short fiction if it is 10,000 words or less in length; awards are also given out for longer pieces in the Novel and Long Fiction categories. The Short Fiction category has been awarded annually since 1975, though before 1982—when the category was instated—it was named "Best Short Fiction" and covered works of up to 40,000 words. It was then renamed "Best Short Story" until 2016, when it was renamed to the "Short Fiction" category.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 160 authors have had works nominated; 44 of them have won, including ties and co-authors. Only five authors have won more than once: Ramsey Campbell and James Blaylock with two wins out of four nominations each, Stephen King won two out of three, and Tanith Lee and Fred Chappell won both times they were nominated. Of authors who have won at least once, Jeffrey Ford and Kelly Link have the most nominations at five, followed by Dennis Etchison and Avram Davidson, who along with Campbell and Blaylock received four nominations. Charles de Lint has the most nominations without winning at five; he is followed by Michael Swanwick, who has had four nominations without winning.

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