Worksop

Worksop (/ˈwɜːrksɒp/ WURK-sop) is the largest town in the Bassetlaw district of Nottinghamshire, England. Worksop lies on the River Ryton, and is located at the northern edge of Sherwood Forest. Worksop is located 19 miles (31 km) east-south-east of Sheffield, with a population of 41,820.[2]It lies close to Nottinghamshire’s borders with South Yorkshire, and Derbyshire.

Worksop has become a commuter town as a result of its geographic location and ease of access to major motorways and rail links.

Worksop is known as the "Gateway to The Dukeries", because of the now four obsolete ducal principal sites of which were closely located next to each other, south of the town. These four ducal locations were; Clumber House, Thoresby Hall, Welbeck Abbey and Worksop Manor. Other houses such as Rufford Abbey and Hodsock Priory are also just a few miles away

Worksop is twinned with the German town Garbsen.

Worksop
Approaching Worksop Town Lock - geograph.org.uk - 453354

Approaching Worksop Town Lock
Worksop is located in Nottinghamshire
Worksop
Worksop
Location within Nottinghamshire
Population41,820 [1]
DemonymWorksopian
OS grid referenceSK 58338 78967
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townWORKSOP
Postcode districtS80, S81
Dialling code01909
PoliceNottinghamshire
FireNottinghamshire
AmbulanceEast Midlands
EU ParliamentEast Midlands
UK Parliament

History

Evidence that Worksop existed before the Norman conquest of England in 1066 is provided by the Domesday Book of 1086:

"In Werchesope, (Worksop) Elsi (son of Caschin) had three carucates of land to be taxed. Land to eight ploughs. Roger has one plough in the demesne there, and twenty-two sokemen who hold twelve oxgangs of this land, and twenty-four villanes and eight bordars having twenty-two ploughs, and seven acres of meadow. Wood pasture two miles long, and three quarentens broad."[3]

In about 1103, William de Lovetot established a castle and the Augustinian priory at Worksop. Subsequently, Worksop grew into a market town.

A skirmish occurred in the area during the Wars of the Roses on 16 December 1460, commonly known as the Battle of Worksop.

The building of the Chesterfield Canal in 1777, and the subsequent construction of the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway in 1849, both of which passed through the settlement, led to a degree of growth. Discovery of sizeable coal seams further increased interest in the area.

Coal mining provided thousands of jobs in and around Worksop for most of the 19th and 20th centuries, but by the 1990s the pits had closed, resulting in high local unemployment. Drug abuse in the area also soared.[4]

Unemployment levels in the area are now lower than the national average, owing to large number of distribution and local manufacturing companies, including Premier Foods, Wilko, RDS Transport, Pandrol UK Ltd and Laing O'Rourke.

Transport

Worksop lies on the A57 and A60 with links to the A1 and M1.

Worksop is on the Sheffield-Lincoln line, with direct services running to Sheffield, Leeds and Lincoln. Services call at Retford, Gainsborough, Saxilby, Shireoaks, Kiveton Park, Kiveton Bridge, Woodhouse, Darnall, Meadowhall, Barnsley and Wakefield. These services are run by Northern. Worksop is also the terminus of the Robin Hood line to Nottingham via Mansfield, a service run by East Midlands Trains. At weekends Northern run additional services to Grimsby and Cleethorpes via Worksop.

Bus services provided by Stagecoach East Midlands operate in the town to Doncaster, Shireoaks, Langold, Harworth, Bawtry, Retford, Blyth, Bircotes, Clowne, Tickhill, Chesterfield, Ollerton, and Nottingham, Stagecoach also run internal services within Worksop.

Education

Primary

  • Gateford Park Primary School
  • Holy Family Catholic Primary School
  • Norbridge Academy
  • Prospect Hill Infant and Nursery School
  • Redlands Primary And Nursery School
  • Sparken Hill Academy (was called Ryton Park Primary School)
  • Sir Edmund Hillary Primary School
  • St. Augustine's School
  • St Anne's C Of E (Aided) Primary School
  • St John's Primary School
  • Worksop Priory C of E Primary Academy[5]

Secondary

Further education

Healthcare

Worksop is served by Bassetlaw District General Hospital, part of the Doncaster and Bassetlaw NHS Foundation Trust. Bassetlaw Hospital treats ~33,000 people each year, as well as ~38,000 emergencies. Bassetlaw Hospital is one of the University of Sheffield Teaching hospitals Medical School.

Mental Health services in Worksop are provided by Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust who provide both in-patient and community services. Wards run by Nottinghamshire Healthcare provide training for medical students at the University of Nottingham.

Local economy

The local economy in Worksop is dominated by service industries, manufacturing and distribution.

Major employers in the area include Premier Foods, Greencore, Wilko UK headquarters and distribution centre, RDS Transport (the Flying Fridge), B&Q distribution centre, MAKE polymers,[6] OCG Cacao, part of Cargill, Pandrol, GCHQ and the NHS (Doncaster and Bassetlaw NHS Trust and Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust).

Religion

St Anne's Church, Worksop - geograph.org.uk - 106073
St Anne's Church

Worksop has three churches which are all on the National Heritage List for England.

Officially titled the Priory Church of Saint Mary and Saint Cuthbert, is the Anglican parish church usually known as Worksop Priory. It was an Augustinian Priory founded in 1103. The church has a nave and detached gatehouse. Monks at the priory made the Tickhill Psalter, an illuminated manuscripts of the medieval period, now held in New York Public Library. After the dissolution of the Monasteries the east end of the church fell into disrepair, but the townspeople were granted the nave as a parish church. The eastern parts of the building have been restored in several phases, the most recent being in the 1970s when the architect Lawrence King rebuilt the crossing.

St. Anne's Church is an Anglican parish church and is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.[7] The church was built in 1911 by the Lancaster architects Austin and Paley.[8][9] The church has an historic pipe organ originally built by Gray and Davison in 1852 for Clapham Congregational Church.

St. John's Church is a Parish church built between 1867 and 1868 by architect Robert Clarke.

Places of interest

Mr Straw's House, the family home of the Straw family, was inherited by the Straw brothers, William and Walter when their parents died in the 1930s. The house remained unaltered until the National Trust acquired it in the 1990s and opened it to the public.[10] Clumber Park, south of Worksop is a country park, also owned by the National Trust, and is open to the public.

Notable people

References

Notes

  1. ^ "WORKSOP in Nottinghamshire (East Midlands)".
  2. ^ citypopulation.info
  3. ^ White, Robert (1875) Worksop, The Dukery, and Sherwood Forest. Transcription at Nicholson, AP: Nottinghamshire History (Accessed 24 December 2005).
  4. ^ Boniface, Susie (24 October 2010). "George Osborne wreaks havoc .. just like Margaret Thatcher in 1980s". The Mirror.
  5. ^ "Worksop Priory C of E Primary Academy". Nottinghamshire County Council. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  6. ^ "Site confirmed for MBA Polymers' UK plant". Recycling International. Archived from the original on 11 June 2016. Retrieved 12 April 2014.
  7. ^ Historic England, "Church of St Anne, Worksop (1045754)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 30 August 2012
  8. ^ Pevsner 1979, p. 389.
  9. ^ Brandwood et al. 2012, p. 248.
  10. ^ Mr Straw's House Archived 8 May 2006 at the Wayback Machine by The National Trust, accessed 28 May 2006.
  11. ^ "James Walsham Baldock". www.avictorian.com. Retrieved 14 January 2019.
  12. ^ "VIDEO AND PICTURES: Sheffield internet star makes suit out of BREAD and then feeds himself to ducks". www.thestar.co.uk. Retrieved 18 February 2019.

Sources

  • Brandwood, Geoff; Austin, Tim; Hughes, John; Price, James (2012), The Architecture of Sharpe, Paley and Austin, Swindon: English Heritage, ISBN 978-1-84802-049-8
  • Pevsner, Nikolaus (1979), Nottinghamshire, Pevsner Architectural Guides: Buildings of England (2nd ed.), New Haven and London: [[Yale University II listed building. Press]], ISBN 978-0300096361

External links

2003 Bassetlaw District Council election

The 2003 Bassetlaw District Council election took place on 1 May 2003 to elect members of Bassetlaw District Council in Nottinghamshire, England as part of the 2003 United Kingdom local elections. One third of the council was up for election.

2004 Bassetlaw District Council election

The 2004 Bassetlaw District Council election took place on 10 June 2004 to elect members of Bassetlaw District Council in Nottinghamshire, England as part of the 2004 United Kingdom local elections. One third of the council was up for election.

2006 Bassetlaw District Council election

The 2006 Bassetlaw District Council election took place on 4 May 2006 to elect members of Bassetlaw District Council in Nottinghamshire, England. One third of the council was up for election.

2007 Bassetlaw District Council election

The 2007 Bassetlaw District Council election took place on 3 May 2007 to elect members of Bassetlaw District Council in Nottinghamshire, England. One third of the council was up for election.

2008 Bassetlaw District Council election

The 2008 Bassetlaw District Council election took place on 1 May 2008 to elect members of Bassetlaw District Council in Nottinghamshire, England. One third of the council was up for election.

After the election, the composition of the council was:

Conservative 30

Labour 16

Others 2

2010 Bassetlaw District Council election

The 2010 Bassetlaw District Council election took place on 6 May 2010 to elect members of Bassetlaw District Council in Nottinghamshire, England as part of the 2010 United Kingdom local elections. One third of the council was up for election.

After the election, the composition of the council was:

Conservative 25

Labour 20

Independents 3

2011 Bassetlaw District Council election

The 2011 Bassetlaw District Council election took place on 5 May 2011 to elect members of Bassetlaw District Council in Nottinghamshire, England as part of the 2011 United Kingdom local elections. One third of the council was up for election. A UK-wide referendum on whether to adopt the Alternative Vote electoral system was also held on this date.

After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 27

Conservative 18

Independents 3

2012 Bassetlaw District Council election

The 2012 Bassetlaw District Council election took place on 3 May 2012 to elect members of Bassetlaw District Council in Nottinghamshire, England as part of the 2012 United Kingdom local elections. One third of the council was up for election. After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 34

Conservative 11

Independents 3

2014 Bassetlaw District Council election

The 2014 Bassetlaw District Council election took place on 22 May 2014 to elect members of Bassetlaw District Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections. One third of the council was up for election.

2015 Bassetlaw District Council election

The 2015 Bassetlaw District Council election took place on 7 May 2015, to elect all 48 members of Bassetlaw District Council in England. This was on the same day as the 2015 general election and other local elections.Prior to this election, the council decided to move to all-out elections from 2015. Previously, the council had been elected by thirds with district elections being held every year except the year in which elections to Nottinghamshire County Council were held in the area. Councillors elected at this election will serve a four-year term and face re-election in 2019.

Bassetlaw District

Bassetlaw is the northernmost district of Nottinghamshire, England, with a population of 114,143 according to the mid-2014 estimate by the Office for National Statistics. The borough is predominantly rural, with two towns: Worksop, site of the borough council offices, and Retford. The district was formed on 1 April 1974 by the merger of the boroughs of Worksop and East Retford and most of Worksop Rural District and most of East Retford Rural District. It is named after the historic Bassetlaw wapentake of Nottinghamshire.

The district council is now a non-constituent partner member of the Sheffield City Region Combined Authority.

Midlands 4 East (North)

Midlands 4 East (North) is a level 9 English Rugby Union league and level 4 of the Midlands League, made up of teams from the northern part of the East Midlands region including clubs from Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire and the occasional team from Leicestershire, with home and away matches played throughout the season. Each year some of the clubs in this division also take part in the RFU Junior Vase - a level 9-12 national competition.

Formed for the 2006-07 season, the division was originally known as Midlands 5 East (North) but changed to its present name for the 2008-09 season due to league restructuring. Promoted teams tend to move up to Midlands 3 East (North). Up until the 2017-18 relegated teams dropped down to Midlands 5 East (North) but since that division has been abolished there is currently no relegation.

Sheffield

Sheffield is a city and metropolitan borough in South Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, its name derives from the River Sheaf, which runs through the city. With some of its southern suburbs annexed from Derbyshire, the city has grown from its largely industrial roots to encompass a wider economic base. The population of the City of Sheffield is 577,800 (mid-2017 est.) and it is one of the eight largest regional English cities that make up the Core Cities Group. Sheffield is the third-largest English district by population. The metropolitan population of Sheffield is 1,569,000.The city is in the eastern foothills of the Pennines, and the valleys of the River Don and its four tributaries, the Loxley, the Porter Brook, the Rivelin and the Sheaf. Sixty-one per cent of Sheffield's entire area is green space, and a third of the city lies within the Peak District national park. There are more than 250 parks, woodlands and gardens in the city, which is estimated to contain around 4.5 million trees.Sheffield played a crucial role in the Industrial Revolution, with many significant inventions and technologies developed in the city. In the 19th century, the city saw a huge expansion of its traditional cutlery trade, when stainless steel and crucible steel were developed locally, fuelling an almost tenfold increase in the population. Sheffield received its municipal charter in 1843, becoming the City of Sheffield in 1893. International competition in iron and steel caused a decline in these industries in the 1970s and 1980s, coinciding with the collapse of coal mining in the area.

The 21st century has seen extensive redevelopment in Sheffield, along with other British cities. Sheffield's gross value added (GVA) has increased by 60% since 1997, standing at £9.2 billion in 2007. The economy has experienced steady growth averaging around 5% annually, greater than that of the broader region of Yorkshire and the Humber.The city has a long sporting heritage, and is home to the world's oldest football club, Sheffield F.C. Games between the two professional clubs, Sheffield United and Sheffield Wednesday, are known as the Steel City derby. The city is also home to the World Snooker Championship and the Sheffield Steelers, the UK's first professional ice hockey team.

Worksop College

Worksop College (formerly St Cuthbert's College) is a British co-educational independent school for both day and boarding pupils aged 13 to 18, in Worksop. It sits at the northern edge of Sherwood Forest, in Nottinghamshire, England. Founded by Nathaniel Woodard in 1890, the school is a member of the Woodard Corporation and Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference, and has a strong Anglo-Catholic tradition.

Worksop Greyhound Stadium

Worksop Greyhound Stadium was a greyhound racing stadium situated off Claylands Avenue, in Worksop, Nottinghamshire.

Worksop Town F.C.

Worksop Town Football Club is an English football club based in Worksop, Nottinghamshire. They play in the Premier Division of the Northern Counties East League at level 9 of the English football league system. They are nicknamed the Tigers, and usually sport an amber and black home kit.

The club are currently playing their home games at Handsworth Parramore's Sandy Lane ground – a ground Worksop used to own themselves.

Worksop railway station

Worksop railway station is a Grade II listed railway station which serves the town of Worksop in Nottinghamshire, England.

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