Wired (magazine)

Wired is a monthly American magazine, published in print and online editions, that focuses on how emerging technologies affect culture, the economy, and politics. Owned by Condé Nast, it is headquartered in San Francisco, California, and has been in publication since March/April 1993.[2] Several spin-offs have been launched, including Wired UK, Wired Italia, Wired Japan, and Wired Germany. Condé Nast's parent company Advance publications is also the major shareholder of Reddit, an internet information conglomeration website.[3]

In its earliest colophons, Wired credited Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan as its "patron saint." From its beginning, the strongest influence on the magazine's editorial outlook came from techno-utopian cofounder Stewart Brand and his associate Kevin Kelly.[4]

From 1998 to 2006, Wired magazine and Wired News (which publishes at Wired.com) had separate owners. However, Wired News remained responsible for republishing Wired magazine's content online due to an agreement when Condé Nast purchased the magazine. In 2006, Condé Nast bought Wired News for $25 million, reuniting the magazine with its website.

Wired contributor Chris Anderson is known for popularizing the term "the Long Tail",[5] as a phrase relating to a "power law"-type graph that helps to visualize the 2000s emergent new media business model. Anderson's article for Wired on this paradigm related to research on power law distribution models carried out by Clay Shirky, specifically in relation to bloggers. Anderson widened the definition of the term in capitals to describe a specific point of view relating to what he sees as an overlooked aspect of the traditional market space that has been opened up by new media.[6]

The magazine coined the term "crowdsourcing",[7] as well as its annual tradition of handing out Vaporware Awards, which recognize "products, videogames and other nerdy tidbits pitched, promised and hyped, but never delivered".[8]

Wired
Wired logo
Editor-in-ChiefNicholas Thompson
Former editorsLouis Rossetto
CategoriesBusiness, technology, lifestyle, thought leader
FrequencyMonthly
Total circulation
(January 2017)
870,101[1]
First issueMarch/April 1993
CompanyCondé Nast Publications
CountryUnited States
37°46′51″N 122°23′45″W / 37.7808°N 122.3957°W
Based inSan Francisco, California, U.S.
LanguageEnglish
Websitewww.wired.com
ISSN1059-1028 (print)
1078-3148 (web)
OCLC number24479723

History

Cover of Wired issue 1.04 September October 1993
Cover of Wired issue 1.4 September/October 1993

The magazine was founded by American journalist Louis Rossetto and his partner Jane Metcalfe, along with Ian Charles Stewart, in 1993 with initial backing from software entrepreneur Charlie Jackson and eclectic academic Nicholas Negroponte of the MIT Media Lab, who was a regular columnist for six years (through 1998) and wrote the book Being Digital. The founding designers were John Plunkett and Barbara Kuhr (Plunkett+Kuhr), beginning with a 1991 prototype and continuing through the first five years of publication, 1993–98.

Wired, which touted itself as "the Rolling Stone of technology",[9] made its debut at the Macworld conference on January 2, 1993.[10] A great success at its launch, it was lauded for its vision, originality, innovation, and cultural impact. In its first four years, the magazine won two National Magazine Awards for General Excellence and one for Design.

Wikia and Wired Building location-9387
Wired building located in San Francisco

The founding executive editor of Wired, Kevin Kelly, was an editor of the Whole Earth Catalog and the Whole Earth Review and brought with him contributing writers from those publications. Six authors of the first Wired issue (1.1) had written for Whole Earth Review, most notably Bruce Sterling (who was highlighted on the first cover)[2] and Stewart Brand. Other contributors to Whole Earth appeared in Wired, including William Gibson, who was featured on Wired's cover in its first year and whose article "Disneyland with the Death Penalty" in issue 1.4 resulted in the publication being banned in Singapore.[11]

Wired cofounder Louis Rossetto claimed in the magazine's first issue that "the Digital Revolution is whipping through our lives like a Bengali typhoon,"[12] yet despite the fact that Kelly was involved in launching the WELL, an early source of public access to the Internet and even earlier non-Internet online experience, Wired's first issue de-emphasized the Internet and covered interactive games, cell-phone hacking, digital special effects, military simulations, and Japanese otaku. However, the first issue did contain a few references to the Internet, including online dating and Internet sex, and a tutorial on how to install a bozo filter. The last page, a column written by Nicholas Negroponte, was written in the style of an email message but contained obviously fake, non-standard email addresses. By the third issue in the fall of 1993, the "Net Surf" column began listing interesting FTP sites, Usenet newsgroups, and email addresses, at a time when the numbers of these things were small and this information was still extremely novel to the public. Wired was among the first magazines to list the email address of its authors and contributors.

Associate publisher Kathleen Lyman (formerly of News Corporation and Ziff Davis) was brought on board to launch Wired with an advertising base of major technology and consumer advertisers. Lyman, along with Simon Ferguson (Wired's first advertising manager), introduced revolutionary ad campaigns by a diverse group of industry leaders—such as Apple Computer, Intel, Sony, Calvin Klein, and Absolut—to the readers of the first technology publication with a lifestyle slant.

The magazine was quickly followed by a companion website (HotWired), a book publishing division (HardWired), a Japanese edition, and a short-lived British edition (Wired UK). Wired UK was relaunched in April 2009.[13] In 1994, John Battelle, cofounding editor, commissioned Jules Marshall to write a piece on the Zippies. The cover story broke records for being one of the most publicized stories of the year and was used to promote Wired's HotWired news service.[14]

HotWired spawned websites Webmonkey, the search engine HotBot, and a weblog, Suck.com. In June 1998, the magazine launched a stock index, the Wired Index, called the Wired 40 since July 2003.

The fortune of the magazine and allied enterprises corresponded closely to that of the dot-com bubble. In 1996, Rossetto and the other participants in Wired Ventures attempted to take the company public with an IPO. The initial attempt had to be withdrawn in the face of a downturn in the stock market, and especially the Internet sector, during the summer of 1996. The second try was also unsuccessful.

Rossetto and Metcalfe lost control of Wired Ventures to financial investors Providence Equity Partners in May 1998, which quickly sold off the company in pieces. Wired was purchased by Advance Publications, which assigned it to Advance's subsidiary, New York-based publisher Condé Nast Publications (while keeping Wired's editorial offices in San Francisco).[15] Wired Digital (wired.com, hotbot.com, webmonkey.com, etc.) was purchased by Lycos and run independently from the rest of the magazine until 2006, when it was sold by Lycos to Advance Publications, returning the websites back to the same company that published the magazine.

The Anderson era

Wired Wilco
Wilco at the Wired Rave Awards in 2003

Wired survived the dot-com bubble and found new direction under editor-in-chief Chris Anderson in 2001, making the magazine's coverage "more mainstream".[16]

Under Anderson, Wired has produced some widely noted articles, including the April 2003 "Welcome to the Hydrogen Economy" story, the November 2003 "Open Source Everywhere" issue (which put Linus Torvalds on the cover and articulated the idea that the open-source method was taking off outside of software, including encyclopedias as evidenced by Wikipedia), the February 2004 "Kiss Your Cubicle Goodbye" issue (which presented the outsourcing issue from both American and Indian perspectives), and an October 2004 article by Chris Anderson, which coined the popular term "Long Tail".

The November 2004 issue of Wired was published with The Wired CD. All of the songs on the CD were released under various Creative Commons licenses, an attempt to push alternative copyright into the spotlight. Most of the songs were contributed by major artists, including the Beastie Boys, My Morning Jacket, Paul Westerberg, and David Byrne.

In 2005, Wired received the National Magazine Award for General Excellence in the category of 500,000 to 1,000,000 subscribers.[17] That same year, Anderson won Advertising Age's editor of the year award.[17] In May 2007, the magazine again won the National Magazine Award for General Excellence.[18] In 2008, Wired was nominated for three National Magazine Awards and won the ASME for Design. It also took home 14 Society of Publication Design Awards, including the Gold for Magazine of the Year. In 2009, Wired was nominated for four National Magazine Awards – including General Excellence, Design, Best Section (Start), and Integration – and won three: General Excellence, Design, and Best Section (Start). David Rowan from Wired UK was awarded the BSME Launch of the Year 2009 Award.[19] On December 14, 2009, Wired magazine was named Magazine of the Decade by the editors of Adweek.[20]

In 2006, writer Jeff Howe and editor Mark Robinson coined the term crowdsourcing in the June issue.[21]

In 2009, Condé Nast Italia launched the Italian edition of Wired and Wired.it.[22] On April 2, 2009, Condé Nast relaunched the UK edition of Wired, edited by David Rowan, and launched Wired.co.uk.[23] Also in 2009, Wired writer Evan Ratliff "vanished", attempting to keep his whereabouts secret, saying "I will try to stay hidden for 30 days." A $5,000 reward was offered to his finder(s).[24] Ratliff was found September 8 in New Orleans by a team effort, which was written about by Ratliff in a later issue. In 2010, Wired released its tablet edition.[25]

In 2012, Limor Fried became the first female engineer featured on the cover of Wired.[26]

In May 2013, Wired joined the Digital Video Network with the announcement of five original webseries, including the National Security Agency satire Codefellas and the animated advice series Mister Know-It-All.[27][28]

In November 2016, David Moretti was appointed Creative Director.[29]

Wired endorsed Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in the run-up for the 2016 U.S. presidential election.[30]

Website

Wired
Type of site
Technology news
OwnerCondé Nast;
formerly Lycos;
originally Wired magazine
Websitewww.wired.com
Alexa rankPositive decrease 1,200 (as of March 18, 2017)[31]
CommercialYes
LaunchedNovember 20, 1992
Current statusActive

The Wired website, formerly known as Wired News and HotWired, launched in October 1994.[32] It split off from the magazine when it was purchased by Condé Nast Publishing in the 1990s. Wired News was owned by Lycos not long after the split, until Condé Nast purchased Wired News on July 11, 2006.[33]

Wired.com hosts several technology blogs on topics in transportation, security, business, new products, video games, the "GeekDad" blog on toys, creating websites, cameras, culture, and science. It also publishes the Vaporware Awards.

As of February 2018, Wired.com is paywalled. Users may only access up to 4 articles per-month without payment.[34]

NextFest

Wired nextfest logo
Wired NextFest

From 2004 to 2008, Wired organized an annual "festival of innovative products and technologies".[35] A NextFest for 2009 was canceled.[36]

Supplement

Geekipedia
The Geekipedia supplement
  • Geekipedia is a supplement to Wired.[37]

Contributors

Wired's writers have included Jorn Barger, John Perry Barlow, John Battelle, Paul Boutin, Stewart Brand, Gareth Branwyn, Po Bronson, Scott Carney, Michael Chorost, Douglas Coupland, James Daly, Joshua Davis, J. Bradford DeLong, Mark Dery, David Diamond, Cory Doctorow, Esther Dyson, Mark Frauenfelder, Simson Garfinkel, William Gibson, Dan Gillmor Mike Godwin, George Gilder, Lou Ann Hammond, Chris Hardwick, Virginia Heffernan, Danny Hillis, John Hodgman, Steven Johnson, Bill Joy, Richard Kadrey, Leander Kahney, Jon Katz, Jaron Lanier, Lawrence Lessig, Paul Levinson, Steven Levy, John Markoff, Wil McCarthy, Russ Mitchell, Glyn Moody, Belinda Parmar, Charles Platt, Josh Quittner, Spencer Reiss, Howard Rheingold, Rudy Rucker, Paul Saffo, Adam Savage, Evan Schwartz, Peter Schwartz, Alex Steffen, Neal Stephenson, Bruce Sterling, Kevin Warwick, Dave Winer, and Gary Wolf.

Guest editors have included director J. J. Abrams, filmmaker James Cameron, architect Rem Koolhaas, former US President Barack Obama, director Christopher Nolan, tennis player Serena Williams, and video game designer Will Wright.

See also

References

  1. ^ "WMG Media Kit 2017" (PDF). Retrieved March 3, 2018.
  2. ^ a b Alex French. "The Very First Issues of 19 Famous Magazines". Mental Floss. Retrieved August 10, 2015.
  3. ^ Greenberg, Juliane (28 July 2015). "For the Record: The Relationship Between WIRED and Reddit". Wired. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  4. ^ Stahlman, Mark (1996). "The English ideology and Wired Magazine". Imaginary Futures. Retrieved June 15, 2011.
  5. ^ Manjoo, Farhad (July 14, 2008). "Long Tails and Big Heads". Slate.
  6. ^ Anderson, Chris (May 8, 2005). "The Long Tail". Wired. Retrieved July 11, 2017.
  7. ^ Whitford, David (March 22, 2007). "Hired Guns on the Cheap". Fortune Small Business. Retrieved August 7, 2007.
  8. ^ Calore, Michael (March 11, 2011). "Vaporware 2010: The Great White Duke". Wired.
  9. ^ Cobb, Nathan (November 24, 1992). "Terminal Chic: Technology is moving out of computers and into the culture". The Boston Globe. p. 29.
  10. ^ Carr, David (July 27, 2003). "The Coolest Magazine on the Planet". New York Times.
  11. ^ Mehegan, David (March 1, 1995). "Multimedia Animal Wired Visionary Nicholas Negroponte is MIT's Loud Voice of the Future". The Boston Globe.
  12. ^ Leonard, Andrew (August 18, 1998). "Wired: The book". Salon.com. Retrieved June 24, 2011.
  13. ^ Brook, Stephen (June 30, 2008). "Condé Nast to launch Wired in the UK". The Guardian. London.
  14. ^ Wired. July 1994. p. 133.
  15. ^ Leibovich, Lori (May 8, 1998). "Wired nests with Condé Nast: Will the magazine's new owners dull its edge?". Salon.com. Retrieved June 24, 2011.
  16. ^ Clifford, Stephanie (May 18, 2009). "Wired Struggles to Find Niche in Magazine World". New York Times. New York. Retrieved June 23, 2011.
  17. ^ a b "Edge: Chris Anderson". Edge Foundation. Retrieved July 19, 2007.
  18. ^ "2007 National Magazine Award Winners Announced" (Press release). American Society of Magazine Editors. May 1, 2007.
  19. ^ "2009 BSME Awards: The 2009 Winners". British Society of Magazine Editors. Archived from the original on November 15, 2009. Retrieved December 8, 2009.
  20. ^ "Magazine of the Decade: Wired". AdweekMedia: Best of the 2000s. Retrieved December 19, 2009.
  21. ^ David Whitford (March 22, 2007). "Hired Guns on the Cheap". Fortune Small Business. Retrieved August 7, 2007.
  22. ^ "Anche l'Italia è Wired: ecco le reazioni dei blogger". Sky Italia (in Italian). March 5, 2009. Archived from the original on March 7, 2009. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  23. ^ Andrews, Robert (March 26, 2009). "Wired.co.uk Goes Live Ahead Of April 2 Mag Relaunch". paidContent:UK. Archived from the original on November 25, 2009.
  24. ^ Ratliff, Evan (August 14, 2009). "Author Evan Ratliff Is on the Lam. Locate Him and Win $5,000". Wired.
  25. ^ "Wired Pushes Digital-First Strategy With Facebook Exclusive". Retrieved May 29, 2018.
  26. ^ "Meet the maker - MIT News Office". Web.mit.edu. May 31, 2013. Retrieved June 16, 2013.
  27. ^ Erik Hayden (May 15, 2013). "Conde Nast Entertainment Launches 'Wired' Video Channel". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved June 23, 2013.
  28. ^ Erik Maza (May 2, 2013). "Condé Entertainment Previews Video Channels for Vogue, Wired and Vanity Fair". Women's Wear Daily. Retrieved June 23, 2013.
  29. ^ Miller, Chance (2016-11-29). "Apple taps Wired Magazine's creative director to join its design team". 9to5Mac. Retrieved 2019-02-09.
  30. ^ "Wired endorses optimism". Wired. August 18, 2016.
  31. ^ "Wired.com Site Info". Alexa Internet. Retrieved March 18, 2017.
  32. ^ Jeffrey Veen, HotWired Style, 1997, p14-15.
  33. ^ "WN: Wired News". December 30, 2005. Archived from the original on December 30, 2005.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  34. ^ "Paywalls make content better, Wired editor Nick Thompson says". Recode. Retrieved March 2, 2018.
  35. ^ "Wired Nextfest". Archived from the original on April 27, 2009.
  36. ^ Moses, Lucia (July 31, 2009). "Wired Magazine Cancels NextFest". adweek.com. Adweek. Retrieved October 15, 2015.
  37. ^ "Geekipedia". Wired. February 13, 2007. Retrieved July 22, 2012.

Further reading

External links

Backchannel (blog)

Backchannel is an online magazine that publishes in-depth stories on technology-related news. Numerous prominent journalists have been recruited to write for the site, including Steven Levy, Andrew Leonard, Susan P. Crawford, Virginia Heffernan, Doug Menuez, Peter Diamandis, Jessi Hempel, and many others. In addition, Backchannel has interviewed many notable figures, such as Demis Hassabis of Google DeepMind and Orrin Hatch of the Republican Party.

Backchannel began as an in-house publication on Medium (website). In 2016, Backchannel was purchased by Condé Nast. In 2017, it was announced that Backchannel would be moving off of Medium and be hosted by Wired (magazine), while remaining editorially independent.

Bill Joy

William Nelson Joy (born November 8, 1954) is an American computer engineer. He co-founded Sun Microsystems in 1982 along with Vinod Khosla, Scott McNealy, and Andy Bechtolsheim, and served as chief scientist at the company until 2003. He played an integral role in the early development of BSD UNIX while a graduate student at Berkeley, and he is the original author of the vi text editor. He also wrote the 2000 essay Why The Future Doesn't Need Us, in which he expressed deep concerns over the development of modern technologies.

Bruce Sterling

Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author known for his novels and work on the Mirrorshades anthology. This work helped to define the cyberpunk genre.

Charles Platt (author)

Charles Platt (born 26 April 1945) is an author, journalist and computer programmer. He relocated from England to the United States during 1970, is a naturalized U.S. citizen and has one child, Rose Fox, who edits science-fiction, fantasy, and horror book reviews. Platt is the nephew of Robert Platt, Baron Platt of Grindleford.

Chris Anderson (writer)

Chris Anderson (born July 9, 1961) is a British-American author and entrepreneur. He was with The Economist for seven years before joining WIRED magazine in 2001, where he was the editor-in-chief until 2012. He is known for his 2004 article entitled The Long Tail; which he later expanded into the 2006 book, The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business Is Selling Less of More. He is the cofounder and current CEO of 3D Robotics, a drone manufacturing company.

Declan McCullagh

Declan McCullagh is an American entrepreneur, journalist, and software engineer.

He is the CEO and co-founder, with computer scientist Celine Bursztein, of Recent Media Inc., a startup in Silicon Valley that has built a recommendation engine and iOS and Android news app. Recent, which uses artificial intelligence and machine learning for its recommendation engine, was released to early users in June 2015.

He previously worked for Wired, CNET, CBS Interactive, and Time Inc.. His articles about technology have been published in Reason, Playboy, the Wall Street Journal, Communications of the ACM (co-authored with computer scientist Peter G. Neumann), and the Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy.Previously as a journalist he specialized in computer security and privacy. He is notable, among other things, for his early involvement with the media interpretation of U.S. presidential candidate Al Gore's statement that he "took the initiative in creating the Internet".

In addition to technology, McCullagh has written approvingly of free markets and individual liberty. He began writing weekly columns for CBS News entitled Other People's Money upon CBS Corporation's acquisition of CNET Networks. In August 2009, McCullagh renamed his column to Taking Liberties, which focuses on "individual rights and liberties, including both civil and economic liberties."

Esther Dyson

Esther Dyson (born 14 July 1951) is a Swiss-born American journalist, author, businesswoman, investor, commentator and philanthropist. She is a leading angel investor focused on breakthrough efficacy in healthcare, government transparency, digital technology, biotechnology, and space.

Dyson is currently focusing her career on health and continues to invest in health and technology startups.On 7 October 2008, Space Adventures announced that Dyson had paid to train as a back-up spaceflight participant for Charles Simonyi's trip to the International Space Station aboard the Soyuz TMA-14 mission which took place in 2009.

Evan Ratliff

Evan Ratliff (born c. 1976) is an American journalist and author. He is CEO and co-founder of Atavist, a media and software company. Ratliff is a contributor to Wired Magazine and The New Yorker.

Global Neighborhood Watch

"Global Neighborhood Watch" is an article by Neal Stephenson that appeared in Wired Magazine in 1998. In it he proposes a specific plan for using information technology to fight crime. According to Stephenson, he is no longer pursuing the idea.

Howard Rheingold

Howard Rheingold (born July 7, 1947) is an American critic, writer, and teacher, known for his specialties on the cultural, social and political implications of modern communication media such as the Internet, mobile telephony and virtual communities (a term he is credited with inventing).

John Heilemann

John Arthur Heilemann (born January 23, 1966) is an American journalist and national-affairs analyst for NBC News and MSNBC. With Mark Halperin, he co-authored Double Down and Game Change, books about presidential campaigning. Heilemann has formerly been a staff writer for New York, Wired, and The Economist.

Kevin Kelly (editor)

Kevin Kelly (born August 14, 1952) is the founding executive editor of Wired magazine, and a former editor/publisher of the Whole Earth Review. He has also been a writer, photographer, conservationist, and student of Asian and digital culture.

Mark Frauenfelder

Mark Frauenfelder (born December 22, 1960) is a blogger, illustrator, and journalist. He was editor-in-chief of the magazine MAKE and is co-owner of the collaborative weblog Boing Boing. Along with his wife, Carla Sinclair, he founded the Boing Boing print zine in 1988, where he acted as co-editor until the print version folded in 1997. There his work was discovered by Billy Idol, who consulted Frauenfelder for his Cyberpunk album. While designing Boing Boing and co-editing it with Sinclair, Frauenfelder became an editor at Wired from 1993–1998 and the "Living Online" columnist for Playboy magazine from 1998 to 2002. He is the co-editor of The Happy Mutant Handbook (1995, Riverhead Books), and was the author and illustrator of Mad Professor (2002, Chronicle Books). He is the author and illustrator of World's Worst (2005, Chronicle Books) and The Computer: An Illustrated History (2005, Carlton Books). He is the author of Rule the Web: How to Do Anything and Everything on the Internet—Better, Faster, Easier (2007, St. Martin's Griffin), and Made by Hand (2010, Portfolio). He was interviewed on the Colbert Report in March 2007 and in June 2010.On June 21, 2003, Mark Frauenfelder and Carla Sinclair, along with their two young daughters, decided to move from Los Angeles to Rarotonga, an island in the South Pacific, where they lived for five months. The Island Chronicles is a website about the adventures.

Mark currently works at Institute for the Future as a Research Director.

Melinda Gates

Melinda Ann Gates DBE (née French; born August 15, 1964) is an American philanthropist and a former general manager at Microsoft. In 2000, she co-founded the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the world's largest private charitable organization. Gates has consistently been ranked as one of the world's most powerful women by Forbes.

Nicholas Negroponte

Nicholas Negroponte (born December 1, 1943) is a Greek American architect. He is the founder and chairman Emeritus of Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Lab, and also founded the One Laptop per Child Association (OLPC).

Steven Levy

Steven Levy (born 1951) is an American journalist who has written several books on computers, technology, cryptography, the internet, cybersecurity, and privacy.

TAT-14

TAT-14 is the 14th consortium transatlantic telecommunications cable system. In operation from 2001, it uses wavelength division multiplexing. The cable system is built from multiple pairs of fibres—one fibre in each pair is used for data carried in one direction and the other in the opposite direction. Although optical fibre can be used in both directions simultaneously, for reliability it is better not to require splitting equipment at the end of the individual fibre to separate transmit and receive signals—hence a fibre pair is used. TAT-14 uses four pairs of fibres—two pairs as active and two as backup. Each fibre in each pair carries 16 wavelengths in one direction, and each wavelength carries up to an STM-256 (38,486,016 kbit/s as payload). The fibres are bundled into submarine cables connecting the United States and the European Union (United Kingdom, France, the Netherlands, Germany, and Denmark) in a ring topology.By the time this cable went into operation, the expected long boom (term coined by Wired magazine) was already ending in the dot-com death. The overinvestment in transcontinental optical fiber capacity led to a financial crisis in private cable operators like Global Crossing.

In the cables leak released by WikiLeaks, it is revealed that the landing point in Katwijk, the Netherlands is included in a US Government list of critical infrastructure susceptible to terrorist attack.

Webmonkey

Webmonkey was an online tutorial website composed of various articles on building webpages from backend to frontend. The site covered many aspects of developing on the web like programming, database, multimedia, and setting up web storefronts. The content presented was much like Wired magazine but for learning to design web content. Webmonkey had content applicable to both advanced users and newer internet users interested in the underlying technologies of the web.

Why The Future Doesn't Need Us

"Why The Future Doesn't Need Us" is an article written by Bill Joy (then Chief Scientist at Sun Microsystems) in the April 2000 issue of Wired magazine. In the article, he argues (quoting the sub title) that "Our most powerful 21st-century technologies—robotics, genetic engineering, and nanotech—are threatening to make humans an endangered species." Joy warns:

While some critics have characterized Joy's stance as obscurantism or neo-Luddism, others share his concerns about the consequences of rapidly expanding technology.

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