Winston Moss

Winston Moss (born December 24, 1965) is a former American football linebacker and former associate head coach and linebackers coach for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League. [1] He was drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the second round of the 1987 NFL Draft. Moss attended Miami Southridge High School and was an all-state linebacker.[2] He played college football at Miami.

Moss also played for the Los Angeles Raiders and Seattle Seahawks.

Winston Moss
Personal information
Born:December 24, 1965 (age 53)
Miami, Florida
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:245 lb (111 kg)
Career information
High school:Miami Southridge
(Miami, Florida)
College:Miami (FL)
NFL Draft:1987 / Round: 2 / Pick: 50
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Sacks:20.5
Interceptions:3
Games:169
Player stats at NFL.com

Coaching career

Moss began his coaching career in 1998 as a defensive quality control assistant for the Seattle Seahawks. He was hired by the New Orleans Saints in 2000 as defensive assistant/quality control; he was promoted to linebackers coach near the end of that season to replace John Bunting, who departed to become head coach at the University of North Carolina. Moss was hired by the Packers to become their linebackers coach on January 19, 2006. He was promoted to assistant head coach by head coach Mike McCarthy on January 15, 2007. Following a disappointing 2008 season for the Packers, Moss was the only major defensive coach not to be fired by McCarthy.[3] In 2016, Moss led the Packers' coaching staff in coaching Team Irvin in the Pro Bowl, replacing Mike McCarthy, who declined to travel to Hawaii due to illness. On December 4, 2018, just two days after McCarthy was fired as head coach, Moss was relieved of his coaching duties after thirteen seasons with the team.

References

  1. ^ Green Bay Packers Official Website December 4, 2018
  2. ^ Green Bay Packers Official Website January 9, 2013
  3. ^ "Packers fire 6 coaches, including D-coordinator". ESPN.com. January 5, 2009. Retrieved September 18, 2016.

External links

1985 Miami Hurricanes football team

The 1985 Miami Hurricanes football team represented the University of Miami during the 1985 NCAA Division I-A football season. It was the Hurricanes' 60th season of football. The Hurricanes were led by second-year head coach Jimmy Johnson and played their home games at the Orange Bowl. They finished the season 10–2 overall. They were invited to the Sugar Bowl where they lost to Tennessee, 35-7.

1987 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1987 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 38th year with the National Football League. The 49ers won the division for the second consecutive season, and ended the season as the top seed in the NFC playoffs. The season ended with an upset loss to the Minnesota Vikings in the divisional round of the playoffs.

1987 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season

The 1987 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season was the franchise's 12th season in the National Football League the 12th playing their home games at Tampa Stadium and the first under head coach Ray Perkins. It was a year of great change for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ organization in the National Football League. Perkins had only needed three seasons to build the Giants into a playoff team, and it was hoped that he would be able to repeat the feat with the Buccaneers. They impoved over their 2-14 record from 1986 and finished 4-11.

The Buccaneers possessed the first overall pick in the NFL Draft, and used it to select University of Miami quarterback Vinny Testaverde. The Buccaneers appeared changed and won four games early in the season, but they notably lost large leads in later games and fell from playoff contention after midseason. The season was marked by a 1987 players’ strike in which regular play was interrupted for a month, while NFL owners fielded teams of replacement players.

1991 Los Angeles Raiders season

The 1991 Los Angeles Raiders season was their 32nd in the National Football League (NFL). They were unable to improve upon their previous season's output of 12–4, winning only nine games. After a 9–4 start, the team lost its last three games, but did qualify for the playoffs for the second straight season. The Raiders were inconsistent offensively, with struggling quarterback Jay Schroeder eventually benched in favor of rookie Todd Marinovich. It was notable that future Hall of Famer Marcus Allen's role was restricted mainly to backing up newly acquired Roger Craig, and future All-Pro Tim Brown also played mostly as a reserve, starting only one game. The loss of Bo Jackson to a career-ending injury also clearly had an impact. A solid defense was led by Howie Long, Greg Townsend (13 sacks) and Ronnie Lott (8 interceptions).

1992 Los Angeles Raiders season

The 1992 Los Angeles Raiders season was their 33rd in the National Football League (NFL). They were unable to improve upon their previous season's output of 9–7, winning only seven games. This was the first time in three seasons the team failed to qualify for the playoffs.

1993 Los Angeles Raiders season

The 1993 Los Angeles Raiders season was the franchise's 34th season overall, and the franchise's 24th season in the National Football League. The team improved upon its 7–9 record in the previous season and returned to the NFL playoffs after a one-year absence, but lost in the AFC Divisional game to the Buffalo Bills.

This was the Raiders’ final playoff appearance in Los Angeles, and would not return to the playoffs until 2000, when the franchise returned to Oakland.

2000 New Orleans Saints season

The 2000 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 34th season in the National Football League and the 25th to host games at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. The Saints were looking to improve on their 3–13 finish from a year earlier under new head coach Jim Haslett. Not only did the Saints do so, but they finished with a 10–6 record to win the NFC West and advanced to the playoffs for the first time since 1992. They also won their first ever playoff game in franchise history by defeating the defending Super Bowl champion St. Louis Rams in the Wild Card round. The Saints went no further, though, as they lost to the Minnesota Vikings in the next round.

This was the only time the Saints made the playoffs under Haslett. For the next four seasons, the Saints fell out of contention. They would not return to the playoffs until 2006.

New wide receiver Joe Horn, quickly emerged as a star, catching 94 passes for 1,340 and 9 touchdowns, and he was selected to the Pro Bowl after the season.

2001 New Orleans Saints season

The 2001 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 35th season in the National Football League and the 26th to host games at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. The Saints failed to improve on their 11-5 record from 2000 and finishing at 7-9. Thus missing the playoffs for the first time since 1999; This meant that the team would become the seventeenth consecutive season that the team hosting the Super Bowl would not be playing in it; A feat that has not been achieved as of Super Bowl XIX.

The Saints were outscored 160-52 in their final four games.

After just three seasons with the Saints, running back Ricky Williams was traded to the Miami Dolphins during the 2002 off-season.

2002 New Orleans Saints season

The 2002 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 36th season in the National Football League and the 27th to host games at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. They improved upon their previous season's performance of 7–9, winning nine games. Despite the winning season, and ranking third in total offense in 2002, the team failed to qualify for the playoffs. A bright moment during the season for the Saints was sweeping eventual champion Tampa Bay. The 2 wins were almost guaranteed to make New Orleans a playoff team. However, 3 consecutive losses, including one to 1-13 Cincinnati, knocked New Orleans out of playoff contention.

2003 New Orleans Saints season

The 2003 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 37th season in the National Football League and the 28th to host games at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. They failed to improve on their 9-7 record from 2002 and finished with a record of 8–8. This was the season of the River City Relay, a play that has gone down in NFL lore from a week 16 game against the Jacksonville Jaguars. The Saints were 7-7 and needed a victory to keep their postseason hopes alive. The Jaguars held a 20–13 lead with seven seconds left in regulation, and the Saints had possession on their own 25. In a scene evoking memories of The Play, Aaron Brooks passed to Donté Stallworth for 42 yards, Stallworth lateraled to Michael Lewis for 7 yards, Lewis lateraled to Deuce McAllister for 5 yards, and McAllister lateraled to Jerome Pathon for 21 yards and a touchdown. The score was 20–19, leaving only the extra point to force overtime. However, in an unlikely twist, John Carney, who in his career made 98.4% of extra points attempted and had not missed one in a full decade, inexplicably missed the kick wide right, causing the Saints to miss the playoffs for the third straight season.

2004 New Orleans Saints season

The 2004 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 38th as a member of the National Football League (NFL). They matched their previous season's output of 8–8, and the team finished the season on a four-game winning streak, which was all the more remarkable because the Saints trailed at some point during every game. The 1978 Atlanta Falcons and the 2002 Cleveland Browns come closest to this record, winning eight games out of fifteen where they trailed at some point.

2005 New Orleans Saints season

The 2005 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 39th season in the National Football League.

The season began with the team trying to improve from their 8–8 record from 2004. The Saints played two preseason games in the Louisiana Superdome before being forced to evacuate New Orleans due to Hurricane Katrina.

They were forced to play the rest of the season on the road, splitting their games between their temporary headquarters at San Antonio’s Alamodome, and LSU’s Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge, and even playing their first home game at Giants Stadium.

The season ended with a 3–13 record, their equal-worst record alongside 1996 and 1999 since their 1–15 1980 season, and the firing of Jim Haslett. He was replaced by current head coach Sean Payton the following 2006 season.

2016 Pro Bowl

The 2016 Pro Bowl (branded as the 2016 Pro Bowl presented by USAA for sponsorship reasons) was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2015 season, which was played at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii on January 31, 2016.

Andy Reid of the Kansas City Chiefs and Mike McCarthy of the Green Bay Packers were selected to coach the teams due to their teams being the highest seeded teams from each conference to lose in the Divisional Round of 2015–16 NFL playoffs, which has been the convention since the 2010 Pro Bowl. On January 27, Mike McCarthy announced that he would not be coaching the Pro Bowl due to an illness and also announced that assistant head coach Winston Moss would take over head coaching duties. This was also the sixth consecutive year that the Pro Bowl took place prior to the Super Bowl. At the Pro Bowl Draft, the Chiefs' coaching staff was assigned to Team Rice, and the Packers' coaching staff was assigned to Team Irvin.The game continued the fantasy draft format that debuted with the 2014 Pro Bowl. The two teams were to be drafted and captained by two Hall of Famers, Jerry Rice (winning 2014 Pro Bowl captain) and Michael Irvin (winning 2015 Pro Bowl captain). Darren Woodson and Eric Davis served as defensive co-captains for Irvin and Rice respectively, in both cases reuniting two former teammates (Irvin and Woodson were teammates on the Dallas Cowboys from 1992 to 1999, while Rice and Davis played together with the San Francisco 49ers from 1990 to 1995). The Fantasy draft was held January 27 at 7:30 P.M. EST on ESPN2 at Wheeler Army Airfield in Wahiawa, Hawaii as part of an extension to the NFL's military appreciation campaign.

Barney Miller (season 3)

This is a list of episodes from the third season of Barney Miller.

List of Green Bay Packers Pro Bowl selections

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. They are currently members of the North Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL), and are the third-oldest franchise in the NFL. The team has had representatives to the Pro Bowl every year since 1950 except for nine seasons. Below is a list of the Pro Bowl selections for each season.

Miami Southridge High School

Miami Southridge Senior High School is a secondary school located at 19355 SW 114 Avenue in Miami, Florida, USA (in the South Miami Heights area). Its current principal is Humberto J. Miret. The school serves ninth through twelfth grade students in a mostly unincorporated suburban and rural area in the southern stretches of Miami-Dade County between South Miami and Homestead.

Southridge's athletic rival is Miami Palmetto Senior High School.

Scott McCurley

Scott McCurley was the Defensive Quality Control Coach for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League.

Steve Largent Award

The Steve Largent Award is given by the Seattle Seahawks annually to the team contributor(s) best exemplifying the spirit, dedication, and integrity of former Seahawk wide receiver Steve Largent.

The Jacksons (TV series)

The Jacksons is an American variety show featuring the Jackson siblings (except for Jermaine, who was signed to Motown while the Jackson group was signed to the Epic/CBS record label). It was the first variety show where the entire cast were siblings. As with the Jackson 5 regular performances, Michael Jackson was the lead performer in musical and dance performances.

The thirty-minute Wednesday evening show began airing on CBS as a summer 1976 show and it continued into the 1976–1977 season, finishing on March 9, 1977 after running for 12 episodes.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.