Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council

Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council is the local authority of the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead in Berkshire, England. It is a unitary authority council, having the powers of a non-metropolitan county and district council combined. Windsor and Maidenhead is divided into 23 wards, electing 57 councillors.[1] The council was created by the Local Government Act 1972 and replaced six local authorities: Cookham Rural District Council, Eton Urban District Council, Eton Rural District Council, Maidenhead Borough Council, New Windsor Borough Council and Windsor Rural District Council. Since 1 April 1998 it has been a unitary authority, assuming the powers and functions of Berkshire County Council.

Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council
Type
Type
History
Founded1 April 1974
Leadership
Mayor of the Royal borough of Windsor & Maidenhead
Cllr John Lenton
since 23 May 2017
Leader of the Council
Cllr Simon Dudley, Conservative
since 24 May 2016
Managing director
Duncan Sharkey
since 28th January 2019
Structure
Seats41 councillors
  : 23 seats   : 9 seats   : 9 seats
Political groups
Administration (23)
     Conservative (23)
Other parties (18)
     Liberal Democrats (9)
     OWRA (5)
     Independent (4)
Length of term
4 years
Elections
Plurality-at-large
Last election
7 May 2015
Next election
2 May 2019
Meeting place
Town Hall at Maidenhead
Town Hall, Maidenhead
Website
www.rbwm.gov.uk

History

The authority was formed as the Windsor and Maidenhead District Council. It replaced Cookham Rural District Council, Eton Urban District Council, Eton Rural District Council, Maidenhead Borough Council, New Windsor Borough Council and Windsor Rural District Council. The current local authority was first elected in 1973, a year before formally coming into its powers and prior to the creation of the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead on 1 April 1974. The council gained borough status, entitling it to be known as Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council.

It was envisaged through the Local Government Act 1972 that Windsor and Maidenhead as a non-metropolitan district council would share power with the Berkshire County Council. This arrangement lasted until 1998 when Berkshire County Council was abolished and Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council gained responsibility for services that had been provided by the county council.

Political control

Since 1973 political control of the council has been held by the following parties:[2]

Party in control Years
Conservative 1973–1991
No overall control 1991–1995
Liberal Democrats 1995–1997
No overall control 1997–2003
Liberal Democrats 2003–2007
Conservative 2007–present

References

  1. ^ http://www.rbwm.gov.uk/web/members_index.htm
  2. ^ "Windsor & Maidenhead Royal". BBC News Online. Retrieved 24 March 2010.
2000 Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council election

The 2000 Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council election took place on 4 May 2000 to elect members of Windsor and Maidenhead Unitary Council in Berkshire, England. The whole council was up for election and the Liberal Democrats lost overall control of the council to no overall control.

2003 Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council election

The 2003 Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council election took place on 1 May 2003 to elect members of Windsor and Maidenhead Unitary Council in Berkshire, England. The whole council was up for election with boundary changes since the last election in 2000 reducing the number of seats by 1. The Liberal Democrats gained overall control of the council from no overall control.

2007 Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council election

The 2007 Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council election took place on 3 May 2007 to elect members of Windsor and Maidenhead Unitary Council in Berkshire, England. The whole council was up for election and the Conservative party gained overall control of the council from the Liberal Democrats.

2011 Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council election

Elections to Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council were held on 5 May 2011. The whole council was up for election and the Conservative party retained its overall control of the council. The previous election was held in 2007.

2015 Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council election

The 2015 Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council election took place on 7 May 2015 to elect all members of the council of the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead in England. This was on the same day as other local elections and coincided with the 2015 United Kingdom general election.

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Old Windsor Residents' Association

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Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead

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Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council elections

Windsor and Maidenhead is a unitary authority in Berkshire, England. Until 1 April 1998 it was a non-metropolitan district.

Districts
Councils
Local elections
Local authorities in Berkshire

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