Windows System Resource Manager

Windows System Resource Manager (WSRM) is a component of Windows Server operating systems that enables the allocation of resources, including CPU and memory resources, among multiple applications based on business priorities. An administrator sets targets for the amount of hardware resources that running applications or users are allowed to consume. It can allocate resources among multiple applications on a server according to defined policies. This can be helpful in a corporate environment when, for example, a well-behaved app has to co-exist with an application that has a memory leak. Without protection such as afforded by WSRM, the app runs more slowly and eventually crashes, because the misbehaving app eventually causes problems that affect every app that shares its memory space. With WSRM, an app can be limited to an isolated subset of hardware resources. As a result of this, the bad effects caused by the memory leak is limited to that subset.

WSRM is deprecated starting with Windows Server 2012. Microsoft recommends the use of Hyper-V as an alternative that provides similar functionality.[1]

Windows System Resource Manager
Developer(s)Microsoft
Operating systemWindows Server
Replaced byHyper-V

See also

References

  1. ^ "Features Removed or Deprecated in Windows Server 2012". TechNet. Microsoft. Retrieved 30 April 2014.
Remote Desktop Services

Remote Desktop Services (RDS), known as Terminal Services in Windows Server 2008 and earlier, is one of the components of Microsoft Windows that allow a user to take control of a remote computer or virtual machine over a network connection. RDS is Microsoft's implementation of thin client, where Windows software, and the entire desktop of the computer running RDS, are made accessible to a remote client machine that supports Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP). With RDS, only software user interfaces are transferred to the client system. All input from the client system is transmitted to the server, where software execution takes place. This is in contrast to application streaming systems, like Microsoft App-V, in which computer programs are streamed to the client on-demand and executed on the client machine.

RemoteFX was added to RDS as part of Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1.

WSRM

WSRM may refer to:

WSRM (FM), a radio station licensed to Rome, Georgia, United States

Welsh Socialist Republican Movement

Windows System Resource Manager

WS-ReliableMessaging, a network protocol

Windows Internal Database

Windows Internal Database (codenamed WYukon, sometimes referred to as SQL Server Embedded Edition) is a variant of SQL Server Express 2005–2014 that is included with Windows Server 2008 (SQL 2005), Windows Server 2008 R2 (SQL 2005), Windows Server 2012 (SQL 2012), Windows Server 2012 R2 (SQL 2012) and Windows Server 2016 (SQL 2014) and is included with other free Microsoft products released after 2007 that require an SQL Server database backend. Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 and Windows Server Update Services 3.0 both include Windows Internal Database, which can be used as an alternative to using a retail edition of SQL Server. WID was a 32-bit application, even as a component of Windows Server 2008 64-bit, which installs in the path C:\Windows\sysmsi\ssee\ In Windows Server 2012 and later, it is a 64-bit application, installed in C:\Windows\WID.

Windows Internal Database is not available as a standalone product for use by end-user applications; Microsoft provides SQL Server Express and Microsoft SQL Server for this purpose. Additionally, it is designed to only be accessible to Windows Services running on the same machine.

Several components of Windows Server 2008 and 2012 use Windows Internal Database for their data storage: Active Directory Rights Management Services, Windows System Resource Manager, UDDI Services, Active Directory Federation Services 2.0, IPAM and Windows SharePoint Services. On Windows Server 2003, SharePoint and Windows Server Update Services will install Windows Internal Database and use it as a default data store if a retail SQL Server database instance is not provided. A Knowledge Base article published by Microsoft states that Windows Internal Database does not identify itself as a removable component, and provides instructions how it may be uninstalled by calling Windows Installer directly.SQL Server Management Studio Express can be used to connect to an instance of Windows Internal Database using \\.\pipe\MSSQL$MICROSOFT##SSEE\sql\query (2003–2008) or \\.\pipe\MICROSOFT##WID\tsql\query (2012) as instance name. But this will only work locally, as Remote Connections cannot be enabled for this edition of SQL Server. Also note that "Windows Authentication" should be used (as opposed to SQL Server Authentication), and administrators seem to have the best results of authenticating successfully when logged on using the same administrative account that was created when Windows was installed.

Windows Server 2008

Windows Server 2008 is a server operating system produced by Microsoft. It was released to manufacturing on February 4, 2008, and reached general availability on February 27, 2008. It is the successor of Windows Server 2003, released nearly five years earlier.

Management
tools
Apps
Shell
Services
File systems
Server
Architecture
Security
Compatibility
API
Games
Discontinued
Spun off to
Microsoft Store

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