Willis Hudlin

George Willis Hudlin (May 23, 1906 – August 5, 2002) was born in Wagoner, Oklahoma, and was a Major League Baseball pitcher for, most notably, the Cleveland Indians from 1926 to 1940. Hudlin didn't pitch more than 10 games with any other team, although he played with 3 others.

In 1940, Hudlin became one of the few players to compete on 4 different major league teams in the same year (Cleveland Indians, Washington Senators, St. Louis Browns, and the New York Giants). His career statistics include a 158–156 record, with a 4.41 ERA. He had 677 strikeouts in 2613 career innings pitched. Hudlin was the pitcher who gave up Babe Ruth's 500th home run.

Hudlin was a very good hitting pitcher in his career, recording a .201 batting average (180-for-894) with 76 runs, 5 home runs and 69 RBI.

His pitch selection included a well-known sinker, a fastball, curveball and a changeup. He occasionally threw sidearm or with an underhand "dip of the wrist", though he threw overhand most often.[1] After Hudlin finished playing in the majors, he was a manager for the minor league Little Rock Travelers and pitching coach for the Detroit Tigers under skippers Jack Tighe, Bill Norman and Jimmy Dykes (1957–59).

He later became a scout for the New York Yankees where he scouted his own son James Hudlin who was given a contract to play professionally, but was drafted to fight in the Vietnam War. James Hudlin's pitch selection was a knuckleball, slider, curveball, and sinker, as well as a two-seam fastball that topped out at 102 mph.

Willis died in Little Rock, Arkansas at the age of 96.

Willis Hudlin
WillisHudlinGoudeycard
Pitcher
Born: May 23, 1906
Wagoner, Oklahoma
Died: August 5, 2002 (aged 96)
Little Rock, Arkansas
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 15, 1926, for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
August 31, 1944, for the St. Louis Browns
MLB statistics
Win–loss record158–156
Earned run average4.41
Strikeouts677
Teams
Career highlights and awards
  • 18 wins in 1927

References

  1. ^ The Neyer/James Guide to Pitchers: An Historical Compendium of Pitching, Pitchers, and Pitches. Bill James and Rob Neyer. 2004.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
n/a
Detroit Tigers pitching coach
1957–1959
Succeeded by
Tom Ferrick
1926 Cleveland Indians season

The 1926 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 88–66, 3 games behind the New York Yankees.

1927 Cleveland Indians season

The 1927 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 66–87, 43½ games behind the New York Yankees.

1928 Cleveland Indians season

The 1928 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the American League with a record of 62–92, 39 games behind the New York Yankees.

1929 Cleveland Indians season

The 1929 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 81–71, 24 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1930 Cleveland Indians season

The 1930 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 81–73, 21 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1931 Cleveland Indians season

The 1931 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record 78–76, 30 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1932 Cleveland Indians season

The 1932 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 87–65, 19 games behind the New York Yankees.

1933 Cleveland Indians season

The 1933 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 75–76, 23½ games behind the Washington Senators.

1934 Cleveland Indians season

The 1934 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 85–69, 16 games behind the Detroit Tigers.

1936 Cleveland Indians season

The 1936 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the American League with a record of 80–74, 22½ games behind the New York Yankees.

1937 Cleveland Indians season

The 1937 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 83–71, 19 games behind the New York Yankees.

1938 Cleveland Indians season

The 1938 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 86–66, 13 games behind the New York Yankees.

1939 Cleveland Indians season

The 1939 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 86–66, 13 games behind the New York Yankees.

1940 Cleveland Indians season

The 1940 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American major league baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 89–65, one game behind the Detroit Tigers. Had the Indians finished ahead of the Tigers, The Indians would have played their cross state National League rivals, the National League Champion Cincinnati Reds, in the World Series. The World Series would have been the only all Ohio World series. The season is infamous for ten Indian players confronting owner Alva Bradley and demanding the removal of manager Ossie Vitt, saying the man's behavior was harming the team. When the news broke, the public sided with Vitt and the Indians were dismissed as "crybabies." The movement has since been named the "Crybaby Mutiny."

1940 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1940 New York Giants season was the franchise's 58th season. The team finished in sixth place in the National League with a 72-80 record, 37½ games behind the Cincinnati Reds.

1940 St. Louis Browns season

The 1940 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 6th in the American League with a record of 67 wins and 87 losses.

1940 Washington Senators season

The 1940 Washington Senators won 64 games, lost 90, and finished in seventh place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1944 St. Louis Browns season

The 1944 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Browns finishing first in the American League with a record of 89 wins and 65 losses. In the World Series, they lost to the team they shared a stadium with, the Cardinals, four games to two.

Stan Coveleski

Stanley Anthony Coveleski (born Stanislaus Kowalewski, July 13, 1889 – March 20, 1984) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for four American League (AL) teams between 1912 and 1928, primarily the Cleveland Indians. The star of the Indians pitching staff, he won over 20 games each year from the epidemic-shortened 1918 season through 1921, leading the AL in shutouts twice and in strikeouts and earned run average (ERA) once each during his nine years with the club. The star of the 1920 World Series, he led the Indians to their first championship with three complete-game victories, including a 3–0 shutout in the Game 7 finale. Traded to the Washington Senators after the 1924 season, he helped that club to its second AL pennant in a row with 20 victories against only 5 losses, including a 13-game winning streak, while again leading the league in ERA.

Coveleski followed in the footsteps of his brother Harry as a major league pitcher. But after making his debut with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1912, he was sidetracked by three more seasons in the minor leagues before joining the Indians in 1916, and won only thirteen major league games before turning 27. Coveleski specialized in throwing the spitball, where the pitcher alters the ball with a foreign substance such as chewing tobacco. It was legal when his career began but prohibited in 1920, with Coveleski being one of 17 pitchers permitted to continue throwing the pitch. In 450 career games, Coveleski pitched 3,082 innings and posted a record of 215–142, with 224 complete games, 38 shutouts, and a 2.89 ERA. He set Cleveland records of 172 wins, 2,502⅓ innings and 305 starts, which were later broken by Mel Harder and Willis Hudlin. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.