Willie Roaf

William Layton Roaf (born April 18, 1970), nicknamed "Nasty,"[1] is a former American football offensive tackle who played in the National Football League (NFL) for thirteen seasons. He played college football for Louisiana Tech University, where he earned consensus All-American honors. He was a first-round pick in the 1993 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the New Orleans Saints and Kansas City Chiefs of the NFL. An eleven-time Pro Bowl selection and nine-time All-Pro, he was enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2012 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 2014.

Willie Roaf
refer to caption
Roaf in February 2008
No. 77
Position:Offensive tackle
Personal information
Born:April 18, 1970 (age 48)
Pine Bluff, Arkansas
Height:6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Weight:320 lb (145 kg)
Career information
High school:Pine Bluff (Pine Bluff, Arkansas)
College:Louisiana Tech
NFL Draft:1993 / Round: 1 / Pick: 8
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:189
Games started:189
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Roaf was born in Pine Bluff, Arkansas.[2] He graduated from Pine Bluff High School,[3] where he played for the Pine Bluff Zebras high school football and basketball teams. He was lightly recruited out of high school, and even considered pursuing basketball instead of football in college.

Football career

Roaf received an athletic scholarship to attend Louisiana Tech University, where he had an outstanding career for the Louisiana Tech Bulldogs football team from 1989 to 1992. Known for his blocking ability and his considerable speed for his size, he was recognized as a consensus first-team All-American, and was also a finalist in his senior year for the Outland Trophy for the best offensive lineman in college.[4]

Professional career

He began his professional football career with the NFL's New Orleans Saints, who drafted him with the eighth pick of the first round in the 1993 draft.[5] The draft pick was acquired from the Detroit Lions for the rights to Pat Swilling.[6] Roaf played nine seasons for the Saints;[7] he was named to seven Pro Bowls, and won a spot on both the NFL 1990s All-Decade Team and the 2000s All-Decade Team, making him the most awarded player in Saints history.[4] Roaf suffered a season-ending injury in 2001 and then was traded to the Kansas City Chiefs in March 2002 for a conditional draft choice. He played four more seasons with the Chiefs, and was selected for the Pro Bowl in each of those four years, for a total of 11 Pro Bowl selections.[4] His election to the Pro Football Hall of Fame was announced on February 4, 2012.

On July 28, 2006, Roaf told the Kansas City Star that he was retiring from football. General manager Carl Peterson said he was holding out hope that Roaf would reverse his decision, but Roaf said he was "solid" on retirement.[8] In 2009 Roaf took his first coaching job, as the offensive line coach at Santa Monica College in Santa Monica, California.[9]

Roaf has been elected to sports halls of fame for Louisiana Tech Athletics (2003), Arkansas (in 2007),[10] Louisiana (in 2009),[4][11] and the New Orleans Saints (in 2008).[12] He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame on February 4, 2012, in his second year of eligibility.[13] Roaf was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2014.

Personal life

Roaf was born in Pine Bluff, Arkansas and attended Pine Bluff High School. His father was a dentist[4] and his mother, Andree Layton Roaf, was the first black woman to serve on the Arkansas Supreme Court.[14][15] Reared Episcopalian, his sister Phoebe is the Episcopal Bishop for the Diocese of West Tennessee. Roaf married Angela Hernandez, now known as Angela Hernandez Roaf, on December 10, 2013.

References

  1. ^ Damon Hack, "The Fall Hunt Is On at Arrowhead," New York Times (September 5, 2004). Retrieved February 15, 2012.
  2. ^ National Football League, Historical Players, Willie Roaf. Retrieved February 15, 2012.
  3. ^ databaseFootball.com, Players, Willie Roaf Archived March 2, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved February 15, 2012.
  4. ^ a b c d e Sheldon Mickles, "Roaf ruled the line," The Advocate (June 21, 2009).
  5. ^ Pro Football Hall of Fame, Draft History, Willie Roaf. Retrieved February 15, 2012.
  6. ^ Peter King, "Inside The NFL Draft," CNNSI (May 3, 1993).
  7. ^ Pro-Football-Reference.com, Players, Willie Roaf. Retrieved February 15, 2012.
  8. ^ Len Pasquarelli,"Chiefs Pro Bowl tackle Roaf retires", ESPN.com, July 28, 2006
  9. ^ "Willie Roaf brings expertise to Area Combine: Former Chiefs tackle to coach linemen", Amarillo Globe-News, May 17, 2009.
  10. ^ "Willie Roaf" at Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame website (retrieved July 4, 2009).
  11. ^ Brian Allee-Walsh, "Ex-New Orleans Saints tackle Willie Roaf to make stop at the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame", The Times-Picayune, June 20, 2009
  12. ^ Mike Triplett, "Roaf chosen for Saints' Hall of Fame", The Times-Picayune, May 21, 2008.
  13. ^ "Class of 2011 finalists". Pro Football HOF. January 9, 2011. Archived from the original on November 15, 2011. Retrieved November 15, 2011.
  14. ^ "Andree Yvonne Layton Roaf (1941–)" at Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture (retrieved July 1, 2009).
  15. ^ "Andree Layton Roaf, first black woman to serve on Arkansas Supreme Court, dies at 68", Associated Press at KFSM-TV website, July 1, 2009.
1993 NFL Draft

The 1993 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 25–26, 1993, at the Marriot Marquis in New York City, New York. No teams chose to claim any players in the supplemental draft that year, but the New York Giants and Kansas City Chiefs forfeited their first and second round picks, respectively, due to selecting Dave Brown and Darren Mickell in the 1992 supplemental draft.

1993 New Orleans Saints season

The 1993 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 27th as a member of the National Football League (NFL). They were unable to match their previous season's output of 12–4, winning only eight games, despite starting the season 5–0. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the first time in four years.

Quarterback Bobby Hebert, who was the Saints' starter from late 1985 through 1992, save for a season-long holdout in 1990, signed as a free agent with the division rival Atlanta Falcons. Wade Wilson, who had fallen out of favor with the Minnesota Vikings after the hiring of coach Dennis Green in 1992, was signed as Hebert's replacement.During a loss to the New York Giants on Monday Night Football, fans in the Louisiana Superdome let out a sarcastic cheer when Wilson was injured. The incident enraged coach Jim Mora, who let loose with a tirade during his post-game press conference.

1994 All-Pro Team

The 1994 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1994. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1994 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

1994 New Orleans Saints season

The 1994 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 28th as a member of the National Football League (NFL). They were unable to match their previous season's output of 8–8, winning only seven games. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the second straight year.

1996 All-Pro Team

The 1996 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1996. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1996 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008. In 1996 the AP added a new position, that of "Fullback", a primarily blocking position.

1997 All-Pro Team

The 1997 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1997. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1997 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

1999 New Orleans Saints season

The 1999 New Orleans Saints season was the Saints' thirty-third NFL season. This was Mike Ditka's third and final season as the Saints' head coach, as he was fired, along with his entire coaching staff and general manager Bill Kuharich, three days after the conclusion of the season.

During 1999, the Saints became the first team to lose to the expansion Cleveland Browns and in the process became the only team since the NFL/AFL merger in 1970 to lose to the last winless team in successive seasons.

2002 All-Pro Team

The 2002 All-Pro Team comprises the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2002. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2002 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008. In 2001 the AP did not have a separate “fullback” position. Also, in 2001, the AP returned to choosing two inside linebackers, rather than one.

2002 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 2002 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 33rd season in the National Football League, the 43rd overall, the franchise's 40th season in Kansas City, Missouri and the second under head coach Dick Vermeil.

The Chiefs's high-powered offense was led by quarterback Trent Green and 2002 NFL Offensive Player of the Year Priest Holmes, in the second of Holmes's three consecutive all-pro seasons. Green had a 2-to-1 touchdown-to-interception ratio (26 to 13), and Holmes led the league in touchdowns (24) and overall scoring (144 points).

Kansas City scored 467 points (29.2 per game), but gave up 399 points (24.9 per game), the second most in the AFC and fifth-most in the NFL. Football Outsiders stated that the 2002 Chiefs have the second-largest Offense-Defense imbalance from 1992–2010 (the largest discrepancy coming from the 1992 Seattle Seahawks). Football Outsiders also calculated that the Chiefs had the second most efficient running game in the same period (second only to the 2000 St. Louis Rams).The Chiefs' offense also set two new NFL records with the fewest fumbles in a season (7, broken in 2010) and fewest fumbles lost in a season (2), the latter of which still stands.

2003 All-Pro Team

The 2003 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2003. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2003 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

2003 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 2003 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 34th season in the National Football League, the 44th overall and the third under head coach Dick Vermeil.

The season resulted in a 13–3 winning record, beginning with a nine-game winning streak—the franchise's best start in their 40-year history. The Chiefs won the AFC West and clinched the second seed in the playoffs. Kansas City lost in an offensive shootout at home in the AFC Divisional Playoffs to the Indianapolis Colts 38–31, a game noted for involving no punts from either team's kicking squad.

The season is best remembered for the Chiefs' record-breaking offense. On December 28, running back Priest Holmes broke Marshall Faulk's single-season rushing touchdown record by scoring his 27th rushing touchdown against the Chicago Bears. Quarterback Trent Green threw for 4,000 yards and kick returner Dante Hall returned four kicks for touchdowns. However, the weak Chiefs defense would prove to be too big of weakness, as they failed to stop the Colts in the 2003-04 playoffs.

2004 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 2004 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 45th season, their 42nd in Kansas City, and 35th in the National Football League.

The 2004 season proved not to be as successful as the team's previous season. Though the Chiefs finished the regular season with the most yards and the second highest amount of points, they also had a losing record of 7–9 and no playoff appearance. In fact, the Chiefs' 483 points-scored was the highest total in NFL history for a team that finished the season with a losing record.

2005 All-Pro Team

The 2005 All-Pro Team was composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2005. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2005 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice which continued through 2008.

Andree Layton Roaf

Andree Layton Roaf (March 31, 1941 – July 1, 2009) was an Arkansas lawyer and jurist. She was the first African-American woman to serve on the Arkansas Supreme Court, and is the mother of former NFL offensive lineman Willie Roaf.

Bill Kuharich

Bill Kuharich is an American professional football executive, specializing in player-personnel (i.e., evaluating and selecting players); he has also held the General Manager position. Kuharich is the son of Joe Kuharich, former college and NFL head coach. He attended Middlebury College graduating in 1976 with a degree in History, and received a master's degree in education from St. Lawrence University. He also attended Deerfield Academy, Malvern Preparatory School and Waldron Academy.

In the mid-1980s, Kuharich was Assistant General Manager/Director of Player Personnel for the Philadelphia/Baltimore Stars of the United States Football League. The team won the USFL championship two out of the three years the league existed.

Kuharich worked in multiple capacities for the New Orleans Saints, from 1986 to 1999, as: Director of Player Personnel (1986–1993); Vice President of Football Operations (1994–1995); Executive Vice President/General Manager (1996); and, President/General Manager/Chief Operating Officer (1997–1999). During his tenure, the team acquired (eventual) Pro Bowl-grade players such as Willie Roaf, Sammy Knight, and La'Roi Glover.

As the Kansas City Chiefs' Pro Personnel Director (2000-2005), Kuharich helped orchestrate the acquisitions of Priest Holmes, Eddie Kennison, Trent Green and (eventual Pro Football Hall of Famer), Willie Roaf. Kuharich was promoted to Vice-President of Player Personnel in 2006; between 2006 and 2008, they acquired standouts like Tamba Hali; Dwayne Bowe; Brandon Flowers; Jamaal Charles, and Brandon Carr. Kuharich was released by the Chiefs on April 29, 2009.

On February 11, 2014, Kuharich was hired by the Cleveland Browns to advise first-time General Manager Ray Farmer on player-personnel. Farmer had worked under Kuharich when both were with the Chiefs.

On May 20, 2014, Kuharich was named Executive Chief of staff by the Cleveland Browns. Kuharich plays a pivotal role in the organization's personnel's moves, including the college and pro scouting departments, serving as a key cog in all facets of the Brown' process of evaluating and acquiring talent. He will also assist GM Ray Farmer in key decisions in the team's overall strategic vision as well as decisions involving NFL league matters.

Jupiter Farms, Florida

Jupiter Farms is a community in Palm Beach County, Florida, United States. Jupiter Farms, locally known as "The Farms", is located west of Florida's Turnpike on Indiantown Road (County Road 706), the major highway through the community. The exact population is unknown. In 2010 the population was approximately 12,000. "The Farms" is composed of roughly 15 square miles (39 km2) of land and has property sizes ranging from 1 acre (4,000 m2) to 152 acres (600,000 m2).

National Football League 1990s All-Decade Team

The NFL 1990s All-Decade Team was chosen by voters of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The team was composed of outstanding performers in the National Football League in the 1990s.The squad consists of first- and second-team offensive, defensive and special teams units, as well as a first- and second-team head coaches. Only a person's performance in the 1990s was used as criteria for voting.Bruce Matthews, Jerry Rice, Barry Sanders, Bruce Smith and Reggie White were unanimous choices. Deion Sanders and Mel Gray were the only players to make the team at two positions. Sanders was named first-team cornerback and punt returner while Gray made the second team as both a kick and punt returner. Morten Andersen, Gary Anderson, Sean Landeta, Ronnie Lott, Gary Zimmerman, Rice, Bruce Smith, and White were first named to the 1980s All-Decade Team. Larry Allen, Warren Sapp, and Willie Roaf were also named to the 2000s All-Decade Team.

Roaf

Roaf may refer to:

Romanian Air ForcePeople surnamed Roaf:

Andree Layton Roaf (1941–2009), member of Arkansas Supreme Court

Michael Roaf (contemporary), British orientalist

Susan Roaf (born 1950s), British Professor of Architectural Engineering

Willie Roaf (born 1970), American football player

Tarik Glenn

Tarik Glenn (born May 25, 1976) is a former American football offensive tackle. He played college football for California, and was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts in the first round (19th overall) of the 1997 NFL draft. Glenn was a part of the Super Bowl XLI-winning Colts team, beating the Chicago Bears, and made three Pro Bowls during his 10-year career.

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