William Henry Dietz

William Henry "Lone Star" Dietz (August 17, 1884 – July 20, 1964) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Washington State University (1915–1917), Purdue University (1921), Louisiana Tech University (1922–1923), University of Wyoming (1924–1926), Haskell Institute—now Haskell Indian Nations University (1929–1932), and Albright College (1937–1942). From 1933 to 1934, Dietz was the head coach of the National Football League's Boston Redskins, where he tallied a mark of 11–11–2. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 2012.

Dietz's true identity remains controversial. Although he is recognized as an "Indian athlete" by Dan Snyder, owner of the Washington Redskins, Indian Country Today Media Network ran a series of articles in 2004 exposing Dietz as a white man masquerading as an Indian.[1] In 1988, the National Congress of American Indians attempted to meet and discuss the issue with the team's former owner, Jack Kent Cooke, but Cooke refused a meeting.

William Henry Dietz
101 dietz carlisle
Dietz, as a member of the Carlisle football team between 1909 and 1912
Biographical details
BornAugust 17, 1884
Rice Lake, Wisconsin
DiedJuly 20, 1964 (aged 79)
Reading, Pennsylvania
Playing career
Football
1909–1912Carlisle
Position(s)Tackle
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1915–1917Washington State
1921Purdue
1922–1923Louisiana Tech
1924–1926Wyoming
1929–1932Haskell
1933–1934Boston Redskins
1936Ole Miss (assistant)
1937–1942Albright
Baseball
1923Louisiana Tech
Head coaching record
Overall96–62–8 (college football)
16–6 (college baseball)
11–11–2 (NFL)
Bowls1–0
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 PCC (1917)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2012 (profile)

Playing career

Dietz played at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, with teammate Jim Thorpe, under famed coach Pop Warner.[2]

Coaching career

George Preston Marshall, owner and founder of the Boston Braves, sought to rename the franchise in 1933 after leaving the stadium the team had shared with the baseball team of the same name. Marshall was said to have named the Redskins in honor of Dietz, who claimed to be of the Sioux Nation, by analogy with the Red Sox who shared the team's new home, Fenway Park.[3] A 1933 news article quotes Marshall as saying he named the team because of real Indians on the team. However, Marshall is only talking about why he specifically chose Redskins. Dietz was hired before the name change and is cited in many articles and by Marshall as being a reason he kept the Native American theme when changing the team name.[4][5]

Recognition

Dietz was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2012.

Personal life

Historian Linda M. Waggoner has traced Dietz' heritage in several articles in Indian Country Today Media Network and at a 2013 symposium at the National Museum of the American Indian. According to census records and to his birth certificate,[6] he was born William Henry Dietz, or "Willie," on August 17, 1884, in Rice Lake, Wisconsin, at 16 West Humbird Street. His father William Wallace Dietz, settled in the area in 1871 and was elected county sheriff in 1877. He married Leanna Ginder in November 1879. "Willie" attended Oklahoma's Chilocco Indian Agricultural School, where it is likely he feigned some kind of Indian identity for the first time. As Waggoner wrote, "Naturally, visitors to the St. Louis World's Fair exhibit, including Dietz's future wife, Winnebago artist Angel De Cora (1871–1919), thought Dietz was a Chilocco student."[7]

In 1921, Dietz took a coaching position with Purdue University in Indiana. After Angel De Cora died in 1919, he married Doris O. Pottlitzer, a middle-aged local journalist, on January 29, 1922. The week previous to their marriage, Purdue officials fired him for illegal recruiting. In spring 1933, George Preston Marshall, owner of the Boston Braves, hired Dietz to replace Coach Lud Wray. In 1937, the team moved to Washington, D.C.[8]

For the rest of his life, Dietz continued to promote himself as Lone Star Dietz, the son of W.W. and Julia One Star of Pine Ridge. He took on his last coaching job in 1937 for Albright College in Pennsylvania; in 1964, still married to Doris, Dietz died in Reading, Pennsylvania. He and Doris were so poor that former teammates purchased his headstone. It reads: "William ‘Lone Star’ Dietz born in South Dakota."[9]

Nickname

Dietz named himself "Lone Star" after James One Star, the alleged nephew of an Oglala Buffalo Bill Performer sometime after the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair. "Lone Star" and "One Star" are the same name in Oglala.

Contested heritage

Dietz's Indian heritage was first contested in 1916 after former neighbors who settled on the Pacific Coast heard he was posing as an Indian. In December 1918 the Federal Bureau of Investigation looked into his heritage after he fraudulently registered for the draft as a "Non-Citizen Indian" with an allotment. The Bureau found he had taken on the identity of James One Star, an Oglala man of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation 12 years his senior who had disappeared in Cuba in 1894. Dietz also claimed he was the head of an American film company that produced propaganda films for the war.

Dietz divorced De Cora in November 1918, charging her with abandonment. It is not clear how much she knew about his true identity. She died six days after his indictment.

Dietz was tried in Spokane, Washington in June 1919 for the first offense. One Star's sister, Sallie Eaglehorse, testified after seeing him for the first time at the trial that Dietz was definitely not her brother.[10] Still, the judge instructed the jury to determine whether Dietz "believed" he was an Indian, not whether it was true. Despite that others had witnessed his birth in the summer of 1884 or had seen him the following day, Dietz's mother Leanna claimed he was the Indian son of her husband who had been switched a week or more after she had a stillbirth. Dietz's acting ability along with his mother's fallacious testimony (to protect him from prison) resulted in a hung jury, but Dietz was immediately re-indicted. The second trial resulted in a sentence of 30 days in the Spokane County Jail after he pleaded "no contest".[10]

Head coaching record

College football

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Washington State (Independent) (1915–1916)
1915 Washington State 7–0 W Rose
1916 Washington State 4–2
Washington State (Pacific Coast Conference) (1917)
1917 Washington State 6–0–1 3–0 1st
Washington State: 17–2–1 3–0
Purdue Boilermakers (Big Ten Conference) (1921)
1921 Purdue 1–6 1–4 T–8th
Purdue: 1–6 1–4
Louisiana Tech Bulldogs (Louisiana Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1922–1923)
1922 Louisiana Tech 5–1–1 1–1–1 3rd
1923 Louisiana Tech 6–2 2–1 T–2nd
Louisiana Tech: 11–3–1
Wyoming Cowboys (Rocky Mountain Conference) (1924–1926)
1924 Wyoming 2–6 2–6 10th
1925 Wyoming 6–3 4–3 5th
1926 Wyoming 2–4–2 1–2–2 8th
Wyoming: 10–13–2 7–11–2
Haskell Fighting Indians () (1929–1932)
Haskell: 26–15–2
Albright Lions () (1937–1942)
1937 Albright 7–0–1
1938 Albright 4–5–1
1939 Albright 5–4
1940 Albright 5–5
1941 Albright 6–4
1942 Albright 4–5
Albright: 31–23–2
Total: 96–62–8

NFL

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Boston Redskins (Eastern) (1933–1934)
1933 Boston Redskins 5–5–2 3rd
1934 Boston Redskins 6–6 2nd
Boston Redskins: 11–11–2
Total: 11–11–2

College baseball

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Louisiana Tech Bulldogs () (1923)
1923 Louisiana Tech 16–6
Louisiana Tech: 16–6
Total: 16–6

References

  1. ^ Linda M. Waggoner, Reclaiming James One Star, Indian Country Today Media Network, 5 pt. series, July 2, 12, 20, 27, Aug. 8, 2004.
  2. ^ Richard Leiby (November 6, 2013). "The legend of Lone Star Dietz: Redskins namesake, coach — and possible impostor?". The Washington Post.
  3. ^ The Racist Redskins
  4. ^ https://theaxisofego.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/portsmouthohtimes18july1933.jpg
  5. ^ McCartney, Robert (May 28, 2014). "1933 news article refutes cherished tale that Redskins were named to honor Indian coach". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 29, 2014.
  6. ^ Richard Leiby (November 6, 2013). "The legend of Lone Star Dietz: Redskins namesake, coach — and possible impostor?". Washington Post. Retrieved June 27, 2017.
  7. ^ Linda M. Waggoner, "On Trial The Washington R*dskins' Wily Mascot: Coach William Lone Star Dietz", Montana: The Magazine of Western History, Spring 2013, pp. 24-47. Available at http://nmai.si.edu/sites/1/files/pdf/seminars-symposia/WaggonerWEBSpr2013.pdf
  8. ^ Waggoner, "On Trial: The Washington Redskins Wily Mascot"
  9. ^ Waggoner, "On Trial: The Washington R*dskins Wily Mascot"
  10. ^ a b "On Trial: The R*dskins Wily Mascot: Coach William "Lone Star" Dietz" (PDF). Montana, the Magazine of Western History – via National Museum of the American Indian.

Further reading

External links

1915 Washington State football team

The 1915 Washington State football team represented Washington State University during the 1915 college football season as an independent. The offense scored 204 points while the defense allowed 10 points. Led by head coach William Henry Dietz, the team won the Rose Bowl on New Year's Day in Pasadena, California.

For the first of two consecutive years, Washington State did not play in-state rival Washington.

1916 Rose Bowl

Originally titled the "Tournament East-West football game," the second of what is now known as the Rose Bowl Game was played on January 1, 1916. The Rose Bowl game has been played annually since this game.

The first game, the 1902 Tournament East-West football game, was so lopsided that for the next 13 years, the Tournament of Roses officials ran chariot races, ostrich races, and other various events instead of football. But, on New Year's Day 1916, football returned to stay as Washington State University defeated Brown University in this first annual Tournament of Roses football game.

1921 Purdue Boilermakers football team

The 1921 Purdue Boilermakers football team was an American football team that represented Purdue University during the 1921 Big Ten Conference football season. In their first season under head coach William Henry Dietz, the Boilermakers compiled a 1–6 record, finished in a tie for eighth place in the Big Ten Conference with a 1–4 record against conference opponents, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 95 to 9. E. R. Carman was the team captain.

1924 Wyoming Cowboys football team

The 1924 Wyoming Cowboys football team represented the University of Wyoming in the Rocky Mountain Conference (RMC) during the 1924 college football season. In its first season under head coach William Henry Dietz, the team compiled a 2–6 record and was outscored by a total of 140 to 59. George Mabee was the team captain.

1925 Wyoming Cowboys football team

The 1925 Wyoming Cowboys football team represented the University of Wyoming in the Rocky Mountain Conference (RMC) during the 1925 college football season. In its second season under head coach William Henry Dietz, the team compiled a 6–3 record (4–3 against RMC opponents), finished fifth in the conference, and outscored opponents by a total of 147 to 83. The team won its first five games and then lost three of the last four games of the season, including rivalry games with Utah Agricultural and Colorado Agricultural.The 1925 team had the only winning record in Wyoming program history between 1911 and 1931.

1926 Wyoming Cowboys football team

The 1926 Wyoming Cowboys football team represented the University of Wyoming in the Rocky Mountain Conference (RMC) during the 1926 college football season. In its third and final season under head coach William Henry Dietz, the team compiled a 2–4–2 record (1–2–2 against conference opponents) and outscored opponents by a total of 152 to 91.

Albert E. Herrnstein

Albert Ernest Herrnstein (August 15, 1882 – August 14, 1958) was an American football player and coach. He played at the University of Michigan as a halfback and end from 1899 to 1902 and was the head football coach at the Haskell Indian School (1903–1904), Purdue University (1905), and Ohio State University (1906–1909).

Eddie McLane

Lovick Pierce "Eddie" McLane (August 9, 1899 – June 22, 1980) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach at Anniston High School, Samford University (then named Howard College), and Louisiana Tech University. All three schools where McLane coached are nicknamed the Bulldogs. In McLane's final football season at Samford in 1933, his Bulldogs were Dixie Conference champions. McLane died on June 22, 1980 in Ruston, Louisiana.

Fred Akers

Fred Akers (born March 17, 1938) is a former American football player and coach. He served as head football coach at the University of Wyoming (1975–1976), the University of Texas at Austin (1977–1986), and Purdue University (1987–1990), compiling a career college football record of 108–75–3.

George L. Watkins

George LeGrande Watkins (June 8, 1886 – March 16, 1962) was a college football player and coach who was once mayor of Tulsa, Oklahoma. In 1959 Watkins was made chairman of the Tulsa County Excise Board by the Oklahoma Tax Commission.

Hugh E. Wilson

Hugh Edward "Gob" Wilson II (January 14, 1899 – April 6, 1962) was a college football and baseball coach at Louisiana Tech University and a college basketball coach at Louisiana State University.He is an alumnus of the University of Michigan, where he played as an lineman for Hall of Fame Coach Fielding H. Yost's Michigan Wolverines football team from 1918 to 1921. He died in Ann Arbor, Michigan in 1962.

List of Haskell Indian Nations Fighting Indians head football coaches

The Haskell Indian Nations Fighting Indians football program is a college football team that represents Haskell Indian Nations University as an Independent football school in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. The team has had 19 head coaches since its first recorded football game in 1896. The program has three coaches that have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

From 1937 until 1999, the school operated either as a high school or junior college. During this time the school fielded various football teams, but they are not listed here as being a part of the four-year college football program.

List of Louisiana Tech Bulldogs head football coaches

The Louisiana Tech Bulldogs football program is a college football team that represents Louisiana Tech University in Conference USA in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The Bulldogs are currently coached by Skip Holtz. The team has had 33 head coaches and one interim head coach since it started playing organized football in 1901.

List of Purdue Boilermakers head football coaches

The Purdue Boilermakers football program is a college football team that represents Purdue University in the Big Ten Conference in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The team has had 36 head coaches and 2 interim coaches since it started playing organized football in 1887 and has been known by the nickname Boilermakers since 1891. Purdue is an original member of the Big Ten, joining in 1896 after spending six years in the Indiana Intercollegiate Athletic Association. The Boilermakers have played in 1,187 games during their 126 seasons. Six coaches have led the Boilermakers to postseason bowl games: Jack Mollenkopf, Jim Young, Leon Burtnett, Joe Tiller, Danny Hope, and Jeff Brohm. Nine coaches have won conference championships with the Boilermakers: Snake Ames and D. M. Balliet in the Indiana Intercollegiate Athletic Association, and A. G. Scanlon, James Phelan, Noble Kizer, Elmer Burnham, Stu Holcomb, Mollenkopf and Tiller in the Big Ten. No Purdue coach has led the Boilermakers to a national championship. As of the end of the 2017 season, Tiller is the all-time leader in games coached (149) and wins (87), while Mollenkopf is the all-time leader years coached (14). Ames leads the Boilermakers in winning percentage with a perfect 1.000 in his two seasons at Purdue. Among coaches with more than two seasons of tenure, Kizer has the highest winning percentage, .750, and Darrell Hazell has the lowest winning percentage, with a record of 9-33-0 (.214) in three and half seasons.

Of the 36 Boilermakers coaches, five have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame: Andy Smith, William Henry Dietz, Phelan, Mollenkopf and Young. None have received National Coach of the Year honors. On December 5, 2016, Purdue hired Jeff Brohm to become the new head coach.

List of Washington State Cougars head football coaches

The Washington State Cougars college football team represents the Washington State University in the North Division of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12). The Cougars compete as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The program has had 32 head coaches since it began play during the 1894 season.

On November 30, 2011, Mike Leach agreed to terms and became head coach.

R. C. Kenney

R. C. Kenney was a football, basketball, and baseball coach at William & Vashti College and Louisiana Tech University. He was a graduate of Ohio State University. In 1915, Kenney served as the head football coach for William & Vashti College in Aledo, Illinois, and led them to 6 wins and 2 losses. Kenney later became the head coach for Louisiana Tech's football, men's basketball, and baseball teams for the 1925–26 academic year. He coached Louisiana Tech's football team to 1 win, 7 losses, and 2 ties. Kenney was the first basketball coach in Louisiana Tech history and led Louisiana Tech's basketball team to 7 wins and 7 losses in the program's inaugural season. The Bulldogs lost the program's first two games to Centenary, but Kenney recorded Louisiana Tech's first ever basketball victory against Louisiana College. Kenney experienced the most success on the diamond leading Louisiana Tech's baseball team to 17 wins and 5 losses.

R. Foster Clark

R. Foster Clark was a football and baseball head coach at Louisiana Tech University. Clark has the highest winning percentage of any football and baseball head coach in Louisiana Tech history. Clark finished the 1921 football season undefeated with 6 wins and 0 losses and became Louisiana Intercollegiate Athletic Association champions.

Ray E. Davis

Raymond Elswood Davis (September 14, 1907 – August 26, 1972) was an American football player and coach of football and baseball. He was the head football and baseball coach at Louisiana Polytechnic Institute—now known as Louisiana Tech University—in 1939. Davis played college football at Howard College—now known as Samford University—in Homewood, Alabama. He played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) with the Portsmouth Spartans in 1932 and 1933. David returned to his alma mater, Howard, in 1934, where he served as line coach for the football team under head coaches Clyde Propst and Billy Bancroft.

Washington State Cougars football

The Washington State Cougars football program is the intercollegiate American football team for Washington State University, located in the U.S. state of Washington. The team competes at the NCAA Division I level in the FBS and is a member of the North Division of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12). Known as the Cougars, the first football team was fielded in 1894.

The Cougars play home games on campus at Martin Stadium in Pullman, Washington, which opened in 1972; the site dates back to 1892 when it was called Soldier Field. Its present seating capacity is 33,522. Their main rivals are the Washington Huskies. The Cougars and Huskies historically end each regular season with the Apple Cup rivalry game in late November. They are currently coached by Mike Leach.

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