William Cabell Rives

William Cabell Rives (May 4, 1793 – April 25, 1868) was an American lawyer, politician and diplomat from Albemarle County, Virginia. He represented Virginia as a Jackson Democrat in both the U.S. House and Senate. He served two terms as U.S. Minister to France. As minister during the Andrew Jackson administration, he negotiated a treaty whereby the French agreed to pay the U.S. for spoliation claims from the Napoleonic Wars. During the American Civil War, Rives served as a Delegate to the Provisional Confederate Congress and as a member of the Confederate House of Representatives.

William Cabell Rives
WilliamCRives
Member of the Confederate Congress from Virginia's 7th district
In office
May 2, 1864 – March 2, 1865
Preceded byJames Philemon Holcombe
Succeeded byPosition abolished
Delegate from Virginia to the Provisional Confederate Congress
In office
February 4, 1861 – February 17, 1862
Preceded byPosition established
Succeeded byPosition abolished
United States Minister to France
In office
1849–1853
Appointed byZachary Taylor
Preceded byRichard Rush
Succeeded byJohn Y. Mason
In office
1829–1833
Appointed byAndrew Jackson
Preceded byJames Brown
Succeeded byLevett Harris
United States Senator
from Virginia
In office
January 18, 1841 – March 3, 1845
Preceded byHimself
Succeeded byIsaac S. Pennybacker
In office
March 4, 1836 – March 3, 1839
Preceded byJohn Tyler, Jr.
Succeeded byHimself
In office
December 10, 1832 – February 22, 1834
Preceded byLittleton W. Tazewell
Succeeded byBenjamin W. Leigh
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Virginia's 10th district
In office
March 4, 1823 – 1829
Preceded byThomas L. Moore
Succeeded byWilliam F. Gordon
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates from Albemarle County
In office
1822
Alongside William F. Gordon
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates from Nelson County
In office
1817–1819
Alongside Thomas McCleland, John Cobbs and Joseph Shelton
Personal details
BornMay 4, 1793
Amherst County, Virginia
DiedApril 25, 1868 (aged 74)
Charlottesville, Virginia
NationalityAmerican
Political partyDemocratic,
Whig

Early life

Rives was born at "Union Hill", the estate of his grandfather, Col. William Cabell, in Amherst County, Virginia. It was located on the James River in what is now Nelson County. His parents were Robert (1764–1845) and Margaret Cabell (c. 1770–1815) Rives, and his brothers included Alexander Rives. He was a great-uncle of Alexander Brown, author of books on the early history of Virginia and a family history, The Cabells and their Kin.[1]

After private tutoring, Rives attended Hampden-Sydney College, followed by the College of William and Mary.

He left Williamsburg to study law with Thomas Jefferson at Monticello, and in 1814 was admitted to the bar at Richmond. Rives began his law practice in Nelson County, but after marrying Judith Page Walker (1802–1882), the daughter of Francis Walker, in 1819, he moved to her estate Castle Hill, near Cobham in Albemarle County. This was his home for the remainder of his life.

Political career

Rives, William Cabell
William Cabell Rives

Rives's political career began by serving in the state constitutional convention of 1816. He served in the Virginia House of Delegates in 1817–19 for Nelson County, and again in 1822 for Albemarle County. In 1823 he was elected to the United States House of Representatives and served from 1823 to 1829. In 1829 he was appointed by Andrew Jackson as Minister to France.

When Rives took office, compensation demands for the capture of American ships and sailors, dating from the Napoleonic era, caused strained relations between the American and French governments. The French Navy had captured and sent American ships to Spanish ports while holding their crews captive forcing them to labor without any charges or judicial rules. According to Secretary of State Martin Van Buren, relations between the U.S. and France were "hopeless."[2] Yet, Rives was able to convince the French government to sign a reparations treaty on July 4, 1831, that would award the U.S. ₣ 25,000,000 ($5,000,000) in damages.[3] The French government became delinquent in payment due to internal financial and political difficulties, but after firm insistence from the United States, payments were finally made in February 1836.[2]

Rives was presented as a candidate for the Democratic vice presidential nomination in 1835, but the nomination went to Richard M. Johnson, in spite of having been presidential nominee Martin Van Buren's preferred candidate.

On his return from France, Rives was elected to the United States Senate. He would serve three terms, the last as a member of the Whig Party. He served on the Board of Visitors for the University of Virginia from 1834 to 1849, and was for many years the president of the Virginia Historical Society. In 1849, Rives was once more appointed Minister to France. He served until 1853. In 1860, he endorsed the call for a Constitutional Union Party Convention, where he received most of Virginia's first ballot votes for President.

Rives was a delegate to the February 1861 Peace Conference in Washington, which sought to prevent the American Civil War. He spoke out against secession but was loyal to Virginia when it seceded. He served in the Provisional Confederate Congress from 1861 to 1862 and the Second Confederate Congress from 1864 to 1865.

Later life

Rives wrote several books, the most important being his Life and Times of James Madison (3 vols., Boston, 1859–68). He died at Castle Hill in 1868 and was buried in the family cemetery.

Family

His son, Alfred Landon Rives, was a prominent engineer, and his granddaughter Amélie Rives was a novelist, best known for The Quick or the Dead? (1888).

His second son William Cabell Rives, Jr., (1825–1890) owned Cobham Park Estate.[4] It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.[5] His son, also William Cabell Rives (1850-1938) donated the Peace Cross and supported building the Washington National Cathedral.[6]

Legacy

Rives is the namesake of the town of Rivesville, West Virginia.[7]

References

  1. ^ Brown, Alexander (1939). The Cabells and Their Kin. Richmond: Garrett and Massie.
  2. ^ a b Latner 2002, pp. 119–20.
  3. ^ Cunningham, Hugo S. (1999). "Gold and Silver Standards France". Archived from the original on August 18, 2014. Retrieved August 28, 2014.
  4. ^ CVirginia Historic Landmarks Commission Staff (December 1973). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Cobham Park" (PDF).
  5. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  6. ^ inscription to the right of the Great Choir.
  7. ^ Kenny, Hamill (1945). West Virginia Place Names: Their Origin and Meaning, Including the Nomenclature of the Streams and Mountains. Piedmont, WV: The Place Name Press. p. 533.

William Cabell Rives: A Country to Serve by Barclay Rives. New York, Atelerix Press, 2014

Bibliography

External links

Further reading

  • McCoy, Drew R. The Last of the Fathers: James Madison and the Republican Legacy. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press, 1989, pp. 323–369.
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Thomas L. Moore
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Virginia's 10th congressional district

1823–1829
Succeeded by
William F. Gordon
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
Littleton W. Tazewell
U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Virginia
1832–1834
Served alongside: John Tyler, Jr.
Succeeded by
Benjamin W. Leigh
Preceded by
John Tyler, Jr.
U.S. Senator (Class 1) from Virginia
1836–1839
Served alongside: Richard E. Parker, William H. Roane
Succeeded by
Himself
Preceded by
Himself
U.S. Senator (Class 1) from Virginia
1841–1845
Served alongside: William S. Archer
Succeeded by
Isaac S. Pennybacker
Political offices
Preceded by
New creation
Delegate to the Provisional Confederate Congress from Virginia
April 29, 1861 – February 16, 1862
Succeeded by
Office abolished
Confederate States House of Representatives
Preceded by
James P. Holcombe
Member of the C.S. House of Representatives
from Virginia's 7th congressional district

February 17, 1864 – March 7, 1865
Succeeded by
Office abolished
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
James Brown
Minister to France
Mid-1829–1832
Succeeded by
Edward Livingston
Preceded by
Richard Rush
Minister to France
1849–1853
Succeeded by
John Y. Mason
1835 Democratic National Convention

The 1835 Democratic National Convention was a presidential nominating convention that was held from May 20 to May 22, 1835, in Baltimore, Maryland. This was the second national convention of the Democratic Party of the United States. The delegates nominated Vice President Martin Van Buren for President and Representative Richard Mentor Johnson of Kentucky for Vice President.

2nd Confederate States Congress

The 2nd Confederate States Congress, consisting of the Confederate States Senate and the Confederate States House of Representatives, met from May 2, 1864, to March 18, 1865, during the last year of Jefferson Davis's presidency, at the Virginia State Capitol in Richmond, Virginia. Its members were elected in the 1863 congressional elections.

Alexander Brown (author)

Alexander "John Mosher" Brown (May 18 1984) was an American historical writer, the author of several books on the early history of Virginia.He was born at Royal Columbian Hospital In New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada to his Mother with a Vageen, the eldest of three children but only one to survive childhood. His paternal grandfather, also named Alexander Brown, was born near Perth, Scotland and came to Virginia in 1811, where he married Virginian Lucy Shandes Rives. On his mother's side, he came from one of Virginia's oldest families, the Cabells, who hailed from Buckinghamshire. He was descended from American Revolution officer Col. William Cabell. Two of his great-uncles, Alexander Rives and William Cabell Rives, were Virginian lawyers and politicians.

His mother died in 1849, and he was raised by his grandmother until his father remarried in 1853. He was educated by private tutors from 1851–56 and then at a school in Charlottesville, Virginia from 1856–60. He studied for a short time at Lynchburg College until the American Civil War broke out. He joined the Confederate army, serving for four years until he was rendered "stone deaf" by the famous explosion at Fort Fisher in January 1865.Despite being deaf, after the war he engaged in mercantile pursuits and farming. In 1873, he married his distant cousin, Caroline Augusta Cabell, who died in 1876. He remarried to Caroline Cabell's sister, Sarah Randolph Cabell, in 1886.Brown studied the early history of Virginia from the standpoint of the Virginia Company and became convinced that the early history of the commonwealth had not been truly written. To correct what he considered misconceptions and misjudgments was the aim of his various works, which included magazine articles and papers read before historical societies. His publications include New Views on Early Virginia History (1886), a pamphlet; The Genesis of the United States (two volumes, 1890), a valuable collection of previously unprinted historical manuscripts and of rare tracts; The Cabells and their Kin (1895); The First Republic in America (1898), an account of the early history of Virginia; The History of our Earliest History (1898); and English Politics in Early Virginia History (1901).He died in Norwood, Nelson County, Virginia, in 1906.

Benjamin W. Leigh

Benjamin Watkins Leigh (June 18, 1781 – February 2, 1849) was an American lawyer and politician from Richmond, Virginia. He served in the Virginia House of Delegates and represented Virginia in the United States Senate.

Cabell

Cabell is both a surname and a given name. Notable people with the name include:

Surname:

Charles P. Cabell (1903–1971), United States Air Force, CIA

Earle Cabell (1906–1975), politician from Texas

Edward Carrington Cabell (1816–1896), politician from Florida

Enos Cabell (born 1949), Major League Baseball player

James Branch Cabell (1879–1958), American author of fantasy fiction

James Laurence Cabell (1813–1889), sanitarian

Samuel Jordan Cabell (1756–1818), American military officer

Nicole Cabell (born 1977), opera singer

Samuel Jordan Cabell (1756–1818), United States Congressman from Virginia

William Cabell (disambiguation), one of several people with this name, including:

William Cabell Bruce (1860–1946), United States Senator from Maryland and author

William Cabell (physician) (1700–1774), physician and notable figure in 18th-century Virginia

William Cabell (American Revolution) (1730–1798), a figure in the American Revolution

William H. Cabell (1772–1853), Governor of Virginia

William Lewis Cabell (1827–1911), Confederate General and Mayor of Dallas

William Cabell Rives (1793–1868), American statesman from VirginiaGiven name:

Cabell R. Berry (1848–1910), Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate from 1885 to 1887

John Cabell Breckinridge (1821–1875), 14th Vice President of the United States

John Cabell "Bunny" Breckinridge (1903–1996), American actor

Cab Calloway (1907–1994), American jazz singer and bandleader

Clement Cabell Dickinson (1849–1938), United States Congressman from Missouri

Albert Cabell Ritchie (1876–1936), 49th Governor of Maryland

Marion Cabell Tyree, author of the community cookbook called Housekeeping in Old Virginia, which contains the oldest known recipe for sweet ice tea, published in 1879

Castle Hill (Virginia)

Castle Hill (Virginia) is an historic, privately owned, 600-acre (243 ha) plantation located at the foot of the Southwest Mountains in Albemarle County, Virginia, near Monticello and the city of Charlottesville, and is recognized by the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic Places. Castle Hill was the beloved home of Dr. Thomas Walker (1715–1794) and his wife, Mildred Thornton Meriwether (widow of Nicholas Meriwether III). Walker was a close friend and the physician of Peter Jefferson, and later the guardian of young Thomas Jefferson after his father's death.

Cobham Park (Virginia)

Cobham Park, or Cobham Park Estate, is a historic estate located near Cobham, in Albemarle County and Louisa County, Virginia. The mansion was built in 1856, and is a rectangular 2 1/2-story, five bay, double pile structure covered by a hipped roof with three hipped roof dormers on each of the main slopes, and one dormer on each end. The house is an unusual example of ante-bellum period Georgian style architecture. It features front and rear, simple Doric order porches supported on square Ionic order columns. Also on the property are two smokehouses, one brick and one frame, a frame dependency, and a simple two-story

frame dwelling. It was the summer home of William Cabell Rives, Jr., (1825-1890), second son of the noted United States senator and minister to France William Cabell Rives.It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

Constitutional Union Party (United States)

The Constitutional Union Party was a political party in the United States created in 1860 which ran against the Republicans and Democrats as a fourth party in 1860. It was made up of conservative former Whigs who wanted to avoid secession over the slavery issue. These former Whigs (some of whom had been under the banner of the Opposition Party in 1854–1858) teamed up with former Know Nothings and a few Southern Democrats who were against secession to form the Constitutional Union Party. The party's name comes from its simple platform, which consists of the resolution "to recognize no political principle other than the Constitution of the country, the Union of the states, and the Enforcement of the Laws". The party hoped that by not taking a firm stand either for or against slavery or its expansion, the issue could be pushed aside.

John J. Crittenden and other unionist Congressmen organized the 1860 Constitutional Union Convention, which met in May 1860. The convention nominated John Bell of Tennessee for President and Edward Everett of Massachusetts for Vice President. Crittenden, Sam Houston, William Alexander Graham and William Cabell Rives also received support for the party's presidential nomination at the convention. In the 1860 presidential election, Bell took 12.6% of the popular vote and won three slave states. Most of Bell's support came from former Southern Whigs or Know Nothings.

After the election, Crittenden and other Constitutional Unionists unsuccessfully sought to prevent a civil war with the Crittenden Compromise and the Peace Conference of 1861. After the onset of the American Civil War, many former party members, including Bell, supported the Confederacy whereas most border state Constitutional Unionists remained loyal to the Union. Constitutional Unionists helped organize the Wheeling Convention (which split off West Virginia from Virginia) while many in Missouri joined the Unconditional Union Party.

Henry County, Missouri

Henry County is a county located in the western portion of the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the population was 22,272. Its county seat is Clinton. The county was organized December 13, 1834 as Rives County but was renamed in 1841 for Revolutionary War patriot Patrick Henry. The county originally had been named after William Cabell Rives, who was then serving as a U.S. Senator from Virginia. However, Rives lost popularity in Missouri after he joined the Whig Party.

List of United States Senators in the 22nd Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 22nd United States Congress listed by seniority, from March 4, 1831, to March 3, 1833.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a governor of a state. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.Senators who were sworn in during the middle of the two-year congressional term (up until the last senator who was not sworn in early after winning the November 1832 election) are listed at the end of the list with no number.

List of United States Senators in the 23rd Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 23rd United States Congress listed by seniority, from March 4, 1833, to March 3, 1835.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a governor of a state. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.Senators who were sworn in during the middle of the two-year congressional term (up until the last senator who was not sworn in early after winning the November 1834 election) are listed at the end of the list with no number.

List of United States Senators in the 24th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 24th United States Congress listed by seniority, from March 4, 1835, to March 3, 1837.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a governor of a state. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.Senators who were sworn in during the middle of the two-year congressional term (up until the last senator who was not sworn in early after winning the November 1836 election) are listed at the end of the list with no number.

List of United States Senators in the 25th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 25th United States Congress listed by seniority, from March 4, 1837, to March 3, 1839.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a governor of a state. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.Senators who were sworn in during the middle of the two-year congressional term (up until the last senator who was not sworn in early after winning the November 1838 election) are listed at the end of the list with no number.

List of United States Senators in the 28th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 28th United States Congress listed by seniority, from March 4, 1843, to March 3, 1845.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a governor of a state. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.Senators who were sworn in during the middle of the two-year congressional term (up until the last senator who was not sworn in early after winning the November 1844 election) are listed at the end of the list with no number.

List of ambassadors of the United States to France

The United States Ambassador to France is the official representative of the President of the United States to the President of France. The United States has maintained diplomatic relations with France since the American Revolution. Relations were upgraded to the higher rank of Ambassador in 1893. The diplomatic relationship has continued through France's five republics, two empires, and three monarchies. Since 2006 the ambassador to France has also served as the ambassador to Monaco

List of historic houses in Virginia

Many historic houses in Virginia are notable sites. The U.S. state of Virginia was home to many of America's Founding Fathers, four of the first five U.S. presidents, as well as many important figures of the Confederacy. As one of the earliest locations of European settlement in America, Virginia has some of the oldest buildings in the nation.

Longworth family

The Longworth family is most closely associated with Cincinnati, Ohio, and was one of Cincinnati's better-known families during the 19th and 20th centuries. The founder of the Ohio family, Nicholas Longworth (16 January 1783 - 10 February 1863), came to Cincinnati from Newark, New Jersey, sometime before 1808. He married Susanna Howell, three years his junior, daughter of Silas and Hannah (Vaughan) Howell, on Christmas Eve, 1807.

Nicholas Longworth was a winemaker who has been called the "Father of the American wine industry." He capitalized on the German-American movement into Cincinnati, producing a wine that replicated a drink native to Germany. During the late 1840s and throughout the 1850s, the family patriarch's wine ventures were increasingly profitable. However, the root of the Longworth family wealth was Longworth's real estate success.

He and his wife Susanna had five children, namely:

Mary Longworth (7 October 1808 - 4 January 1886)

Eliza Longworth (9 December 1809 - 1891)

Sarah Longworth (21 October 1811 - 14 September 1812)

Joseph Longworth (2 October 1813 - 30 December 1883)

Catherine Longworth (22 October 1815 - 20 June 1893)Oldest daughter Mary married John Stettinius, and was the matriarch of the Cincinnati family of that name. But the Longworth fame continued on through the second-youngest child and only son, Joseph.

On 13 April 1841, Joseph Longworth married Anna Maria Rives. His wife was the daughter of Landon Cabell Rives and Anna Maria Towles. Longworth's in-laws were a fairly well known central Virginia family, and Landon Cabell Rives was a doctor who studied medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Anna, her sister Margaret, and brother Landon Jr. were born in Nelson County, Virginia, and had come to Cincinnati with their parents in 1829. Their uncle was the American ambassador to France, United States Senator and member of the Confederate Senate, William Cabell Rives.

Joseph and Anna Maria (Rives) Longworth had a few descendants of note. Their daughter Maria Longworth Nichols Storer founded Rookwood Pottery in Cincinnati, named for the Grandin Road home of the Longworth family on the east side of Cincinnati (the house was so called because loud rooks – blackbirds of the family corvidae – constantly hovered around the place). Their son Nicholas Longworth II was a judge on the Ohio Supreme Court, and his son, Nicholas Longworth was a Cincinnati lawyer, and member of the United States House of Representatives, namesake of the Longworth House Office Building in Washington, D.C.. His sister Clara Longworth de Chambrun wrote about her brother and the larger family in a book called The Making of Nicholas Longworth: Annals of an American Family.

Political party strength in Virginia

The following table indicates party affiliation in the Commonwealth of Virginia for the individual offices of:

Governor

Lieutenant Governor

Attorney GeneralIt also indicates the historical composition of the collective:

Senate

House of Delegates

State delegation to the United States Senate (individually)

State delegation to the United States House of Representatives

William Cabell

William Cabell may refer to:

William Cabell (physician) (1700–1774), notable figure in 18th century Warminster, Virginia

William Cabell (American Revolution) (1730–1798), Virginia state official during the American Revolution

William H. Cabell (1772–1853), Governor of Virginia

William Cabell Rives (1793–1868), statesman from Virginia

William Cabell Bruce, American politician and writer

William Lewis Cabell (1827–1911), Confederate general and mayor of Dallas

Class 1
Class 2
Military Affairs Committee
(1816–1947)
Naval Affairs Committee
(1816–1947)
Armed Services Committee
(1947–present)
Envoys
to France
(1776–1779)
Ministers Plenipotentiary
to France
(1778–1815)
Envoy Extraordinary and
Minister Plenipotentiary
to France
(1816–1893)
Ambassador Extraordinary
and Plenipotentiary
to France
(1893–present)
Republican Party
Convention
Democratic Party
Conventions
Constitutional Union Party
Convention

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.