William Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland

William Henry Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland PC DCL (24 June 1768 – 27 March 1854), styled Marquess of Titchfield until 1809, was a British politician who served in various positions in the governments of George Canning and Lord Goderich.


The Duke of Portland

4th-Duke-of-Portland
Lord Privy Seal
In office
30 April 1827 – July 1827
MonarchGeorge IV
Prime MinisterGeorge Canning
Preceded byThe Earl of Westmorland
Succeeded byThe Earl of Carlisle
Lord President of the Council
In office
17 August 1827 – 21 January 1828
MonarchGeorge IV
Prime MinisterThe Viscount Goderich
Preceded byThe Earl of Harrowby
Succeeded byThe Earl Bathurst
Member of Parliament for Petersfield
In office
29 December 1790 – 18 April 1791
Preceded byHon. George North
William Jolliffe
Succeeded byWelbore Ellis
William Jolliffe
Member of Parliament for Buckinghamshire
In office
18 April 1791 – 30 October 1809
Preceded byThe Earl Verney
James Grenville
Succeeded byEarl Temple
William Selby Lowndes
Personal details
Born24 June 1768
London, England[1]
Died27 March 1854 (aged 85)
Welbeck Abbey, Nottinghamshire
NationalityBritish
Political partyConservative
Spouse(s)
Henrietta née Scott
(m. 1795; died 1844)
Children9, including William, John, George, and Henry
ParentsWilliam Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland
Lady Dorothy Cavendish

Background and education

Portland was the eldest son of Prime Minister William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland and Lady Dorothy, daughter of William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire and Charlotte Boyle, Baroness Clifford. He was the elder brother of Lord William Bentinck and Lord Charles Bentinck.[2]

He was educated first in Ealing under the tutelage of Samuel Goodenough graduating in 1774, followed by Westminster School (1783). He attended Christ Church, Oxford for two years but did not take a degree.[1] The third Duke, who spared no expense for his heir, sent him to The Hague in 1786 for experience working with the crown's envoy, Sir James Harris. He returned in 1789.[3]

He later received an honorary degree of Doctor of Civil Law from Oxford in 1793.[1] He also served as a Family Trustee of the British Museum;[2] in 1810, he loaned the famed Portland Vase to the museum.[4]

Political career

William Henry Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland
William Henry Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland, as a child

Portland was Member of Parliament for Petersfield between 1790 and 1791 and for Buckinghamshire between 1791 and 1809.[3]

He served under his father as a Lord of the Treasury between March and September 1807. He remained out of office until April 1827 when he was appointed Lord Privy Seal by his brother-in-law George Canning.[5] He was sworn of the Privy Council the same year.[5] When Lord Goderich became Prime Minister in August 1827, Portland became Lord President of the Council,[6] an office he retained until the government fell in January 1828. Over time the Duke became less of a staunch Conservative, softening to some of the more liberal stances of Canning.[1]

Portland also held the honorary post of Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex between 1794 and 1841.

Family

Portland married Henrietta, eldest daughter and heiress of Major-General John Scott of Fife and his wife Margaret (née Dundas), in London on 4 August 1795. At the time of his marriage he obtained Royal Licence to take the name and arms of Scott in addition to that of Cavendish-Bentinck. They were parents of nine children:[2][7]

Death and legacy

The Duchess of Portland died 24 April 1844.[1] Nearly 10 years later, Portland died at the family seat of Welbeck Abbey, Nottinghamshire, in March 1854, aged 85. Two of their sons predeceased their parents; their eldest dying of a brain lesion and their third son dying of a heart attack.

The duke expressed a desire to be buried in the open churchyard in Bolsover, Derbyshire, near the other family seat at Bolsover Castle. However, he was instead interred in the ancient Cavendish vault, that had previously been unopened for 138 years.[7]

He was succeeded in the dukedom by his second but eldest surviving son, William.

The department of Manuscripts and Special Collections, The University of Nottingham holds a number of papers relating to Portland: His personal and political papers are part of the Portland (Welbeck) Collection while the Portland (London) Collection contains papers relating to his estate business. The Portland Estate Papers held at Nottinghamshire Archives also contain items relating to Portland's properties.

Titles

His full titles were Duke of Portland, Marquess of Titchfield, Earl of Portland, Viscount Woodstock, and Baron Cirencester.[2]

  • The Most Honourable William Cavendish-Bentinck, Marquess of Titchfield (1768–1795)
  • The Most Honourable William Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, Marquess of Titchfield (1795–1809)
  • His Grace The Duke of Portland (1809–1854)

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Death of the Duke of Portland". The Times. The Times Digital Archive. 29 March 1854. p. 11.
  2. ^ a b c d Debrett, John (1828). Debrett's Peerage of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland: Volume 1. Debrett's. p. 31.
  3. ^ a b "CAVENDISH BENTINCK (afterwards CAVENDISH SCOTT BENTINCK), William Henry, Mq. of Titchfield (1768–1854), of Welbeck Abbey, Notts". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 24 March 2015.
  4. ^ "The conservation history of the Portland Vase". British Museum. Retrieved 24 March 2015.
  5. ^ a b "No. 18357". The London Gazette. 1 May 1827. p. 961.
  6. ^ "No. 18389". The London Gazette. 21 August 1827. p. 1785.
  7. ^ a b "Funeral of the Duke of Portland". The Times. The Times Digital Archive. 5 April 1854. p. 12.

External links

Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Hon. George North
William Jolliffe
Member of Parliament for Petersfield
1790–1791
With: William Jolliffe
Succeeded by
Welbore Ellis
William Jolliffe
Preceded by
The Earl Verney
James Grenville
Member of Parliament for Buckinghamshire
1791–1800
With: James Grenville 1790–1797
Earl Temple 1797–1800
Succeeded by
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Member of Parliament for Buckinghamshire
1801–1809
With: Earl Temple
Succeeded by
Earl Temple
William Selby Lowndes
Political offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Westmorland
Lord Privy Seal
1827
Succeeded by
The Earl of Carlisle
Preceded by
Minister without Portfolio
1827
Succeeded by
Preceded by
The Earl of Harrowby
Lord President of the Council
1827–1828
Succeeded by
The Earl Bathurst
Honorary titles
Preceded by
In Commission
Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex
1794–1841
Succeeded by
The Marquess of Salisbury
Preceded by
Henry Dundas
Custos Rotulorum of Middlesex
1794–1841
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
William Cavendish-Bentinck
Duke of Portland
1809–1854
Succeeded by
William Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck
1854

1854 (MDCCCLIV)

was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1854th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 854th year of the 2nd millennium, the 54th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1850s decade. As of the start of 1854, the Gregorian calendar was

12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Baron Howard de Walden

Baron Howard de Walden is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created by writ of summons in 1597 by Queen Elizabeth I for Admiral Lord Thomas Howard, a younger son of Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, by his second wife, the Honourable Margaret Audley, daughter of Thomas Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Walden.

Baron Seaford

Baron Seaford, of Seaford in the County of Sussex, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1826 for Charles Ellis, who had earlier represented Heytesbury, Seaford and East Grinstead in the House of Commons. In 1798 he married the Hon. Elizabeth Catherine Caroline Hervey, daughter of John Hervey, Lord Hervey, eldest son of Frederick Augustus Hervey, 4th Earl of Bristol and 5th Baron Howard de Walden. In 1803 Lord Seaford's four-year-old son Charles Ellis inherited the barony of Howard de Walden from his great-grandfather and became the sixth Baron Howard de Walden (this title was created by writ in 1597; see the Baron Howard de Walden for earlier history of this peerage). In 1845 he also succeeded his father as second Baron Seaford.

Charles married in 1828 Lady Lucy Cavendish-Bentinck, daughter of William Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland, and his wife Henrietta Scott. Through this marriage a substantial fortune came into the Ellis family, mainly based on property ownership in central London. His grandson, the eighth and fourth Baron, assumed in 1917 by Royal Licence his great-grandmother's surname of Scott in addition to that of Ellis. He was succeeded by his son, the ninth and fifth Baron respectively. On his death in 1999 the two baronies separated.

The barony of Howard de Walden fell into abeyance between the late Baron's four daughters, while the barony of Seaford, which could only be inherited through male lines, was passed on to his second cousin once removed, the sixth and (as of 2010) present holder of the title. He is the great-grandson of the Hon. William Charles Ellis, second son of the second Baron Seaford. Lord Seaford is also high in line of succession to the barony of Howard de Walden.

However, by Royal Warrant dated 25 June 2004, the Queen called the Barony of Howard de Walden out of abeyance in favour of the eldest daughter, Mary Hazel Caridwen Czernin (born 1935). In 1957 she had married Joseph Czernin, son of Count Franz Josef Czernin, a member of one of the oldest and most prominent noble families of the former Kingdom of Bohemia, now Czech Republic. By her husband she has five daughters and a son, Peter Joseph Czernin (born 1966), who is heir to the title.

Bentinck family

The Bentinck family is a prominent family belonging to both Dutch and British nobility. Its members have served in the armed forces and as ambassadors and politicians, including Governor General of India and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. The family is related to the British Royal Family via Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother's maternal Cavendish-Bentinck line.

Charles Cavendish-Bentinck (priest)

Charles William Frederick Cavendish-Bentinck (8 November 1817 – 17 August 1865) was a clergyman of the Church of England, holding livings in Bedfordshire, and a great-grandfather of Queen Elizabeth II.

He used his names in the order William Charles Frederick Cavendish-Bentinck, and his usual signature was "W. C. C. Bentinck".

Dorothy Bentinck, Duchess of Portland

Dorothy Bentinck, Duchess of Portland (née Lady Dorothy Cavendish; 27 August 1750 – 3 June 1794) was Duchess of Portland as wife of William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, the Prime Minister of Great Britain. She is also a great-great-great-grandmother of Queen Elizabeth II through the queen's maternal grandmother.

Duchess of Portland

The Duchess of Portland refers to the wife or widow of a Duke of Portland, a former title in the peerage of Great Britain. The title was created in 1716 but became extinct in 1990 upon the death of the ninth Duke.

Earl of Portland

Earl of Portland is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of England, first in 1633 and again in 1689. The title Duke of Portland was created in 1716 but became extinct in 1990 upon the death of the ninth Duke, when the Earldom was inherited by a distant cousin.

Elizabeth Livingston Cavendish-Bentinck

Elizabeth Livingston Cavendish-Bentinck (August 12, 1855 – November 4, 1943), was an American born member of the Livingston family who married a British Member of Parliament from the Cavendish-Bentinck family and was a prominent member of New York Society during the Gilded Age.

Francis Bedford (bookbinder)

Francis Bedford (18 June 1799 – 8 June 1883) was an English bookbinder.

Henrietta Bentinck, Duchess of Portland

Henrietta Bentinck, Duchess of Portland (1774 – 24 April 1844), formerly Henrietta Scott, was the wife of William Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland.

Henrietta was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, and was the eldest daughter and the heiress of Major-General John Scott of Fife and his second wife, the former Margaret Dundas. Prior to her marriage, she was sometimes referred to as "the rich Miss Scott", to differentiate her from her two younger sisters.Henrietta married the future duke in London on 4 August 1795, when he was styled Marquess of Titchfield. The marquess obtained Royal Licence to take the name and arms of Scott in addition to that of Cavendish-Bentinck. They had nine children:

William Henry, Marquess of Titchfield (22 October 1796 – 5 March 1824)

Lady Margaret Harriet Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck (1798-1882), who died unmarried

Lady Caroline Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck (1799-1828)

William Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, 5th Duke of Portland (1800-1879)

Lord George Frederick Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck (1802-1848), who died unmarried

Lord Henry William Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck (1804-1870), who died unmarried

Lady Charlotte Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck (1806-1889), who married John Evelyn Denison, 1st Viscount Ossington

Lady Lucy Joan Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck (1807-1899), who married Charles Ellis, 6th Baron Howard de Walden, and had children

Lady Mary Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck (1809-1874), who married Lt.-Col. Sir William TophamThe marquess inherited his father's dukedom in 1809, and Henrietta became Duchess of Portland. Their family home was Welbeck Abbey, Nottinghamshire, where the duke kept racehorses and carried out extensive irrigation works.Two of the couple's sons predeceased their parents: the Marquess of Titchfield died of a brain lesion, aged 27, and Lord George Bentinck of a heart attack. The duchess predeceased her husband, who died at Welbeck Abbey in March 1854, aged 85.

John Bentinck, 5th Duke of Portland

William John Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, 5th Duke of Portland (17 September 1800 – 6 December 1879), styled Lord John Bentinck before 1824 and Marquess of Titchfield between 1824 and 1854, was a British Army officer and peer, most remembered for his eccentric behaviour. A recluse who preferred to live in seclusion, he had an elaborate underground maze excavated under his estate at Welbeck Abbey near Clumber Park in North Nottinghamshire.

John Scott (British Army officer)

Major-general John Scott of Balcomie (bapt. 1725 – 7 December 1775) was a Scottish politician and senior British Army officer.

Lord Charles Bentinck

Lieutenant-Colonel Lord William Charles Augustus Cavendish-Bentinck (3 October 1780 – 28 April 1826), known as Lord Charles Bentinck, was a British soldier and politician and a great-great-grandfather of Queen Elizabeth II.

Lord George Bentinck

Lord William George Frederick Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck (27 February 1802 – 21 September 1848), better known as Lord George Bentinck, was an English Conservative politician and racehorse owner, noted for his role (with Benjamin Disraeli) in unseating Sir Robert Peel over the Corn Laws.

Lord Henry Bentinck

Lord Henry William Scott-Bentinck (9 June 1804 – 31 December 1870), known as Lord Henry Bentinck, was a British Conservative Party politician.

Tiresias (horse)

Tiresias (1816–1837) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and sire. In a career that lasted from April 1819 to July 1820 he ran thirteen times, all but two of them at Newmarket and won eleven races. Both of his defeats came when he was attempting to concede weight to opponents in match races. His most important win came in May 1819 when he won the Derby. Tiresias's racing career was ended by injury in the summer of 1820, after which he was retired to stud.

William Bentinck

William Bentinck may refer to:

William Bentinck (Royal Navy officer) (1764–1813), Royal Navy officer

Lord William Bentinck (1774–1839), British soldier and statesman

William Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland (1649–1709), Knight of the Garter

William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland (1709–1762), Knight of the Garter

William Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland (1768–1854), British politician

William Bentinck, Viscount Woodstock (born 1984), entrepreneur

William Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, Marquess of Titchfield

William Henry Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, Marquess of Titchfield (21 August 1796 – 5 March 1824)—styled Viscount Woodstock until 1809—was a British Member of Parliament (MP) and peer. Born into the noble Bentinck family, his grandfather William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, served as both Prime Minister of Great Britain and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Expected to succeed his father as the fifth Duke of Portland, Titchfield died at only 27 years old.

Coat of arms of William Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland
Coat of Arms of the Duke of Portland
Notes
The title Duke of Portland was created by George I in 1716 .
Coronet
A Coronet of a Duke
Crest
Out of a ducal coronet proper two arms counter-embowed vested Gules, on the hands gloves Or, each holding an ostrich feather Argent (Bentinck); A snake nowed proper (Cavendish)
Escutcheon
Quarterly: 1st and 4th, Azure a cross moline Argent (Bentinck); 2nd and 3rd, Sable three stags' heads cabossed Argent attired Or, a crescent for difference (Cavendish)
Supporters
Two lions double queued, the dexter Or and the sinister sable
Motto
Craignez Honte (Fear Dishonour)
Ancestors of William Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland
16. William Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland
8. Henry Bentinck, 1st Duke of Portland
17. Anne Villiers
4. William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland
18. Wriothesley Noel, 2nd Earl of Gainsborough
9. Lady Elizabeth Noel
19. The Hon. Catherine Greville
2. William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, Prime Minister of Great Britain
20. Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer
10. Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer
21. Elizabeth Foley
5. Lady Margaret Cavendish Harley
22. John Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle
11. Lady Henrietta Cavendish Holles
23. Lady Margaret Cavendish
1. William Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland
24. William Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Devonshire
12. William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire
25. The Hon. Rachel Russell
6. William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire, Prime Minister of Great Britain
26. John Hoskins
13. Catherine Hoskins
27. Catherine Hale
3. Lady Dorothy Cavendish
28. Charles Boyle, 2nd Earl of Burlington
14. Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington
29. Juliana Noel
7. Charlotte Boyle, 6th Baroness Clifford
30. William Savile, 2nd Marquess of Halifax
15. Lady Dorothy Savile
31. Lady Mary Finch

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.