Will Shields

Will Herthie Shields (born September 15, 1971) is a former college and professional American football player who was an offensive guard in the National Football League (NFL) for fourteen seasons. He played college football for the University of Nebraska, earning consensus All-American honors and winning the Outland Trophy. He played his entire professional career for the NFL's Kansas City Chiefs, and never missed a game in fourteen seasons. Shields was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2011 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2015.

Will Shields
refer to caption
Shields at Whiteman Air Force Base in 2014
No. 68
Position:Guard
Personal information
Born:September 15, 1971 (age 47)
Fort Riley, Kansas
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:315 lb (143 kg)
Career information
High school:Lawton (OK)
College:Nebraska
NFL Draft:1993 / Round: 3 / Pick: 74
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:224
Games started:223
Fumbles recovered:9
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Shields was born in Fort Riley, Kansas.[1] He graduated from Lawton High School in Lawton, Oklahoma,[2] where he played for the Lawton Wolverines high school football team.

College career

While attending the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Shields played for the Nebraska Cornhuskers football team from 1989 through 1992. Shields was a consensus first-team All-American and Outland Trophy winner during his final year at Nebraska. He is one of eight Cornhuskers players to win the Outland Trophy. In 1999, he was selected to the Nebraska All-Century Football Team via fan poll and to the All-Century Nebraska football team by Gannett News Service. In 2002, he was named to the Athlon Sports Nebraska All-Time Team. He is one of only sixteen Cornhuskers to have his jersey retired by the team. In 1999 Shields was selected as an offensive guard to the Walter Camp Football Foundation College Football All Century Team. The other offensive guards selected were John Hannah of Alabama, Aaron Taylor of Nebraska, Brad Budde of USC, Dean Steinkuhler of Nebraska and Jim Parker of Ohio State. Shields was one of six Nebraska Cornhuskers selected to this team; the others being Johnny Rodgers, Dave Rimington, Steinkuhler, Tommie Frazier and Taylor.

Professional career

Shields was the third-round (74th overall) pick of the Kansas City Chiefs in the 1993 NFL Draft,[3] after signing now Minnesota Vikings COO Kevin Warren to be his agent.[4] Shields played for the Chiefs from 1993 to 2006.[5] Beginning with a September 12, 1993 game against the Houston Oilers, he was in the Chiefs' starting lineup for every game, a team record and at the time, the second longest active consecutive starting streak in the NFL behind Brett Favre of the Green Bay Packers. He started 231 straight games (including playoffs) at the right guard position; an NFL record. He went to the Pro Bowl every year from 1995 to 2006, a total of 12, a Chiefs team record, and having played in all of them, he is tied with Champ Bailey and Randall McDaniel for most Pro Bowls played.[6] He was an important part in the Kansas City Chiefs offensive line that consistently led the team to a top 5 finish in rushing offense.

Shields blocked for Marcus Allen, Priest Holmes and Larry Johnson during his career. He had blocked for 1,000-yard rushers for five seasons. He blocked for 4,000-yard passers for five seasons while Elvis Grbac did it in 2000 and Trent Green in 2003, 2004, and 2005. In fourteen seasons, Shields never missed a game, and he failed to start only one contest, his first regular-season outing, as a rookie in 1993.[7] On April 15, 2007, following 14 seasons with the Kansas City Chiefs, he announced his retirement from football.[7]

Life after football

Shields currently owns and operates 68 Inside Sports, a gymnasium and sports facility, in Overland Park, Kansas. Shields is married to his wife Senia (a native of Denmark);[8] they have one daughter, Sanayika, and two sons, Shavon and Solomon. The Shields family resides in Overland Park, Kansas. Shavon played basketball for the University of Nebraska and currently plays professionally in Spain for the Saski Baskonia, while Sanayika is a former basketball player for Drury University.

Honors

References

  1. ^ National Football League, Historical Players, Will Shields. Retrieved February 14, 2012.
  2. ^ databaseFootball.com, Players, Will Shields Archived March 2, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved February 14, 2012.
  3. ^ Pro Football Hall of Fame, Draft History, 1993 National Football League Draft. Retrieved February 14, 2012.
  4. ^ "» Vikings executive Kevin Warren has ties with five hall of fame enshrinees". TwinCities.com. Retrieved February 22, 2017.
  5. ^ Pro-Football-Reference.com, Players, Will Shields. Retrieved February 14, 2012.
  6. ^ "Mind-blowing stats for the 2013 Pro Bowl". National Football League. January 24, 2013. Retrieved January 24, 2013.
  7. ^ a b Len Pasquarelli, "Chiefs guard Shields, a twelve-time Pro Bowler, retires," ESPN.com, (April 16, 2007). Retrieved February 14, 2012.
  8. ^ Palmer, Tod. "Mother's heritage provides opportunity for Sanayika Shields with Danish national team". Kansas City Star.
  9. ^ Pro Football Hall of Fame, Hall of Famers, More Lists, Yearly Finalists. Retrieved February 14, 2012.
  10. ^ "Will Shields to be inducted into Chiefs Hall of Fame". KCTV-TV via website. March 3, 2012. Retrieved March 3, 2012.

External links

1990 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1990 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team represented the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in the 1990 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Tom Osborne and played their home games in Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1991 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1991 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team represented the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in the 1991 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Tom Osborne and played their home games in Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1992 College Football All-America Team

The 1992 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and publications that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1992. It is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1992 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP); (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI); and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WCFF). Other notable selectors included Football News, Gannett News Service (GNS), Scripps Howard (SH), The Sporting News (TSN), and The World Almanac (WA) in conjunction with the Newspaper Enterprise Association.Nine players were selected unanimously by all five official selectors. They are: quarterback Gino Torretta of Miami (FL), running backs Marshall Faulk of San Diego State and Garrison Hearst of Georgia, tight end Chris Gedney of Syracuse, tackle Lincoln Kennedy of Washington, guard Will Shields of Nebraska, linebackers Marcus Buckley of Texas A&M and Marvin Jones of Florida State, and defensive back Carlton McDonald of Air Force. Gino Torretta also won the 1992 Heisman Trophy.

1992 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1992 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team represented the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in the 1992 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Tom Osborne and played their home games in Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1993 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1993 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 24th season in the National Football League and the 34th overall. They improved on their 10-6 record from 1992 and won the AFC West and with an 11-5 record. Kansas City advanced all the way to the AFC Championship before losing to the Buffalo Bills 30–13, which started the Chiefs' NFL record 8 game playoff losing streak. It would be 22 years before the Chiefs would win another playoff game.The season marked the first for new quarterback Joe Montana, who was acquired through a trade with the San Francisco 49ers and running back Marcus Allen from the Los Angeles Raiders, both winners of five Super Bowl championships combined. This would be the last time until 2018 that the Chiefs would appear in the AFC Championship game or win a home playoff game.

1993 NFL Draft

The 1993 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 25–26, 1993, at the Marriot Marquis in New York City, New York. No teams chose to claim any players in the supplemental draft that year, but the New York Giants and Kansas City Chiefs forfeited their first and second round picks, respectively, due to selecting Dave Brown and Darren Mickell in the 1992 supplemental draft.

1996 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1996 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 27th season in the National Football League, and the 37th overall. Following the Chiefs' devastating loss to the colts in the playoffs the year before, the Chiefs failed to improve their 13-3 record from 1995 and finishing 9–7 record and second-place finish in the AFC West. Despite having the team being predicted as one of the eventual winners of Super Bowl XXXI by Sports Illustrated, the team missed the playoffs for the first time since 1989.

1998 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1998 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 39th season in the National Football League, and the 29th overall.

The season began with the team hoping to avenge the loss in the 1998 playoffs to the eventual Super Bowl champion Denver Broncos, but instead the Chiefs failed to succeed in the highly competitive AFC West.

The team finished with a 7–9 record and 4th place in the AFC West. Head coach Marty Schottenheimer announced his resignation following the season after ten seasons with the team and defensive coordinator Gunther Cunningham assumed coaching duties for 1999.

1999 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1999 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 40th season in the National Football League, and the 30th overall.

The season began with the promotion of Defensive coordinator Gunther Cunningham to Head coach following the resignation of Marty Schottenheimer after the 7-9 Chiefs' 1998 season losing record.

The team finished with a 9–7 winning record and 2nd place in the AFC West.

In the final game of the season against the Oakland Raiders, the Chiefs were denied a trip to the playoffs and an AFC West division title when Raiders kicker Joe Nedney kicked a field-goal in overtime. This game also was the final game future hall of fame linebacker Derrick Thomas played in before his death on February 8, 2000.

2000 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 2000 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 31st season in the National Football League, the 41st overall and the second and final season led by head coach Gunther Cunningham.

The team played the season without 9 time Pro Bowl Linebacker and team captain Derrick Thomas because of his death on February 8 of the same year.

2001 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 2001 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 32nd season in the National Football League, the 42nd overall and the first under head coach Dick Vermeil, and failing to qualify for the playoffs or to improve upon their 7–9 record from 2000, with a 6–10 record, which netted them a fourth place finish in the AFC West.

Along with new coaches joining the team, new additions appeared on the Chiefs’ roster, including running back Priest Holmes and quarterback Trent Green. Coach Dick Vermeil began to install a powerful offense similar to the one he installed in St. Louis to win Super Bowl XXXIV.

2003 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 2003 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 34th season in the National Football League, the 44th overall and the third under head coach Dick Vermeil.

The season resulted in a 13–3 winning record, beginning with a nine-game winning streak—the franchise's best start in their 40-year history. The Chiefs won the AFC West and clinched the second seed in the playoffs. Kansas City lost in an offensive shootout at home in the AFC Divisional Playoffs to the Indianapolis Colts 38–31, a game noted for involving no punts from either team's kicking squad.

The season is best remembered for the Chiefs' record-breaking offense. On December 28, running back Priest Holmes broke Marshall Faulk's single-season rushing touchdown record by scoring his 27th rushing touchdown against the Chicago Bears. Quarterback Trent Green threw for 4,000 yards and kick returner Dante Hall returned four kicks for touchdowns. However, the weak Chiefs defense would prove to be too big of weakness, as they failed to stop the Colts in the 2003-04 playoffs.

2004 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 2004 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 45th season, their 42nd in Kansas City, and 35th in the National Football League.

The 2004 season proved not to be as successful as the team's previous season. Though the Chiefs finished the regular season with the most yards and the second highest amount of points, they also had a losing record of 7–9 and no playoff appearance. In fact, the Chiefs' 483 points-scored was the highest total in NFL history for a team that finished the season with a losing record.

2006 All-Pro Team

The 2006 All-Pro Team comprised the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press (AP), Pro Football Writers Association (PFWA), or The Sporting News All-Pro teams in 2006. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. The three teams are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2006, the PFWA and the publication Pro Football Weekly combined their All-Pro teams.

Jerrel Wilson

Jerrel Douglas Wilson (October 4, 1941 – April 9, 2005) was an American football a punter who spent 16 professional seasons, 15 of them with the Kansas City Chiefs, in the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL). Wilson played in college at the University of Southern Mississippi. Nicknamed Thunderfoot, he was selected to three AFL All-Star Teams and three AFC-NFC Pro Bowls. Wilson was elected to the Chiefs Hall of Fame in 1988.His punts were high, booming shots that arched far down the field, potent weapons in the war for field position. Wilson seemed to have the explosiveness of dynamite in his foot, hence the more-than-appropriate nickname of "Thunderfoot." The Southern Mississippi alum was the Chiefs' punter for a team record 15 seasons and is considered one of the best ever to play in the game.

Selected in the 11th round of Kansas City's much heralded 1963 AFL Draft that brought in Hall of Fame members Buck Buchanan and Bobby Bell and fellow Chiefs Hall of Famer Ed Budde, Wilson played more seasons than any player in team history, and his 203 games played are the third most for any player in franchise history behind only guard Will Shields (224) and kicker Nick Lowery (212). He retired with multiple team records including a franchise-record 1,014 punts during his career, highest average yardage in a career with 43.6, in a season with 46.1, in a game with 56.5. Wilson owns the NFL record for most seasons leading the league in punting average with four, leading in 1965, 1968, 1972 and 1973.

Hall of Fame head coach Hank Stram said that Wilson "made other people aware of how important the kicking game was at a time when special times were not given special consideration. I'm prejudiced, but he's the best punter I ever saw. He'll go down in history as the best kicker in the NFL."

Wilson had four career punts of over 70 yards, which included a league leading 72-yard boot in his rookie year. He was named to three Pro Bowl teams in three consecutive years from 1970 to 1972. Wilson was also a reserve running back for the Chiefs and early in his career, accumulating 53 yards on 22 carries spread out over seven seasons. To close his career, Wilson played the 1978 season for the New England Patriots.

Wilson said, regarding his punting style, "The way I attack the football, every time I hit it, I try to bust it, unless I'm around the 50. Then I hit it high. Basically, my power comes from everything. I try to snap everything I have in my body, my hips, knees, everything."

Wilson died of cancer on April 9, 2005, in Bronson, Texas.

Kansas City Chiefs awards

This page details awards won by the Kansas City Chiefs, a professional American football team from the National Football League. The Chiefs have never had a winner of the Coach of the Year award, Offensive Rookie of the Year, Defensive Player of the Year. The Chiefs are tied with the Chicago Bears for the most winners of the Walter Payton Man of the Year award with 5.

The most recent winner of a major NFL award is Patrick Mahomes who won league MVP for the 2018 season, the Chiefs first ever winner of league MVP.

The Chiefs have two awards that are awarded by the team which are voted on by the players and coaches. The Derrick Thomas award is awarded to the team MVP and the Mack Lee Hill award is awarded to the Rookie of the Year.

List of Kansas City Chiefs players

This is a select list of players from the Kansas City Chiefs football team from the National Football League.

For more information, see Kansas City Chiefs.

List of most consecutive starts and games played by National Football League players

This is a list of the most consecutive starts and games played by a player by position in the NFL.Brett Favre's starts streak of 297 games is the longest all-time. Among defensive players, Jim Marshall's starts streak of 270 is the longest all-time. Of special note is punter Jeff Feagles, who played in 352 consecutive games which is the longest of all-time for a special teams player. Special teams players are not credited with starts in the NFL. In 2018, Ryan Kerrigan became the most recent player to surpass someone at his position for consecutive starts, having broken the previous mark for left outside linebackers previously held by Jason Gildon.Updated through 2018 season

Bold denotes an active streak

Nebraska Cornhuskers football

The Nebraska Cornhuskers football team represents the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. Among the 128 Division I-FBS teams, Nebraska is one of ten football programs to win 800 or more games. Nebraska has more victories against Power Five opponents than any other program, as well as the fifth most victories all-time, behind only Michigan, Ohio State, Texas, and Alabama. Two of Nebraska's national championship-winning teams, the 1971 and 1995 teams, are listed by many as the best college football teams of all time.Nebraska claims 46 conference championships and five national championships: 1970, 1971, 1994, 1995, and 1997. The titles in the 1990s marked the first time that a team won three national championships in four seasons since Notre Dame in 1946–49, and one of only three instances a team has won back-to-back consensus national titles. Nebraska has won nine other national championships that the school does not claim. They are the only school with five or more national championships to not have a loss in any of their title seasons.

Nebraska has had five undefeated seasons in which they were not national champions: 1902, 1903, 1913, 1914, and 1915. Between 1912 and 1916, the Cornhuskers played 34 consecutive games without suffering a loss.Famous Cornhuskers include Heisman Trophy winners Johnny Rodgers, Mike Rozier, and Eric Crouch. Rodgers was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame and was voted the Nebraska "Player of the Century" in 1999. Rozier, who holds the all-time NCAA record for yards per carry, was likewise inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2006. Other Cornhusker players and coaches who are Hall of Famers include: Forrest Behm, Bob Brown, Guy Chamberlin, Sam Francis, Tommie Frazier, Rich Glover, Wayne Meylan, Bobby Reynolds, Dave Rimington, George Sauer, Will Shields, Clarence Swanson, Ed Weir, Grant Wistrom, and coaches Gomer Jones, Pete Elliott, Francis Schmidt, Dana X. Bible, Bob Devaney, Biff Jones, Tom Osborne, Eddie N. Robinson and Fielding H. Yost.Since June 11, 2010 the University of Nebraska has been a member of the Big Ten Conference, previously affiliated with the Big 12. They are grouped in the Big Ten West Division, along with Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Northwestern, Purdue, and Wisconsin.

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