Wild pitch

In baseball, a wild pitch (WP) is charged against a pitcher when his pitch is too high, too short, or too wide of home plate for the catcher to control with ordinary effort, thereby allowing a baserunner, perhaps even the batter-runner on an uncaught third strike, to advance.

A wild pitch usually passes the catcher behind home plate, often allowing runners on base an easy chance to advance while the catcher chases the ball down. Sometimes the catcher may block a pitch, and the ball may be nearby, but the catcher has trouble finding the ball, allowing runners to advance.

A closely related statistic is the passed ball. As with many baseball statistics, whether a pitch that gets away from a catcher is counted as a wild pitch or a passed ball is at the discretion of the official scorer. The benefit of the doubt is usually given to the catcher if there is uncertainty; therefore, most of these situations are scored as wild pitches. If the pitch was so low as to touch the ground, or so high that the catcher has to jump to get to it, or so wide that the catcher has to lunge for it, it is usually then considered a wild pitch and not a passed ball. Because the pitcher and catcher handle the ball much more than other fielders, certain misplays on pitched balls are defined in Rule 10.13 as wild pitches and passed balls. No error shall be charged when a wild pitch or passed ball is scored.

Cannon Ball Stemmeyer
Bill Stemmyer threw an MLB-record 63 wild pitches in one season.

A wild pitch may only be scored if one or more runners advance. If the bases are empty, or the catcher retrieves the ball quickly and the runner(s) are unable to advance, a wild pitch is not charged. A scored run due to a wild pitch is recorded as an earned run. A runner who advances on a wild pitch is not credited with a stolen base unless he breaks before the pitcher begins his delivery.

Wild pitch (9331552726)
A wild pitch goes past the catcher

Records

Nolan Ryan is the modern-era leader in the category, throwing 277 wild pitches over his 27 years in Major League Baseball. He also led his league in the category in six different seasons. However, the all-time record belongs to Tony Mullane, who threw 343 in the early years of the game from 1881 to 1894. After Ryan's 277, the next pitcher on the list is Mickey Welch 274, followed by Tim Keefe's 233.

Bill Stemmyer still holds the single-season record, throwing 63 wild pitches in 1886. Since 1900, however, the highest total in a season has been 30 (by Red Ames in 1905). The modern record in a single game is 6, held by three different pitchers.

R.A. Dickey, Phil Niekro, Walter Johnson, and Kevin Gregg all hold the modern-era regular season single inning wild pitch record with four. Rick Ankiel, however, threw five wild pitches in the 3rd inning of the first game of the 2000 NLDS. Bert Cunningham of the Players' League (considered a major league) in 1890 also threw five in an inning. Adam Ottavino on June 26, 2017 set the MLB record of five runs scored on four wild pitches.

The current active leader (prior to the 2017 season) is Félix Hernández, with 132 wild pitches. The only other active pitchers with 100+ wild pitches are John Lackey with 114 and Tim Lincecum with 107.

Sources

External links

Base on balls

A base on balls (BB), also known as a walk, occurs in baseball when a batter receives four pitches that the umpire calls balls, and is in turn awarded first base without the possibility of being called out. The base on balls is defined in Section 2.00 of baseball's Official Rules, and further detail is given in 6.08(a). It is, however, considered a faux pas for a professional player to actually walk to first base; the batter-runner and any advancing runners normally jog on such a play.The term "base on balls" distinguishes a walk from the other manners in which a batter can be awarded first base without liability to be put out (e.g., hit by pitch (HBP), catcher's interference). Though a base on balls, catcher's interference, or a batter hit by a pitched ball all result in the batter (and possibly runners on base) being awarded a base, the term "walk" usually refers only to a base on balls, and not the other methods of reaching base without the bat touching the ball. An important difference is that for a hit batter or catcher's interference, the ball is dead and no one may advance unless forced; the ball is live after a walk (see below for details).

A batter who draws a base on balls is commonly said to have been "walked" by the pitcher. When the batter is walked, runners advance one base without liability to be put out only if forced to vacate their base to allow the batter to take first base. If a batter draws a walk with the bases loaded, all preceding runners are forced to advance, including the runner on third base who is forced to home plate to score a run; when a run is forced on a walk, the batter is credited with an RBI per rule 10.04.Receiving a base on balls does not count as a hit or an at bat for a batter but does count as a time on base and a plate appearance. Therefore, a base on balls does not affect a player's batting average, but it can increase his on-base percentage.A hit by pitch is not counted statistically as a walk, though the effect is mostly the same, with the batter receiving a free pass to first base. One exception is that on a HBP (hit-by-pitch), the ball is dead. On a HBP, any runners attempting to steal on the play must return to their original base unless forced to the next base anyway. When a walk occurs, the ball is still live: any runner not forced to advance may nevertheless attempt to advance at his own risk, which might occur on a steal play, passed ball, or wild pitch. Also, because a ball is live when a base on balls occurs, runners on base forced to advance one base may attempt to advance beyond one base, at their own risk. The batter-runner himself may attempt to advance beyond first base, at his own risk. Rule 6.08 addresses this matter as well. An attempt to advance an additional base beyond the base awarded might occur when ball four is a passed ball or a wild pitch.

Bob Moose

Robert "Bob" Ralph Moose Jr. (October 9, 1947 – October 9, 1976) was a Major League Baseball pitcher from 1967 to 1976. Moose spent his entire career with the Pittsburgh Pirates. His best season came in 1969 when he posted a 14–3 won-loss record and a 2.91 Earned Run Average working equally as a starter and reliever. On September 20 of that year, he no-hit the eventual World Series champion New York Mets. He is also known for his wild pitch in the bottom half of the ninth inning which allowed George Foster to score the winning run in the fifth and deciding game of the 1972 NLCS, sending the Cincinnati Reds to the World Series after Pittsburgh had a one-run lead entering the bottom of the ninth.During the 1974 season, Moose suffered a blood clot under the shoulder of his pitching arm. Surgery was required to remove the clot plus one of Moose's ribs.Moose was killed in an auto accident on Ohio Route 7 in Martins Ferry heading to Bill Mazeroski's golf course in Rayland, Ohio, on his 29th birthday.

Bob Stanley (baseball)

Robert William "Bob" Stanley (born November 10, 1954) is an American former professional baseball relief pitcher who played for the Boston Red Sox. He is currently the pitching coach for the Buffalo Bisons, Triple-A affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays.

With the Red Sox one strike away from winning the 1986 World Series, Stanley threw a wild pitch that allowed the New York Mets to score the tying run in Game 6. This ironically turned the tables on the Red Sox from what they themselves had done against the California Angels in Game 5 of the American League Championship Series just weeks earlier.

Breaking Atoms

Breaking Atoms is the debut album of Canadian/American hip hop group Main Source, released July 23, 1991 on Wild Pitch Records. Production for it was handled by the group and took place during 1990 to 1991 at Homeboy Studio, Power Play Studios, and Libra Digital in New York City. Recorded during the golden age of hip hop, Breaking Atoms is distinguished stylistically by its incorporation of jazz and soul music samples. The album has been highly regarded by music writers due mostly to its production, whose heavy and original use of sampling influenced hip hop producers for a considerable portion of the 1990s.

The album has been widely regarded by writers and music critics as a significantly influential album and has been noted for debuting rapper Nas, who appears on the track "Live at the Barbeque". His contribution to the song was sampled on "Genesis", the intro track to his debut album Illmatic (1994). Breaking Atoms has been recognized as one of the most important records in hip hop history, and was out of print in the United States after the demise of Wild Pitch Records in 1997. It was reissued on April 22, 2008 through Fontana Distribution.

Caught stealing

In baseball, a runner is charged, and the fielders involved are credited, with a time caught stealing when the runner attempts to advance or lead off from one base to another without the ball being batted and then is tagged out by a fielder while making the attempt. A time caught stealing cannot be charged to a batter-runner, a runner who is still advancing as the direct result of reaching base. In baseball statistics, caught stealing is denoted by CS. MLB began tracking caught stealing in 1951.

More specifically, a time caught stealing is charged when:

a runner, attempting a stolen base, is put out;

a runner is caught in a rundown play while stealing, and is tagged out; or

a runner, attempting a stolen base, is safe because a fielder is charged with an error on catching the ball, and in the judgment of the official scorer, the runner would have been out if the ball had been caught. (This official scoring is almost never made; an error is usually only charged if a bad throw or catch allows the runner to take an additional base, e.g., the runner attempts to steal second, the ball goes into the outfield, and the runner takes third as well. In such an instance the runner is credited with a steal of second, with the error accounting for the advance to third.)Rickey Henderson is the all-time leader in getting caught stealing (335 times). The current active leader is José Reyes of the New York Mets with 119 times caught. These two players are also the all-time and active leaders, respectively, for successful steal attempts.

Chill Rob G

Robert Frazier (born May 15), known professionally as Chill Rob G, is a hip hop artist from Jersey City, New Jersey.

Gang Starr

Gang Starr was an American hip hop duo, originating in Brooklyn, New York , consisting of MC Guru and DJ/producer DJ Premier. Some of their top hits include "Mass Appeal", "Take It Personal" and "Above The Clouds".

Kill My Landlord

Kill My Landlord is the debut studio album by American hip hop group The Coup. It was released on Wild Pitch Records on May 4, 1993. It peaked at number 83 on the Billboard Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart.

List of Los Angeles Angels no-hitters

The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Anaheim, California near Los Angeles. Formed in 1961, they play in the American League West division. Also known in their early years as Los Angeles Angels (1961–65), California Angels (1966–96), and Anaheim Angels (1997–2004), pitchers for the Angels have thrown 10 no-hitters in franchise history. A no-hitter is officially recognized by Major League Baseball only "when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings", though one or more batters "may reach base via a walk, an error, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference". No-hitters of less than nine complete innings were previously recognized by the league as official; however, several rule alterations in 1991 changed the rule to its current form. A no-hitter is rare enough that one team in Major League Baseball has never had a pitcher accomplish the feat. Mike Witt threw the only perfect game, a special subcategory of no-hitter, in Angels history on September 30, 1984. As defined by Major League Baseball, "in a perfect game, no batter reaches any base during the course of the game."Bo Belinsky threw the first no-hitter in Angels history on May 5, 1962; the most recent no-hitter was thrown in a combined effort by Taylor Cole and Félix Peña on July 12, 2019. Two left-handed starting pitchers have thrown no-hitters in franchise history. The longest interval between no-hitters was between the games pitched by Langston/Witt and Santana, encompassing more than 21 years from April 11, 1990 till July 27, 2011. Conversely, the shortest interval between no-hitters was between the games pitched by Nolan Ryan, encompassing 2 months from May 15, 1973 to July 15, 1973. They no-hit the Baltimore Orioles the most, which occurred twice, which were no-hit by Belinsky in 1962 and Nolan Ryan in 1975. There has been one no-hitter in which the team allowed at least a run. Ervin Santana's no-hitter on July 27, 2011 had an unearned run score on a wild pitch in the first inning, but then Santana settled down and completed his rare feat. The most baserunners allowed in a no-hitter was by Ryan (in 1974), who allowed eight. Six no-hitters were thrown at home, and four were thrown on the road. They threw one in April, three in May, one in June, three in July, and two in September. Of the 10 no-hitters, three have been won by a score of 1–0, more common than any other results. The largest margin of victory in a no-hitter was 13–0 win by Cole and Peña on July 12, 2019. The smallest margin of victory was 1–0 wins by Ryan in 1975, Mike Witt in 1984 and a combined no-hitter led by Langston in 1990.

The umpire is also an integral part of any no-hitter. The task of the umpire in a baseball game is to make any decision "which involves judgment, such as, but not limited to, whether a batted ball is fair or foul, whether a pitch is a strike or a ball, or whether a runner is safe or out… [the umpire's judgment on such matters] is final." Part of the duties of the umpire making calls at home plate includes defining the strike zone, which "is defined as that area over homeplate (sic) the upper limit of which is a horizontal line at the midpoint between the top of the shoulders and the top of the uniform pants, and the lower level is a line at the hollow beneath the kneecap." These calls define every baseball game and are therefore integral to the completion of any no-hitter. A different umpire presided over each of the franchise's ten no-hitters.

The manager is another integral part of any no-hitter. The tasks of the manager include determining the starting rotation as well as batting order and defensive lineup every game. Seven different managers have been involved in the franchise's ten no-hitters.

List of Major League Baseball career wild pitches leaders

In baseball, a wild pitch (abbreviated WP) is charged against a pitcher when his pitch is too high, too short, or too wide of home plate for the catcher to control with ordinary effort, thereby allowing a baserunner, perhaps even the batter-runner on an uncaught third strike, to advance. A wild pitch usually passes the catcher behind home plate, often allowing runners on base an easy chance to advance while the catcher chases the ball down. Sometimes the catcher may block a pitch, and the ball may be nearby, but the catcher has trouble finding the ball, allowing runners to advance.

Tony Mullane is the all-time leader in wild pitches with 343 career. Mullane is also the only player to throw more than 300 career wild pitches.

Lord Finesse

Lord Finesse (born Robert Hall Jr., February 19, 1970) is an American rapper and hip-hop record producer from The Bronx, New York best known as the leader of the D.I.T.C. crew. About.com ranked him number 29 on its list of the Top-50 Hip-Hop Producers.

Main Source

Main Source is a Canadian/American hip hop group based in New York City/Toronto, composed of Toronto DJs and producers, Sir Scratch and K-Cut, and Queens MC and producer Large Professor. Later, MC Mikey D (also from Queens) replaced Large Professor.

No More Mr. Nice Guy (Gang Starr album)

No More Mr. Nice Guy is the debut album by hip hop duo Gang Starr. The album was released on June 1989; and it peaked at #83 on the Billboard R&B chart. The song "Positivity" peaked at #19 on the Billboard rap chart.

Passed ball

In baseball, a catcher is charged with a passed ball when he fails to hold or control a legally pitched ball that, with ordinary effort, should have been maintained under his control, and, as a result of this loss of control, the batter or a runner on base advances. A runner who advances due to a passed ball is not credited with a stolen base unless he breaks for the base before the pitcher begins his delivery.

Stolen base

In baseball, a stolen base occurs when a runner advances to a base to which he is not entitled and the official scorer rules that the advance should be credited to the action of the runner. The umpires determine whether the runner is safe or out at the next base, but the official scorer rules on the question of credit or blame for the advance under Rule 10.A stolen base most often occurs when a base runner advances to the next base while the pitcher is pitching the ball to home plate.

Successful base stealers are not only fast but have good baserunning instincts and timing.

The Four Horsemen (album)

The Four Horsemen is the third studio album by American hip hop group Ultramagnetic MCs. It was released on August 10, 1993 via Wild Pitch Records. Audio production was handled by Ultramagnetic MCs, except for four tracks produced by Godfather Don, who helped to incorporate a darker, jazzier sound than the group's previous work. "Checkin' My Style" and "See the Man on the Street" were originally recorded in 1992 during Godfather Don-produced sessions for a projected solo album for Kool Keith's alias Rhythm X. Those same sessions also produced songs released on Cenobites LP, the CD edition of which contains the original extended version of "Checkin' My Style," retitled "Return To Zero." The Four Horsemen includes recurring science fiction and baseball themes and was viewed by fans as a welcome return to the group's hardcore roots. Because of a manufacturing error, the current Fontana Distribution pressing is identified as the U.M.C.'s on the covering sticker under the shrink wrap. The album peaked at number 55 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums and number 15 on the Heatseekers Albums.

The U.M.C.'s

The UMC's was an American hip hop duo from the borough of Staten Island in New York City.

The group was composed of Haas G and Kool Kim, who released the critically acclaimed full-length album Fruits of Nature in 1991, which garnered chart success with the duo's #1 Billboard Hot Rap Single "Blue Cheese" and #2 Hot Rap Single "One To Grow On." (which contains a sample from "Ursalena" by Bill Cosby) In 1994, the duo released its second album, Unleashed but split up soon after.

Since the group's break-up, Haas G (under the names Hassan and Fantom of the Beat) has focused on producing music, most notably garnering a #1 hit for Lil' Kim featuring 50 Cent, with "Magic Stick". Kool Kim reinvented himself as the controversial underground emcee NYOIL.

Ultramagnetic MCs

The Ultramagnetic MCs is an American hip hop group based in Bronx, New York. Founded by Kool Keith, the group also includes Ced Gee, TR Love, and Moe Love. Tim Dog became an unofficial member in 1989. In 1990, DJ Jaycee was added as Roadmanager and backup DJ. Big.D was put down with the crew by Kool Keith in 1989. In 2006 Kool Keith and Big.D formed the supergroup The Commissioner, and in 1999 Big.D and D.J Moe-Love also formed the powerhouse group Slaughterhouse-Cartel. A former member, Rooney Roon, was fired following an assault arrest. Beat-boxing legend Rahzel was also involved with the group early in its career. The group's work was associated with unorthodox sampling, polysyllabic rhymes, and bizarre lyrical imagery.

Wild Pitch Records

Wild Pitch Records was a hip hop record label started in 1987 by Stuart Fine that was eventually distributed by EMI. Artists who released records on the label included Main Source, Lord Finesse, Ultramagnetic MCs, Chill Rob G, Gang Starr, UMCs, O.C., Brokin English Klik, Hard Knocks, Super Lover Cee and Casanova Rud, and The Coup. Together, Fine and Howard reestablished and released the label's catalogue, while also releasing records by Mary Lees Corvette, BigMouth, Mighty Purple, the Wallmans, and Chico Hamilton under its All Points Jazz label. The hip hop catalogue was eventually acquired by Jay Faires, who tried to reactivate it as part of his short-lived JCOR Entertainment label. Since the majority of its albums were released in the early 1990s and went out of print, Faires re-released the label's catalog on April 22, 2008, through Fontana Distribution.

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