Wilcy Moore

William Wilcy "Cy" Moore (May 20, 1897 – March 29, 1963) was a professional baseball right-handed pitcher over parts of six seasons (1927–1933) with the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox. He led the American League in ERA as a rookie in 1927 while playing for New York.

Moore was a member of the 1927 New York Yankees, frequently referred to as Major League Baseball's greatest team of all time. He made his MLB debut on April 14 of that season and proceeded to win 19 games, with Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig among his teammates. Moore was the winning pitcher in Game 4 of the 1927 World Series, pitching all nine innings for the champion Yankees against the Pittsburgh Pirates. New York won the game in the bottom of the ninth inning on a wild pitch.

He also won the fourth and final game of the 1932 World Series, in which the Yankees defeated the Chicago Cubs.

Primarily a relief pitcher, Moore was a member of the Yankee staff during the 1928 World Series as well, but was not needed as the team's starting pitchers threw four consecutive complete games.

He was traded by the Yankees on November 21, 1929, who reacquired him on August. 1, 1932.

For his career, he compiled a 51–44 record, with a 3.70 ERA and 204 strikeouts. In his two World Series, he went 2–0 in three appearances with a 0.56 ERA.

When scouted in 1926, Moore claimed he was 27, but records have proven that his actual age was then 29.

He was born in Bonita, Texas and later died in Hollis, Oklahoma at the age of 65.

Wilcy Moore
Wilcy Moore 1927.jpeg
Pitcher
Born: May 20, 1897
Bonita, Texas
Died: March 29, 1963 (aged 65)
Hollis, Oklahoma
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 14, 1927, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
September 28, 1933, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Win–loss record51–44
Earned run average3.70
Strikeouts204
Saves49
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

External links

1897 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1897 throughout the world.

1927 Major League Baseball season

The 1927 Major League Baseball season began in April 1927 and ended with the World Series in October. No no-hitters were thrown during the season.

The New York Yankees, whose lineup featured Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, dominated the American League with 110 wins. The Yankees swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in the World Series.

1927 New York Yankees season

The 1927 New York Yankees season was their 25th season. The team finished with a record of 110–44, winning their fifth pennant and finishing 19 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics and were tied for first or better for the whole season. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the Pittsburgh Pirates. This Yankees team is known for their feared lineup, which was nicknamed "Murderers' Row". This team is widely considered to be the best baseball team in the history of MLB.

1927 World Series

In the 1927 World Series, the New York Yankees swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in four games. This was the first sweep of a National League team by an American League team.

That year, the Yankees led the American League in runs scored, hits, triples, home runs, base on balls, batting average, slugging average and on-base percentage. It featured legends Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig at their peaks. The team won a then-league record 110 games, finished with a 19-game lead over second place, and are considered by many to be the greatest team in the history of baseball.

The 1927 Pittsburgh Pirates, with MVP Paul Waner, led the National League in runs, hits, batting average and on-base percentage.

1928 New York Yankees season

The New York Yankees' 1928 season was their 26th season. The team finished with a record of 101–53, winning their sixth pennant, finishing 2.5 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the St. Louis Cardinals. Pitcher Urban Shocker died in September due to complications from pneumonia.

1929 New York Yankees season

The 1929 New York Yankees season was the team's 27th season in New York and its 29th overall. The team finished with a record of 88–66, finishing in second place, 18 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics. This ended a streak of three straight World Series appearances for the club. New York was managed by Miller Huggins until his death on September 25. They played at Yankee Stadium.

1931 Boston Red Sox season

The 1931 Boston Red Sox season was the 31st season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished sixth in the American League (AL) with a record of 62 wins and 90 losses.

1931 Major League Baseball season

The 1931 Major League Baseball season.

1932 Boston Red Sox season

The 1932 Boston Red Sox season was the 32nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 43 wins and 111 losses. The team set franchise records for fewest wins, most losses, and lowest winning percentage (.279) in a season—these records still stand through the end of the 2018 season.

1932 New York Yankees season

The 1932 New York Yankees season was the team's 30th season in New York, and its 32nd season overall. The team finished with a record of 107–47, winning their seventh pennant, finishing 13 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by future Hall of Famer Joe McCarthy. A record nine future Hall of Famers played on the team (Earle Combs, Bill Dickey, Lou Gehrig, Lefty Gomez, Tony Lazzeri, Herb Pennock, Red Ruffing, Babe Ruth, Joe Sewell).

The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the Chicago Cubs. They are the only major-league team ever to go an entire season without being shut out.

1932 World Series

The 1932 World Series was a four-game sweep by the American League champions New York Yankees over the National League champions Chicago Cubs. By far its most noteworthy moment was Babe Ruth's "called shot" home run, in his 10th and last World Series. It was punctuated by fiery arguments between the two teams, heating up the atmosphere before the World Series even began. A record 13 future Hall of Famers played in this Series, with three other future Hall of Famers also participating: umpire Bill Klem; Yankee's manager Joe McCarthy; and Cubs manager Rogers Hornsby. It was also the first in which both teams wore uniforms with numbers on the backs of the shirts.

1933 New York Yankees season

The 1933 New York Yankees season was the team's 31st season in New York and its 33rd season overall. The team finished with a record of 91–59, finishing 7 games behind the Washington Senators. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

Bob Kline

Robert George Kline [Junior] (December 9, 1909 – March 16, 1987) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for three teams between the 1930 and 1934 seasons. Listed at 6' 3", 200 lb., Kline batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Enterprise, Ohio.

Bonita, Texas

Bonita is an unincorporated community in north central Montague County, Texas, United States north of U.S. Route 82 on Farm to Market Road 1815.

Gordon Rhodes

John Gordon Rhodes [Dusty] (August 11, 1907 – March 22, 1960) was a starting pitcher in Major League who played from 1929 through 1936 for the New York Yankees (1929–1932), Boston Red Sox (1932–1935) and Philadelphia Athletics (1936). Listed at 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m), 187 lb., Rhodes batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Winnemucca, Nevada.

List of Major League Baseball annual saves leaders

The following is a list of annual leaders in saves in Major League Baseball (MLB), with separate lists for the American League and the National League. The list also includes several professional leagues and associations that were never part of MLB.

In baseball, a save is credited to a pitcher who finishes a game for the winning team under prescribed circumstances. Most commonly a relief pitcher ("reliever") earns a save by entering in the ninth inning of a game in which his team is winning by three or fewer runs and finishing the game by pitching one inning without losing the lead. The statistic was created by Jerome Holtzman in 1959 to "measure the effectiveness of relief pitchers" and was adopted as an MLB official statistic in 1969. The save has been retroactively measured for pitchers before that date.

MLB recognizes the player or players in each league with the most saves each season. In retrospect, the five saves by Jack Manning meant he led the National League in its inaugural year, while Bill Hoffer was the American League's first saves champion with three. Mordecai Brown was the first pitcher to record at least 10 saves in a season. Dan Quisenberry, Bruce Sutter, Firpo Marberry, and Ed Walsh are the only pitchers to lead the league in saves five times (though Marberry and Walsh did so before 1969). Sutter is also tied with Harry Wright, Dan Quisenberry and Craig Kimbrel for the most consecutive seasons leading the league in saves with four.

Murderers' Row

Murderers' Row were the baseball teams of the New York Yankees in the late 1920s, widely considered one of the best teams in history. The nickname is in particular describing the first six hitters in the 1927 team lineup: Earle Combs, Mark Koenig, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Bob Meusel, and Tony Lazzeri.

Okmulgee Drillers

The Okmulgee Drillers were a minor league baseball team that played in the Western Association from 1920 to 1927. They were based in Okmulgee, Oklahoma. In 1922, they played at Athletic Park, and from 1923 to 1927, they played at Petrolia Park.

Under managers Whitey Hensling and Ed Brennan in 1920, the Drillers went 83-46, finishing first in the standings. They tied for the league championship that season. In 1921, they had three or four different managers. One source says they were managed by Frank Herriott, Harry Womack and Johnny Wuffli, while another says Ed Klepfer managed them as well. They finished seventh in the standings that season, going 71-76. Under managers Wuffli and Troy Agnew in 1922, the Drillers finished fifth in the standings, going 56-79. They improved drastically in 1923 under manager Agnew, going 81-63 and finishing third in the league. They made it to the league finals, but lost.

The Drillers' 1924 team is recognized as being the 49th greatest minor league team of all time. Under manager Agnew, they finished 110-48 that season, good for first in the league. They performed well in the postseason, winning the league championship. They were led offensively by Bud Davis and Cecil Davis, who hit .400 with 51 home runs and 190 RBI and .364 with 51 home runs and 162 RBI, respectively. Joe Bratcher hit .383 with 23 home runs and Bill Stellbauer hit .369 with 32 home runs as well. Their pitcher staff featured three twenty game winners: Guy Cantrell (21-7, 4.57 ERA), Jim Lyle (23-13, 3.97 ERA) and perhaps their best pitcher, Jim Walkup (23-3, 2.60 ERA). Wilcy Moore also went 17-6, and Walt Tauscher went 12-4.The Drillers would never again match the success they had in 1924. In 1925, they finished with an 80-71 record under managers Roy Corgan and Red Snapp, placing third in the league. Under Chick Mattick in 1926, they finished fourth in the league with a 73-85 record, and in 1927 they finished fifth in the league with a 57-75 record under manager Troy Agnew.

Paris Snappers

The Paris Snappers were a minor league baseball team that played in the Texas–Oklahoma League (1914, 1921–1922) and Lone Star League (1927). In 1921, 1922 and 1927, the squad was managed by Red Snapp, after whom the team was nicknamed. The squad won the league championship in 1921. Notable players include Sam Gray, George Harper, Dickey Kerr and Wilcy Moore.

The team was based in Paris, Texas, United States.

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