whitehouse.gov

whitehouse.gov is the official website of the White House and is owned by the United States government. Launched in October 1994,[4] it contains information about the President, the Vice President, their families, press releases, proclamations, executive orders, and some speeches by White House officials. It has the official web sites of several offices in the Executive Office of the President, such as the Office of Management and Budget and the Office of Science and Technology Policy.

The website has been completely redesigned for each new president. Websites for former presidents in office are moved to archive versions.[5] Up to late June 2018, the archived Obama White House homepage, https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/, contained no menu linking to the archived content (though such content did exist, e.g., https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/the-record/climate). In 2011, the website was considered among the best of the United States federal government.[6]

The content of the website is in the public domain or licensed under Creative Commons Attribution license.[7]

Whitehouse.gov
Wh.gov emblem
Whitehouse.gov January 2018
Opening page as of January 2018
Type of site
Government
Available inEnglish, Spanish (Formerly)a
OwnerFederal government of the United States
Websitewhitehouse.gov
Alexa rankPositive decrease 2,167 (March 2017)[1]
CommercialNo
LaunchedOctober 20, 1994[2][3]
Current statusActive
Whitehouse.gov during Clinton administration
The website during the presidency of Bill Clinton, 1995
White House.gov opening screen full 1-20-09
The website following the inauguration of Barack Obama, January 20, 2009

Content

The current administration's website is broken into the following sections:

  • The Briefing Room
  • Issues
  • The Administration
  • 1600 Penn
  • Participate

Platform

In July 2001,[8] the White House started switching their web servers to an operating system based on Red Hat Linux and using the Apache HTTP Server.[9] The installation was completed in February 2009.[10][11] In October 2009, the White House servers adopted Drupal, a free and open-source content management system,[12][13] which runs on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.[14]

In December 2017, the Trump administration launched a redesigned website which it claims will save taxpayers "as much $3 million annually". [15]

Civic engagement

On September 1, 2011, David Plouffe announced in an email that the White House is releasing "We the People" to allow public petitions on whitehouse.gov. The launch of the petitioning platform was announced by Katelyn Sabochik September 22, 2011 in a White House blog post.[16]

See also

Notes

^a A Spanish version of whitehouse.gov was used during the Bush and Obama administrations. Since January 20, 2017, the Spanish version of whitehouse.gov was removed although there has been archived Spanish versions of the website from the Bush and Obama administrations.

References

  1. ^ "Whitehouse.gov Site Info". Alexa Internet. Retrieved March 8, 2017.
  2. ^ "Vice President Unveils First Interactive Citizens' Handbook". The White House, Office of the Vice President. October 20, 1994. Retrieved February 15, 2011.
  3. ^ "WhiteHouse.gov WHOIS, DNS, & Domain Info - DomainTools". WHOIS. Retrieved September 20, 2016.
  4. ^ "Scout Report: Week ending October 21, 1994". October 21, 1994. Retrieved December 28, 2008.
  5. ^ "The Digital Transition: How the Presidential Transition Works in the Social Media Age". archives.gov. October 31, 2016. Retrieved January 24, 2017.
  6. ^ Mordecai Lee; Grant Neeley; Kendra Stewart (4 August 2011). The Practice of Government Public Relations. CRC Press. pp. 64–. ISBN 978-1-4398-3466-4.
  7. ^ "Copyright Policy". whitehouse.gov. January 16, 2017. Retrieved January 24, 2017.
  8. ^ John Leyden (2001-07-24). "White House Web site moves to Linux". The Register. Retrieved 2011-08-26.
  9. ^ Savio Rodrigues (2009-10-28). "How Whitehouse.gov Will Bring Open Source To The American Spotlight". LinuxProNews.com. Retrieved 2011-08-26.
  10. ^ Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols (2009-10-29). "Obama Invites Open Source into the White House". PC World. Retrieved 2011-08-26.
  11. ^ Netcraft (2011-08-26). "OS, Web Server and Hosting History for whitehouse.gov". Netcraft. Retrieved 2011-08-26.
  12. ^ OSTP Director John P. Holdren (2010-04-07). "Office of Science & Technology - Open Government Plan". The White House. Retrieved 2011-08-26.
  13. ^ Justin Ryan (2010-04-22). "Oval Office Goes Open Source". Linux Journal. Retrieved 2011-08-26.
  14. ^ "Red Hat's Decade of Collaboration with Government and the Open Source Community". Red Hat. Retrieved 2017-07-29.
  15. ^ "White House website redesigned to save taxpayers '$3 million per year'". Washington Examiner. 14 December 2017. Retrieved 17 July 2018.
  16. ^ "White House blog press release regarding the new "We the People" petitioning platform". WhiteHouse.gov. September 22, 2011.

External links

Energy policy of the Barack Obama administration

The Energy Policy of the Obama administration.On April 13, 2015, in honor the black history month of the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, the Obama Administration website summarized the initiatives that the administration is taking or has undertaken:

• A $3.4 billion Smart Grid Investment Grant (part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009), which would affect 49 states and has the potential to reduce electricity use by more than 4% by 2033,

• The launch of the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) project under the Department of Energy and in collaboration with the Department of Defense, modeled after the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency,

• A new report on how the federal government can help create a "self-sustaining home energy efficiency retrofit industry"

• New efficiency standards for home appliances,

• A new National Fuel Efficiency Policy that will apply to cars from model years 2012-2016 and will ultimately require cars to have an average fuel efficiency of 35.5 mpg by 2016,

• Three measures to increase the production of biofuels: a renewable fuels standard, biomass crop assistance program, and a biofuels working group. The President has also created an interagency task force to help create a federal strategy for carbon capture and storage, and

• A new Environmental Protection Agency ruling (called the Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Rule) requiring the reporting of greenhouse gas emissions by major emitters in the United States.

Lisa Monaco

Lisa Oudens Monaco (born February 25, 1968) is an American federal prosecutor who was the United States Homeland Security Advisor to President Barack Obama; the chief counterterrorism advisor to the President, and a statutory member of the United States Homeland Security Council.

Monaco previously served as the Assistant Attorney General for National Security from 2011 to 2013, and as the Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the Justice Department. In 2017, Monaco became a senior national security analyst for CNN.

List of Donald Trump nominees who have withdrawn

The Trump administration has proposed an unusually high number of nominees to appointed positions who have been rejected by the Senate or withdrawn voluntarily.

List of Presidents of the United States

The President of the United States is the head of state and head of government of the United States, indirectly elected to a four-year term by the people through the Electoral College. The officeholder leads the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.

Since the office was established in 1789, 44 men have served as president. The first, George Washington, won a unanimous vote of the Electoral College. Grover Cleveland served two non-consecutive terms in office and is therefore counted as the 22nd and 24th President of the United States; the 45th and current president is Donald Trump (since January 20, 2017). There are currently four living former presidents. The most recent former president to die was George H. W. Bush on November 30, 2018.

The presidency of William Henry Harrison, who died 31 days after taking office in 1841, was the shortest in American history. Franklin D. Roosevelt served the longest, over twelve years, before dying early in his fourth term in 1945. He is the only U.S. president to have served more than two terms. Since the ratification of the Twenty-second Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1951, no person may be elected president more than twice and no one who has served more than two years of a term to which someone else was elected may be elected more than once.Of those who have served as the nation's president, four died in office of natural causes (William Henry Harrison, Zachary Taylor, Warren G. Harding, and Franklin D. Roosevelt), four were assassinated (Abraham Lincoln, James A. Garfield, William McKinley and John F. Kennedy), and one resigned (Richard Nixon facing impeachment). John Tyler was the first vice president to assume the presidency during a presidential term, and set the precedent that a vice president who does so becomes the fully functioning president with his own presidency, as opposed to a caretaker president. The Twenty-fifth Amendment to the Constitution put Tyler's precedent into law in 1967. It also established a mechanism by which an intra-term vacancy in the vice presidency could be filled. Richard Nixon was the first president to fill a vacancy under this provision when he selected Gerald Ford for the office following Spiro Agnew's resignation in 1973. The following year, Ford became the second to do so when he chose Nelson Rockefeller to succeed him after he acceded to the presidency. As no mechanism existed for filling an intra-term vacancy in the vice presidency prior to 1967, the office was left vacant until filled through the next ensuing presidential election.

Throughout most of its history, American politics has been dominated by political parties. The Constitution is silent on the issue of political parties, and at the time it came into force in 1789, there were no parties. Soon after the 1st Congress convened, factions began rallying around dominant Washington Administration officials, such as Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson. Greatly concerned about the capacity of political parties to destroy the fragile unity holding the nation together, Washington remained unaffiliated with any political faction or party throughout his eight-year presidency. He was, and remains, the only U.S. president never affiliated with a political party. Since Washington, every president has been affiliated with a political party at the time they assumed office.

List of Vice Presidents of the United States

There have been 48 Vice Presidents of the United States since the office came into existence in 1789. Originally, the Vice President was the person who received the second most votes for President in the Electoral College. However, in the election of 1800 a tie in the electoral college between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr led to the selection of the President by the House of Representatives. To prevent such an event from happening again, the Twelfth Amendment was added to the Constitution, creating the current system where electors cast a separate ballot for the vice presidency.The Vice President is the first person in the presidential line of succession and assumes that presidency if the President dies, resigns, or is impeached and removed from office. Nine Vice Presidents have ascended to the presidency in this way: eight (John Tyler, Millard Fillmore, Andrew Johnson, Chester A. Arthur, Theodore Roosevelt, Calvin Coolidge, Harry S. Truman and Lyndon B. Johnson) through the president's death and one (Gerald Ford) through the president's resignation. In addition, the Vice President serves as the President of the Senate and may choose to cast a tie-breaking vote on decisions made by the Senate. Vice Presidents have exercised this latter power to varying extents over the years.Prior to adoption of the Twenty-fifth Amendment in 1967, an intra-term vacancy in the office of the Vice President could not be filled until the next post-election inauguration. Several such vacancies occurred—seven Vice Presidents died, one resigned and eight succeeded to the presidency. This amendment allowed for a vacancy to be filled through appointment by the President and confirmation by both chambers of the Congress. Since its ratification, the vice presidency has been vacant twice (both in the context of scandals surrounding the Nixon administration) and was filled both times through this process, namely in 1973 following Spiro Agnew's resignation, and again in 1974 after Gerald Ford succeeded to the presidency. The amendment also established a procedure whereby a Vice President may, if the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of the office, temporarily assume the powers and duties of the office as Acting President. George H. W. Bush did so once on July 13, 1985. Dick Cheney did so twice on June 29, 2002 and on July 21, 2007.

The persons who have served as Vice President were born in or primarily affiliated with 27 states plus the District of Columbia. New York has produced the most of any state as eight have been born there and three others considered it their home state. Most Vice Presidents have been in their 50s or 60s and had political experience prior to assuming the office. The youngest person to become Vice President was John C. Breckinridge at 36 years of age while the oldest was Alben W. Barkley at 71 years of age. Two Vice Presidents—George Clinton and John C. Calhoun—served under more than one President.

There are currently five living former vice presidents. The most recent former vice president to die was George H. W. Bush on November 30, 2018.

List of executive actions by Donald Trump

Listed below are executive orders beginning with order number 13765, Presidential memoranda, Presidential determinations, Presidential proclamations, Administrative orders, Presidential notices, Presidential sequestration orders and National security presidential memoranda signed by United States President Donald Trump.

List of presidential trips made by Barack Obama (2013)

This is a list of presidential trips made by Barack Obama during 2013, the fifth year of his presidency as the 44th President of the United States.

This list excludes trips made within Washington, D.C., the U.S. federal capital in which the White House, the official residence and principal workplace of the President, is located. Additionally excluded are trips to Camp David, the country residence of the President, and to the private home of the Obama family in Kenwood, Chicago.

List of presidential trips made by Barack Obama (2014)

This is a list of presidential trips made by Barack Obama during 2014, the sixth year of his presidency as the 44th President of the United States.

This list excludes trips made within Washington, D.C., the U.S. federal capital in which the White House, the official residence and principal workplace of the President, is located. Additionally excluded are trips to Camp David, the country residence of the President, and to the private home of the Obama family in Kenwood, Chicago.

List of proclamations by Donald Trump

Listed below are the Presidential proclamations beginning with 9570 signed by United States President Donald Trump.

As of January 23, 2018, there have been 124 Presidential proclamations signed by President Trump.

Macon Phillips

Macon Phillips (born June 29, 1978) is a U.S. public servant who served as the Coordinator of the United States Department of State Bureau of International Information Programs from 2013 to 2017. He reported to Rick Stengel, the Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs. Phillips is the former White House Director of New Media, in which capacity he had oversight responsibility for WhiteHouse.gov. Phillips' work on WhiteHouse.gov closely coordinated with internet operations at the Democratic National Committee, which has responsibility for administration of the BarackObama.com domain and website. At precisely 12:00 p.m.ET during the inauguration of Barack Obama, Phillips oversaw the conversion of Whitehouse.gov, the official website of the President of the United States. At 12:01 p.m., he posted the site's first blog entry, titled: Change has come to WhiteHouse.gov.

New Energy for America

New Energy for America was a plan led by Barack Obama and Joe Biden to invest in renewable energy sources, reduce reliance on foreign oil, address global warming issues, and create jobs for Americans.

Political appointments by Donald Trump

This is a list of political appointments of current officeholders made by the 45th President of the United States, Donald Trump.

Links to lists of announced positions from which candidates have withdrawn or appointees who have resigned or have been terminated, as well as lists of appointments to other independent agencies and of holdovers from previous administrations are below.

As of 2016, there were around 4,000 political appointment positions which the incoming Trump administration needed to review, and fill or confirm, of which 1,212 required Senate confirmation. The Washington Post has identified 705 key positions requiring U.S. Senate confirmation. As of September 7, 2018, 364 of Trump's nominees for key positions had been confirmed, 181 were awaiting confirmation, and 7 had been announced but not yet formally nominated, a total of 552 positions. Trump has said he intends not to fill many of the positions. The rules of the Senate require that when the term of the Senate expires (in the case of the 115th Congress, at noon on January 3, 2019), nominations then pending lapse and are returned to the president, who can resubmit them to the new Congress.All members of the Cabinet require confirmation by the United States Senate following nomination by the President prior to taking office. The Vice-Presidency is exceptional in that the position requires election to office pursuant to the United States Constitution. Although some positions are of Cabinet-level rank, non-cabinet members within the Executive Office of the President, such as White House Chief of Staff, National Security Advisor, and White House Press Secretary, do not hold constitutionally created positions and most do not require Senate confirmation for appointment. Persons appointed on an acting basis do not require Senate confirmation before they begin to act in their position, even if a permanent appointment to that position would require confirmation. Appointments to judgeships on federal courts and of ambassadors require nomination by the president and confirmation by the Senate. Acting appointments to these positions are not permissible.

Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board

The Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB) is an independent agency within the executive branch of the United States government, established by Congress in 2004 to advise the President and other senior executive branch officials to ensure that concerns with respect to privacy and civil liberties in the United States are appropriately considered in the development and implementation of all laws, regulations, and executive branch policies related to terrorism.

Timeline of the Barack Obama presidency (2010)

The following is a timeline of the Presidency of Barack Obama, from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010. For his time as President-elect, see the Presidential transition of Barack Obama; for a detailed account of his first months in office, see First 100 days of Barack Obama's presidency; for a complete itinerary of his travels, see List of presidential trips made by Barack Obama.

Timeline of the Barack Obama presidency (2014)

The following is a timeline of the presidency of Barack Obama, from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014. For his time as President-elect, see the Presidential transition of Barack Obama; for a detailed account of his first months in office, see First 100 days of Barack Obama's presidency; and for a complete itinerary of his travels, see List of presidential trips made by Barack Obama.

Timeline of the Barack Obama presidency (2015)

The following is a timeline of the presidency of Barack Obama, from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015. For his time as President-elect, see the Presidential transition of Barack Obama; for a detailed account of his first months in office, see First 100 days of Barack Obama's presidency; and for a complete itinerary of his travels, see List of presidential trips made by Barack Obama.

United States Ambassadors appointed by Donald Trump

This is a list of United States ambassadors appointed by the 45th president of the United States, Donald Trump.

Ambassadorships are often used as a form of political patronage to reward high-profile or important supporters of the President. The most visible ambassadorships are often distributed either in this way or to the President's ideological or partisan confreres. Most ambassadorships, however, are assigned to Foreign Service Officers who have spent their career in the State Department. Regardless, all ambassadors must be formally appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate. While all ambassadors serve at the president's pleasure and may be dismissed at any time, career diplomats usually serve tours of roughly three years before receiving a new assignment, and political appointees customarily tender their resignations upon the inauguration of a new president.

The rules of the Senate require that when the term of a Senate expires (in the case of the 115th Congress, on January 2, 2019), nominations then pending lapse and are returned to the president, who can resubmit them to the new Congress.

We the People (petitioning system)

We the People, launched September 22, 2011, was a section of the whitehouse.gov website (under President Barack Obama) for petitioning the administration's policy experts. Petitions that met a certain threshold of signatures were typically reviewed by Administration officials who prepared and issued official responses, however, this was not always the case. Criminal justice proceedings in the United States and other processes of the federal government are not subject to White House website petitions. We the People, rather, served as a public relations device for the Obama administration to provide a venue for citizens to express themselves. On August 23, 2012, the White House Director of Digital Strategy Macon Phillips released the source code for the platform. The source code is available on GitHub, and lists both public domain status as a work of the U.S. federal government and licensing under the GPL v2. On December 19, 2017, the Trump administration announced its intention to shut down the website and replace it with a "new platform would save taxpayers more than $1m a year." As of January 2019, the site is operating as it was before it shut down.

White House Christmas tree

The White House Christmas Tree, also known as the Blue Room Christmas Tree, is the official indoor Christmas tree at the residence of the President of the United States, the White House. The first indoor Christmas tree was installed in the White House sometime in the 19th century (there are varying claims as to the exact year) and since 1961 the tree has had a themed motif at the discretion of the First Lady of the United States.

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