Western Conference (NBA)

The Western Conference of the National Basketball Association (NBA) is one of two conferences that makes up the association, the other being the Eastern Conference. Like the Eastern Conference, the Western Conference is made up of 15 teams, organized in three divisions.

The divisional alignment was adopted at the start of the 2004–05 season, when the now Charlotte Hornets began playing as the NBA's 30th franchise. This necessitated the move of the New Orleans Pelicans from the Eastern Conference's Central Division to the newly created Southwest Division of the Western Conference.

Western Conference
Western Conference (NBA) logo 2018
LeagueNational Basketball Association
SportBasketball
FormerlyWestern Division
(1946–1970)
Founded1970
Teams
No. of teams15
Championships
Most recent Western Conference champion(s)Golden State Warriors
(7th title)
Most Western Conference titlesLos Angeles Lakers
(31 titles)

Current standings

Western Conference
# Team W L PCT GB GP
1 cGolden State Warriors * 57 25 .695 82
2 yDenver Nuggets * 54 28 .659 3.0 82
3 xPortland Trail Blazers 53 29 .646 4.0 82
4 yHouston Rockets * 53 29 .646 4.0 82
5 xUtah Jazz 50 32 .610 7.0 82
6 xOklahoma City Thunder 49 33 .598 8.0 82
7 xSan Antonio Spurs 48 34 .585 9.0 82
8 xLos Angeles Clippers 48 34 .585 9.0 82
9 Sacramento Kings 39 43 .476 18.0 82
10 Los Angeles Lakers 37 45 .451 20.0 82
11 Minnesota Timberwolves 36 46 .439 21.0 82
12 Memphis Grizzlies 33 49 .402 24.0 82
13 New Orleans Pelicans 33 49 .402 24.0 82
14 Dallas Mavericks 33 49 .402 24.0 82
15 Phoenix Suns 19 63 .232 38.0 82

Notes

  • c – Clinched home court advantage for the conference playoffs
  • y – Clinched division title
  • x – Clinched playoff spot
  • * – Division londo

Teams

Team Division Location Year From
Joined
Dallas Mavericks Southwest Dallas, Texas 1980–present dagger
Denver Nuggets Northwest Denver, Colorado 1976–present ABAdouble-dagger
Golden State Warriors Pacific Oakland, California 1962–present Eastern Division
Houston Rockets Southwest Houston, Texas 1967–present dagger
Eastern Conference
Los Angeles Clippers Pacific Los Angeles, California 1978–present Eastern Conference
Los Angeles Lakers Pacific Los Angeles, California 1948–present dagger
Memphis Grizzlies Southwest Memphis, Tennessee 1995–present dagger
Minnesota Timberwolves Northwest Minneapolis, Minnesota 1989–present dagger
New Orleans Pelicans Southwest New Orleans, Louisiana[a] 2004–present Eastern Conference
Oklahoma City Thunder Northwest Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1967–present dagger
Phoenix Suns Pacific Phoenix, Arizona 1968–present dagger
Portland Trail Blazers Northwest Portland, Oregon 1970–present dagger
Sacramento Kings Pacific Sacramento, California 1948–present dagger
Eastern Conference
San Antonio Spurs Southwest San Antonio, Texas 1980–present Eastern Conference
Utah Jazz Northwest Salt Lake City, Utah 1979–present Eastern Conference

Former teams

Team Location Year From Year To Current conference
Joined Left
Anderson Packers Anderson, Indiana 1949 dagger 1950 Defunct Defunct
Tri-Cities Blackhawks (19491951)
Milwaukee Hawks (19511955)
St. Louis Hawks (19551968)
Atlanta Hawks (1968–present)
Moline, Illinois
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
St. Louis, Missouri
Atlanta, Georgia
1949 —* 1970 Eastern Conference Eastern Conference
Baltimore Bullets Baltimore, Maryland 1947 dagger 1948 Eastern Division Defunct
Charlotte Hornets Charlotte, North Carolina 1989 Eastern Conference 1990 Eastern Conference Eastern Conference
Chicago Bulls Chicago, Illinois 1966 dagger 1980 Eastern Conference Eastern Conference
Chicago Packers (1961–1962)
Chicago Zephyrs (1962–1963)
Baltimore Bullets (19621973)
Chicago, Illinois
Baltimore, Maryland
1961 dagger 1966 Eastern Division Eastern Conference
(as Washington Wizards)
Chicago Stags Chicago, Illinois 1946 1949 Central Division Defunct
Cleveland Rebels Cleveland, Ohio 1946 1947 Defunct Defunct
Denver Nuggets Denver, Colorado 1949 —* 1950 Defunct Defunct
Detroit Falcons Detroit, Michigan 1946 1947 Defunct Defunct
Fort Wayne Pistons (19481957)
Detroit Pistons (1957–present)
Fort Wayne, Indiana
Detroit, Michigan
1948
1950
1970
—*
Central Division
Eastern Division
1949
1967
1978
Central Division
Eastern Division
Eastern Conference
Eastern Conference
Indiana Pacers Indianapolis, Indiana 1976 ABAdouble-dagger 1979 Eastern Conference Eastern Conference
Indianapolis Jets Indianapolis, Indiana 1948 —* 1949 Defunct Defunct
Indianapolis Olympians Indianapolis, Indiana 1949 dagger 1953 Defunct Defunct
Miami Heat Miami, Florida 1988 dagger 1989 Eastern Conference Eastern Conference
Milwaukee Bucks Milwaukee, Wisconsin 1970 Eastern Conference 1980 Eastern Conference Eastern Conference
Orlando Magic Orlando, Florida 1990 Eastern Conference 1991 Eastern Conference Eastern Conference
Pittsburgh Ironmen Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1946 1947 Defunct Defunct
Sheboygan Red Skins Sheboygan, Wisconsin 1949 —* 1950 Defunct Defunct
St. Louis Bombers St. Louis, Missouri 1946 1949 Central Division Defunct
Washington Capitols Washington, D.C. 1947 dagger 1948 Eastern Division Defunct
Waterloo Hawks Waterloo, Iowa 1949 —* 1950 Defunct Defunct
Notes

Team timeline

Denotes team that currently in the conference
Denotes team that has left the conference

Conference champions

Western Conference was named Western Division until 1970
Bold Winning team of the BAA Finals or NBA Finals
^ Had or tied for the best regular season record for that season
Season Team Record Playoffs result
1946–47 Chicago Stags 39–22 (.639) Lost BAA Finals 1–4
1947–48 Baltimore Bullets 28–20 (.583) Won BAA Finals 4–2
1948–49 Minneapolis Lakers 44–16 (.733) Won BAA Finals 4–2
1949–50 Anderson Packers[b] 37–27 (.578) Lost NBA Semifinals 0–2
1950–51 Rochester Royals 41–27 (.603) Won NBA Finals 4–3
1951–52 Minneapolis Lakers 40–26 (.606) Won NBA Finals 4–3
1952–53 Minneapolis Lakers^ 48–22 (.686) Won NBA Finals 4–1
1953–54 Minneapolis Lakers^ 46–26 (.639) Won NBA Finals 4–3
1954–55 Fort Wayne Pistons^ 43–29 (.597) Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1955–56 Fort Wayne Pistons 37–35 (.514) Lost NBA Finals 1–4
1956–57 St. Louis Hawks 34–38 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1957–58 St. Louis Hawks 41–31 Won NBA Finals 4–2
1958–59 Minneapolis Lakers 49–23 Lost NBA Finals 0–4
1959–60 St. Louis Hawks 41–31 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1960–61 St. Louis Hawks 51–28 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
1961–62 Los Angeles Lakers 54–26 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1962–63 Los Angeles Lakers 53–27 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1963–64 San Francisco Warriors 48–32 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
1964–65 Los Angeles Lakers 49–31 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
1965–66 Los Angeles Lakers 45–35 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1966–67 San Francisco Warriors 44–37 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1967–68 Los Angeles Lakers 52–30 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1968–69 Los Angeles Lakers 55–27 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1969–70 Los Angeles Lakers 46–36 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1970–71 Milwaukee Bucks^ 66–16 Won NBA Finals 4–0
1971–72 Los Angeles Lakers^ 69–13 Won NBA Finals 4–1
1972–73 Los Angeles Lakers 60–22 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
1973–74 Milwaukee Bucks^ 59–23 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1974–75 Golden State Warriors 59–23 Won NBA Finals 4–0
1975–76 Phoenix Suns 52–30 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1976–77 Portland Trail Blazers 49–33 Won NBA Finals 4–2
1977–78 Seattle SuperSonics 46–36 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1978–79 Seattle SuperSonics 52–30 Won NBA Finals 4–1
1979–80 Los Angeles Lakers 60–22 Won NBA Finals 4–2
1980–81 Houston Rockets 40–42 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1981–82 Los Angeles Lakers 57–25 Won NBA Finals 4–2
1982–83 Los Angeles Lakers 58–24 Lost NBA Finals 0–4
1983–84 Los Angeles Lakers 54–28 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1984–85 Los Angeles Lakers 62–20 Won NBA Finals 4–2
1985–86 Houston Rockets 51–31 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1986–87 Los Angeles Lakers^ 65–17 Won NBA Finals 4–2
1987–88 Los Angeles Lakers^ 62–20 Won NBA Finals 4–3
1988–89 Los Angeles Lakers 57–25 Lost NBA Finals 0–4
1989–90 Portland Trail Blazers 59–23 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
1990–91 Los Angeles Lakers 58–24 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
1991–92 Portland Trail Blazers 57–25 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1992–93 Phoenix Suns^ 62–20 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1993–94 Houston Rockets 58–24 Won NBA Finals 4–3
1994–95 Houston Rockets 47–35 Won NBA Finals 4–0
1995–96 Seattle SuperSonics 64–18 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1996–97 Utah Jazz 64–18 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1997–98 Utah Jazz^ 62–20 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1998–99 San Antonio Spurs^ 37–13 Won NBA Finals 4–1
1999–00 Los Angeles Lakers^ 67–15 Won NBA Finals 4–2
2000–01 Los Angeles Lakers 56–26 Won NBA Finals 4–1
2001–02 Los Angeles Lakers 58–24 Won NBA Finals 4–0
2002–03 San Antonio Spurs^ 60–22 Won NBA Finals 4–2
2003–04 Los Angeles Lakers 56–26 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
2004–05 San Antonio Spurs 59–23 Won NBA Finals 4–3
2005–06 Dallas Mavericks 60–22 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
2006–07 San Antonio Spurs 58–24 Won NBA Finals 4–0
2007–08 Los Angeles Lakers 57–25 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
2008–09 Los Angeles Lakers 65–17 Won NBA Finals 4–1
2009–10 Los Angeles Lakers 57–25 Won NBA Finals, 4–3
2010–11 Dallas Mavericks 57–25 Won NBA Finals, 4–2
2011–12 Oklahoma City Thunder 47–19 Lost NBA Finals, 1–4
2012–13 San Antonio Spurs 58–24 Lost NBA Finals, 3–4
2013–14 San Antonio Spurs^ 62–20 Won NBA Finals, 4–1
2014–15 Golden State Warriors^ 67–15 Won NBA Finals, 4–2[1]
2015–16 Golden State Warriors^ 73–9 Lost NBA Finals, 3–4
2016–17 Golden State Warriors^ 67–15 Won NBA Finals, 4–1
2017–18 Golden State Warriors 58–24 Won NBA Finals, 4–0
2018–19 Golden State Warriors 57–25

List of Western Conference teams with the most conference championships

Season results

^ Denotes team that won the NBA championships
+ Denotes team that won the Conference Finals, but lost the NBA Finals
* Denotes team that qualified for the NBA Playoffs
Season Team (record)
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th
  • 1946: The Western Division was formed with five inaugural members.
1946–47 CHI+
(39–22)
STL*
(38–23)
CLE*
(30–30)
DET
(20–40)
PIT
(15–45)
1947–48 STL*
(29–19)
BAL^
(28–20)
CHI*
(28–20)
WAS*
(28–20)
1948–49 RCH*
(45–15)
MIN^
(44–16)
CHI*
(38–22)
STL*
(29–31)
FWP
(22–38)
IND
(18–42)
1949–50 IND*
(39–25)
AND*
(37–27)
TCH*
(29–35)
SRK*
(22–40)
WAT
(19–43)
DEN
(11–51)
1950–51 MIN*
(44–24)
RCH^
(41–27)
FWP*
(32–36)
IND*
(31–37)
TCB
(25–43)
1951–52 RCH*
(41–25)
MIN^
(40–26)
IND*
(34–32)
FWP*
(29–37)
MIL
(17–49)
1952–53 MIN^
(48–22)
RCH*
(44–26)
FWP*
(36–33)
IND*
(28–43)
MIL
(27–44)
1953–54 MIN^
(46–26)
RCH*
(44–28)
FWP*
(40–32)
MIL
(21–51)
1954–55 FWP+
(43–29)
MIN*
(40–32)
RCH*
(29–43)
MIL
(26–46)
1955–56 FWP+
(37–35)
MIN*
(33–39)
MIL*
(33–39)
RCH
(31–41)
1956–57 STL+
(34–38)
MIN*
(34–38)
FWP*
(34–38)
RCH
(31–41)
1957–58 STL^
(41–31)
DET*
(33–39)
CIN*
(33–39)
MIN
(19–53)
1958–59 St. Louis^
(49–23)
Minneapolis+
(33–39)
Detroit*
(28–44)
Cincinnati
(19–53)
1959–60 St. Louis+
(41–31)
Detroit*
(30–45)
Minneapolis*
(25–50)
Cincinnati
(19–56)
1960–61 St. Louis+
(51–28)
Los Angeles*
(36–43)
Detroit*
(34–45)
Cincinnati
(33–46)
1961–62 Los Angeles+
(54–26)
Cincinnati*
(43–37)
Detroit*
(37–43)
St. Louis
(29–51)
Chicago
(18–62)
1962–63 Los Angeles+
(53–27)
St. Louis*
(48–32)
Detroit*
(34–46)
San Francisco
(31–49)
Chicago
(25–55)
1963–64 San Francisco+
(48–32)
St. Louis*
(46–34)
Los Angeles*
(42–38)
Baltimore
(31–49)
Detroit
(23–57)
1964–65 Los Angeles+
(49–31)
St. Louis*
(45–35)
Baltimore*
(37–43)
Detroit
(31–49)
San Francisco
(17–63)
1965–66 Los Angeles+
(45–35)
St. Louis*
(38–42)
Baltimore*
(36–44)
San Francisco
(35–45)
Detroit
(22–58)
1966–67 San Francisco+
(44–37)
St. Louis*
(39–42)
Los Angeles*
(36–45)
Chicago*
(33–48)
Detroit
(30–51)
1967–68 St. Louis*
(56–26)
Los Angeles+
(52–30)
San Francisco*
(43–39)
Chicago*
(29–53)
Seattle
(23–59)
San Diego
(15–67)
1968–69 Los Angeles+
(55–27)
Atlanta*
(48–34)
San Francisco*
(41–41)
San Diego*
(37–45)
Chicago
(33–49)
Seattle
(30–52)
Phoenix
(16–66)
1969–70 Atlanta*
(48–34)
Los Angeles+
(46–36)
Phoenix*
(39–43)
Chicago*
(39–43)
Seattle
(36–46)
San Francisco
(30–52)
San Diego
(27–55)
The Western Division became the Western Conference.
1970–71 Milwaukee^
(66–16)
Los Angeles*
(48–34)
Chicago*
(51–31)
San Francisco*
(41–41)
Phoenix
(48–34)
Detroit
(45–37)
San Diego
(40–42)
Seattle
(38–44)
Portland
(29–53)
1971–72 Los Angeles^
(69–13)
Milwaukee*
(63–19)
Chicago*
(57–25)
Golden State*
(51–31)
Phoenix
(49–33)
Seattle
(47–35)
Houston
(34–48)
Detroit
(26–56)
Portland
(18–64)
1972–73 Milwaukee*
(60–22)
Los Angeles+
(60–22)
Chicago*
(51–31)
Golden State*
(47–35)
Detroit
(40–42)
Phoenix
(38–44)
Kansas City
-Omaha
(36–46)
Seattle
(26–56)
Portland
(21–61)
1973–74 Milwaukee+
(59–23)
Los Angeles*
(47–35)
Chicago*
(54–28)
Detroit*
(52–30)
Golden State
(44–38)
Seattle
(36–46)
Kansas City
-Omaha
(33–49)
Phoenix
(30–52)
Portland
(27–55)
1974–75 Golden State^
(48–34)
Chicago*
(47–35)
Kansas City
-Omaha
* (44–38)
Seattle*
(43–39)
Detroit*
(40–42)
Portland
(38–44)
Milwaukee
(38–44)
Phoenix
(32–50)
Los Angeles
(30–52)
1975–76 Golden State*
(59–23)
Milwaukee*
(47–35)
Seattle*
(54–28)
Phoenix+
(52–30)
Detroit*
(44–38)
Los Angeles
(36–46)
Portland
(33–49)
Kansas City
(30–52)
Chicago
(27–55)
1976–77 Los Angeles*
(53–29)
Denver*
(50–32)
Portland^
(49–33)
Golden State*
(46–36)
Detroit*
(44–38)
Chicago*
(44–38)
Seattle
(40–42)
Kansas City
(40–42)
Indiana
(36–46)
Phoenix
(34–48)
Milwaukee
(30–52)
1977–78 Portland*
(58-24)
Denver*
(50–32)
Phoenix*
(49–33)
Seattle+
(46–36)
Los Angeles*
(44–38)
Milwaukee*
(44–38)
Golden State
(40–42)
Chicago
(40–42)
Detroit
(36–46)
Kansas City
(34–48)
Indiana
(30–52)
1978–79 Seattle^
(52–30)
Kansas City*
(48–34)
Phoenix*
(50–32)
Denver*
(47–35)
Los Angeles*
(47–35)
Portland*
(45–37)
San Diego
(43–39)
Milwaukee
(38–44)
Golden State
(38–44)
Indiana
(38–44)
Chicago
(31–51)
1979–80 Los Angeles^
(60–22)
Milwaukee*
(48–34)
Seattle*
(50–32)
Phoenix*
(47–35)
Kansas City*
(47–35)
Portland*
(45–37)
San Diego
(43–39)
Denver
(38–44)
Golden State
(38–44)
Chicago
(38–44)
Utah
(31–51)
1980–81 Phoenix*
(57–25)
San Antonio*
(52–30)
Los Angeles*
(54–28)
Portland*
(45–37)
Kansas City*
(40–42)
Houston+
(40–42)
Golden State
(39–43)
Denver
(37–45)
San Diego
(36–46)
Seattle
(34–48)
Utah
(28–54)
Dallas
(15–67)
1981–82 Los Angeles^
(57–25)
San Antonio*
(48–34)
Seattle*
(52–30)
Denver*
(46–36)
Phoenix*
(46–36)
Houston*
(46–36)
Golden State
(45–37)
Portland
(42–40)
Kansas City
(30–52)
Dallas
(28–54)
Utah
(25–57)
San Diego
(17–65)
1982–83 Los Angeles+
(58–24)
San Antonio*
(53–29)
Phoenix*
(53–29)
Seattle*
(48–34)
Portland*
(46–36)
Denver*
(46–37)
Kansas City
(46–37)
Dallas
(38–44)
Golden State
(30–52)
Utah
(30–52)
San Diego
(25–57)
Houston
(14–68)
1983–84 Los Angeles+
(54–28)
Utah*
(45–37)
Portland*
(48–34)
Dallas*
(43–39)
Seattle*
(42–40)
Phoenix*
(41–41)
Denver*
(38–44)
Kansas City*
(38–44)
Golden State
(37–45)
San Antonio
(37–45)
San Diego
(30–52)
Houston
(29–53)
1984–85 L.A. Lakers^
(62–20)
Denver*
(52–30)
Houston*
(48–34)
Dallas*
(44–38)
Portland*
(42–40)
Utah*
(41–41)
San Antonio*
(41–41)
Phoenix*
(36–46)
Kansas City
(31–51)
Seattle
(31–51)
L.A. Clippers
(31–51)
Golden State
(22–60)
1985–86 L.A. Lakers*
(62–20)
Houston+
(51–31)
Denver*
(47–35)
Dallas*
(44–38)
Utah*
(42–40)
Portland*
(40–42)
Sacramento*
(37–45)
San Antonio*
(35–47)
Phoenix
(32–50)
L.A. Clippers
(32–50)
Seattle
(31–51)
Golden State
(30–52)
1986–87 L.A. Lakers^
(65–17)
Dallas*
(55–27)
Portland*
(49–33)
Utah*
(44–38)
Golden State*
(42–40)
Houston*
(42–40)
Seattle*
(39–43)
Denver*
(37–45)
Phoenix
(36–46)
Sacramento
(29–53)
San Antonio
(28–54)
L.A. Clippers
(12–70)
1987–88 L.A. Lakers^
(62–20)
Denver*
(54–28)
Dallas*
(53–29)
Portland*
(53–29)
Utah*
(47–35)
Houston*
(46–36)
Seattle*
(44–38)
San Antonio*
(31–51)
Phoenix
(28–54)
Sacramento
(24–58)
Golden State
(20–62)
L.A. Clippers
(17–65)
1988–89 L.A. Lakers+
(57–25)
Utah*
(51–31)
Phoenix*
(55–27)
Seattle*
(47–35)
Houston*
(45–37)
Denver*
(44–38)
Golden State*
(43–39)
Portland*
(39–43)
Dallas
(38–44)
Sacramento
(27–55)
L.A. Clippers
(21–61)
San Antonio
(21–61)
Miami
(15–67)
1989–90 L.A. Lakers*
(63–19)
San Antonio*
(56–26)
Portland+
(59–23)
Utah*
(55–27)
Phoenix*
(54–28)
Dallas*
(47–35)
Denver*
(43–39)
Houston*
(41–41)
Seattle
(41–41)
Golden State
(37–45)
L.A. Clippers
(30–52)
Sacramento
(23–59)
Minnesota
(22–60)
Charlotte
(19–63)
1990–91 Portland*
(63–19)
San Antonio*
(55–27)
L.A. Lakers+
(58–24)
Phoenix*
(55–27)
Utah*
(54–28)
Houston*
(52–30)
Golden State*
(44–38)
Seattle*
(41–41)
Orlando
(31–51)
L.A. Clippers
(32–51)
Minnesota
(29–53)
Dallas
(28–54)
Sacramento
(25–57)
Denver
(20–62)
1991–92 Portland+
(57–25)
Utah*
(55–27)
Golden State*
(55–27)
Phoenix*
(53–29)
San Antonio*
(47–35)
Seattle*
(47–35)
L.A. Clippers*
(45–37)
L.A. Lakers*
(43–39)
Houston
(42–40)
Sacramento
(29–53)
Denver
(24–58)
Dallas
(22–60)
Minnesota
(15–67)
1992–93 Phoenix+
(62–20)
Houston*
(55–27)
Seattle*
(55–27)
Portland*
(51–31)
San Antonio*
(49–33)
Utah*
(47–35)
L.A. Clippers*
(41–41)
L.A. Lakers*
(39–43)
Denver
(36–46)
Golden State
(34–48)
Sacramento
(25–57)
Minnesota
(19–63)
Dallas
(11–71)
1993–94 Seattle*
(63–19)
Houston^
(58–24)
Phoenix*
(56–26)
San Antonio*
(55–27)
Utah*
(53–39)
Golden State*
(50–32)
Portland*
(47–35)
Denver*
(42–40)
L.A. Lakers
(33–49)
Sacramento
(28–54)
L.A. Clippers
(27–55)
Minnesota
(20–62)
Dallas
(13–69)
1994–95 San Antonio*
(62–20)
Phoenix*
(59–23)
Utah*
(60–22)
Seattle*
(57–25)
L.A. Lakers*
(48–34)
Houston^
(47–35)
Portland*
(44–38)
Denver*
(41–41)
Sacramento
(39–43)
Dallas
(36–46)
Golden State
(26–56)
Minnesota
(21–61)
L.A. Clippers
(17–65)
1995–96 Seattle+
(64–18)
San Antonio*
(59–23)
Utah*
(55–27)
L.A. Lakers*
(53–29)
Houston*
(48–34)
Portland*
(44–38)
Phoenix*
(41–41)
Sacramento*
(39–43)
Golden State
(36–46)
Denver
(35–47)
L.A. Clippers
(29–53)
Minnesota
(26–56)
Dallas
(26–56)
Vancouver
(15–67)
1996–97 Utah+
(64–18)
Seattle*
(57–25)
Houston*
(57–25)
L.A. Lakers*
(56–26)
Portland*
(49–33)
Minnesota*
(40–42)
Phoenix*
(40–42)
L.A. Clippers*
(36–46)
Sacramento
(34–48)
Golden State
(30–52)
Dallas
(24–58)
Denver
(21–61)
San Antonio
(20–62)
Vancouver
(14–68)
1997–98 Utah+
(62–20)
Seattle*
(61–21)
L.A. Lakers*
(61–21)
Phoenix*
(56–26)
San Antonio*
(56–26)
Portland*
(46–36)
Minnesota*
(45–37)
Houston*
(41–41)
Sacramento
(27–55)
Dallas
(20–62)
Vancouver
(19–63)
Golden State
(19–63)
L.A. Clippers
(17–65)
Denver
(11–71)
1998–99 San Antonio^
(37–13)
Utah*
(37–13)
Portland*
(35–15)
L.A. Lakers*
(31–19)
Houston*
(31–19)
Phoenix*
(27–23)
Sacramento*
(27–23)
Minnesota*
(25–25)
Seattle
(25–25)
Golden State
(21–29)
Dallas
(19–31)
Denver
(14–36)
L.A. Clippers
(9–41)
Vancouver
(8–42)
1999–00 L.A. Lakers^
(67–15)
Utah*
(55–27)
Portland*
(59–23)
San Antonio*
(53–29)
Phoenix*
(53–29)
Minnesota*
(50–32)
Seattle*
(45–37)
Sacramento*
(44–38)
Dallas
(40–42)
Denver
(35–47)
Houston
(34–48)
Vancouver
(22–60)
Golden State
(19–63)
L.A. Clippers
(15–67)
2000–01 San Antonio*
(58–24)
L.A. Lakers^
(56–26)
Sacramento*
(55–27)
Utah*
(53–29)
Dallas*
(53–29)
Phoenix*
(53–29)
Portland*
(50–32)
Minnesota*
(47–35)
Houston
(45–37)
Seattle
(44–38)
Denver
(40–42)
L.A. Clippers
(31–51)
Vancouver
(23–59)
Golden State
(17–65)
2001–02 Sacramento*
(61–21)
San Antonio*
(58–24)
L.A. Lakers^
(56–26)
Dallas*
(53–29)
Minnesota*
(53–29)
Portland*
(53–29)
Seattle*
(50–32)
Utah*
(47–35)
L.A. Clippers
(45–37)
Phoenix
(44–38)
Houston
(40–42)
Denver
(31–51)
Memphis
(23–59)
Golden State
(17–65)
2002–03 San Antonio^
(60–22)
Sacramento*
(59–23)
Dallas*
(60–22)
Minnesota*
(51–31)
L.A. Lakers*
(50–32)
Portland*
(50–32)
Utah*
(47–35)
Phoenix*
(44–38)
Houston
(43–39)
Seattle
(40–42)
Golden State
(38–44)
Memphis
(28–54)
L.A. Clippers
(27–55)
Denver
(17–65)
2003–04 Minnesota*
(58–24)
L.A. Lakers+
(56–26)
San Antonio*
(57–25)
Sacramento*
(55–27)
Dallas*
(52–30)
Memphis*
(50–32)
Houston*
(45–37)
Denver*
(43–39)
Utah
(42–40)
Portland
(41–41)
Golden State
(37–45)
Seattle
(37–45)
Phoenix
(29–53)
L.A. Clippers
(28–54)
2004–05 Phoenix*
(62–20)
San Antonio^
(59–23)
Seattle*
(52–30)
Dallas*
(58–24)
Houston*
(51–31)
Sacramento*
(50–32)
Denver*
(49–33)
Memphis*
(45–37)
Minnesota
(44–38)
L.A. Clippers
(37–45)
L.A. Lakers
(34–48)
Golden State
(34–48)
Portland
(27–55)
Utah
(26–56)
New Orleans
(18–64)
2005–06 San Antonio*
(63–19)
Phoenix*
(54–28)
Denver*
(44–38)
Dallas+
(60–22)
Memphis*
(49–33)
L.A. Clippers*
(47–35)
L.A. Lakers*
(45–37)
Sacramento*
(44–38)
Utah
(41–41)
New Orleans/
Oklahoma City
[a]
(38–44)
Seattle
(35–47)
Houston
(34–48)
Golden State
(34–48)
Minnesota
(33–49)
Portland
(21–61)
2006–07 Dallas*
(67–15)
Phoenix*
(61–21)
San Antonio^
(58–24)
Utah*
(58–24)
Houston*
(52–30)
Denver*
(45–37)
L.A. Lakers*
(42–40)
Golden State*
(42–40)
L.A. Clippers
(40–42)
New Orleans/
Oklahoma City
[a]
(39–43)
Sacramento
(33–49)
Portland
(32–50)
Minnesota
(32–50)
Seattle
(31–51)
Memphis
(22–60)
2007–08 LAL+
(57–25)
NOH*
(56–26)
SAS*
(56–26)
UTA*
(54–28)
HOU*
(55–27)
PHX*
(55–27)
DAL*
(51–31)
DEN*
(50–32)
GSW
(48–34)
POR
(41–41)
SAC
(38–44)
LAC
(23–59)
MEM
(22–60)
MIN
(22–60)
SEA
(20–62)
2008–09 LAL^
(65–17)
DEN*
(54–28)
SAS*
(54–28)
POR*
(54–28)
HOU*
(53–29)
DAL*
(50–32)
NOH*
(49–33)
UTA*
(48–34)
PHX
(46–36)
GSW
(29–53)
MIN
(24–58)
MEM
(24–58)
OKC
(23–59)
LAC
(19–63)
SAC
(17–65)
2009–10 LAL^
(57–25)
DAL*
(55–27)
PHX*
(54–28)
DEN*
(53–29)
UTA*
(53–29)
POR*
(50–32)
SAS*
(50–32)
OKC*
(50–32)
HOU
(42–40)
MEM
(40–42)
NOH
(37–45)
LAC
(29–53)
GSW
(26–56)
SAC
(25–57)
MIN
(15–67)
2010–11 SAS*
(61–21)
LAL*
(57–25)
DAL^
(57–25)
OKC*
(55–27)
DEN*
(50–32)
POR*
(48–34)
NOH*
(46–36)
MEM*
(46–36)
HOU
(43–39)
PHX
(40–42)
UTA
(39–43)
GSW
(36–46)
LAC
(32–50)
SAC
(24–58)
MIN
(17–65)
2011–12 SAS*
(50–16)
OKC+
(47–19)
LAL*
(41–25)
MEM*
(41–25)
LAC*
(40–26)
DEN*
(38–28)
DAL*
(36–30)
UTA*
(36–30)
HOU
(34–32)
PHX
(33–33)
POR
(28–38)
MIN
(26–40)
GSW
(23–43)
SAC
(22–44)
NOH
(21–45)
2012–13 OKC*
(60–22)
SAS+
(58–24)
DEN*
(57–25)
LAC*
(56–26)
MEM*
(56–26)
GSW*
(47–35)
LAL*
(45–37)
HOU*
(45–37)
UTA
(43–39)
DAL
(41–41)
POR
(33–49)
MIN
(31–51)
SAC
(28–54)
NOH
(27–55)
PHX
(25–57)
2013–14 SAS^
(62–20)
OKC*
(59–23)
LAC*
(57–25)
HOU*
(54–28)
POR*
(54–28)
GSW*
(51–31)
MEM*
(50–32)
DAL*
(49–33)
PHX
(48–34)
MIN
(40–42)
DEN
(36–46)
NOP
(34–48)
SAC
(28–54)
LAL
(27–55)
UTA
(25–57)
2014–15 GSW^
(67–15)
HOU*
(56–26)
LAC*
(56–26)
POR*
(51–31)
MEM*
(55–27)
SAS*
(55–27)
DAL*
(50–32)
NOP*
(45–37)
OKC
(45–37)
PHX
(39–43)
UTA
(38–44)
DEN
(30–52)
SAC
(29–53)
LAL
(21–61)
MIN
(16–66)
2015–16 GSW+
(73–9)
SAS*
(67–15)
OKC*
(55–27)
LAC*
(53–29)
POR*
(44–38)
DAL*
(42–40)
MEM*
(42–40)
HOU*
(41–41)
UTA
(40–42)
SAC
(33–49)
DEN
(33–49)
NOP
(30–52)
MIN
(29–53)
PHX
(23–59)
LAL
(17–65)
2016–17 GSW^
(67–15)
SAS*
(61–21)
HOU*
(55–27)
LAC*
(51–31)
UTA*
(51–31)
OKC*
(47–35)
MEM*
(43–39)
POR*
(41–41)
DEN
(40–42)
NOP
(34–48)
DAL
(33–49)
SAC
(32–50)
MIN
(31–51)
LAL
(26–56)
PHX
(24–58)
2017–18 HOU*
(65–17)
GSW^
(58–24)
POR*
(49–33)
OKC*
(48–34)
UTA*
(48–34)
NOP*
(48–34)
SAS*
(47–35)
MIN*
(47–35)
DEN
(46–36)
LAC
(42–40)
LAL
(35–47)
SAC
(27–55)
DAL
(24–58)
MEM
(22–60)
PHX
(21–61)
2018–19 GSW*
(57–25)
DEN*
(54–28)
POR*
(53–29)
HOU*
(53–29)
UTA*
(50–32)
OKC*
(49–33)
SAS*
(48–34)
LAC*
(48–34)
SAC
(39–43)
LAL
(37–45)
MIN
(36–46)
MEM
(33–49)
NOP
(33–49)
DAL
(33–49)
PHX
(19–63)

Notes

  • a 1 2 3 The New Orleans Hornets temporarily relocated to Oklahoma City due to the effect of Hurricane Katrina. The majority of home games were played in Oklahoma City, while a few remained in New Orleans.
  • b 1 For the 1949–50 season only, the NBA had three different conferences (called divisions at the time), resulting in three different conference champions. The Anderson Packers of the Western Division had to play the Minneapolis Lakers of the Central Division in a best-of-three series in the NBA semifinals, with the Lakers winning 2–0 and advancing to the 1950 NBA Finals to take on the Eastern Division champion Syracuse Nationals.

References

  1. ^ NBA Season Recap |NBA.com
1947–48 Baltimore Bullets season

The 1947–48 BAA season was the Bullets' first season in the Basketball Association of America (later named the NBA), after playing their first three seasons in the American Basketball League.

1948–49 Minneapolis Lakers season

The 1948–49 BAA season was the Lakers' first season in the BAA (which later became the NBA after the conclusion of this season).This season saw the Lakers winning their first BAA championship, defeating the Washington Capitols in six games in the BAA Finals.

1950–51 Rochester Royals season

The 1950-51 Rochester Royals season was the third season for the team in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Royals finished the season by winning their first NBA Championship. The Royals scored 84.6 points per game and allowed 81.7 points per game. Rochester was led up front by Arnie Risen, a 6–9, 200-pound center nicknamed "Stilts", along with 6–5 Arnie Johnson and 6–7 Jack Coleman. The backcourt was manned by Bob Davies and Bobby Wanzer. Among the key reserves was a guard from City College of New York named William "Red" Holzman.

1951–52 Minneapolis Lakers season

The 1951–52 Minneapolis Lakers season was the fourth season for the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The NBA widened the foul lane before the 1951–52 season in an attempt to slow down George Mikan. Despite the change, it had little effect on Mikan. He still averaged 23.8 points per game, although he lost the scoring title to Paul Arizin, from the Philadelphia Warriors.

The Lakers went into the campaign with essentially the same lineup. Rochester took first place in the Western Division by a game, but the Lakers ousted the Royals in four games in the division finals. The NBA Finals would have the Lakers oppose the New York Knickerbockers.

Games 3 and 4 of the Finals were played at the 69th Regiment Armory instead of at Madison Square Garden. This was because the circus was in town. The teams split those games, and Games 5 and 6 as well. Game 7 was dominated by Minneapolis. The Lakers pounded out an 82–65 win, at home, to claim their third NBA crown in their first four seasons.

1952–53 Minneapolis Lakers season

The 1952-53 Minneapolis Lakers season was the fifth season for the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Lakers continued to be the dominant force in the league as they won the Western Division with a 48–22 record. In the playoffs, the Lakers would sweep the Indianapolis Olympians in 2 straight. In the Western Finals, the Lakers would win the first 2 games at home. Against the Fort Wayne Pistons, the Lakers were pushed to a 5th game. The series returned to Minneapolis, where the Lakers won the 5th game 74–58. In the Finals, the Lakers vanquished the New York Knickerbockers for their 2nd straight Championship, and 4th Championship overall in the franchise's first five seasons in the NBA.

1953–54 Minneapolis Lakers season

The 1953–54 Minneapolis Lakers season was the sixth season for the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Lakers won the Western Division with a 46–26 record. George Mikan was hampered by knee troubles as he averaged only 18.1 points per game. The Lakers signed a promising rookie named Clyde Lovellette, who was able to alleviate the pressure on Mikan.

In the first round, the Lakers won 3 straight to face the Rochester Royals in the Western Finals. The Lakers would beat the Royals to qualify for the NBA Finals. In the finals, the Lakers and Syracuse Nationals alternated wins. In the end, the Lakers emerged with their 3rd straight title, and 5th overall in the franchise's first six seasons in the NBA. They became the first NBA team to win three consecutive NBA championships. In the seventh and final game, the Lakers won by a score of 87–80, for the franchise's final NBA title before their relocation to Los Angeles in 1960. Following the season, Mikan would announce his retirement.The Lakers would not win another NBA championship until 1972.

1954–55 Fort Wayne Pistons season

The 1954-55 Fort Wayne Pistons season was the seventh season for the Pistons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and 14th season as a franchise. In the Western Division Finals the Pistons eliminated the Minneapolis Lakers 3-1 in a best-of-five series to reach the NBA Finals. They would go on to lose the Finals in seven games to the Syracuse Nationals.

1955–56 Fort Wayne Pistons season

The 1955–56 Fort Wayne Pistons season was the eighth season for the Pistons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and 15th season as a franchise. In the Western Division Finals the Pistons defeated the St. Louis Hawks in a best-of-five series 3-2 to reach the NBA Finals. They would go on to lose the Finals in five games to the Philadelphia Warriors.

1957–58 St. Louis Hawks season

The 1957–58 St. Louis Hawks season was the third for the franchise in St. Louis and the 12th season overall in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Coming off their trip to the 1957 NBA Finals, the Hawks won the Western Division by 8 games with a record of 41 wins and 31 losses. Bob Pettit ranked 3rd in scoring and 2nd in rebounding. In the Western Finals, the Hawks would beat the Detroit Pistons in 5 games. The Hawks would then face the Boston Celtics in the NBA Finals. After Games 1 and 2, the teams headed to St. Louis with the series tied at a game apiece. The Hawks took Game 3, as the Celtics lost Bill Russell to an ankle injury. Despite playing without Russell, the Celtics were triumphant in Game 4. The Hawks pulled out a 2-point victory in the Game 5 to take control of the series. Needing one more win for their first NBA Championship, the Hawks beat the Celtics 110–109 in Game 6. Bob Pettit scored 50 points playing against an injured Bill Russell as the Hawks and owner Ben Kerner won their first NBA Title.

1958–59 Minneapolis Lakers season

The 1958-59 Minneapolis Lakers season was the 11th season for the franchise in the NBA.The Lakers would make it to the NBA Finals, only to be swept by the Boston Celtics in four games.

1959–60 St. Louis Hawks season

The 1959–60 St. Louis Hawks season was the 14th season for the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Hawks claimed their 4th straight division title. They won the division by 16 games with a 46–29 record. Bob Pettit, Cliff Hagan, and Clyde Lovellette all averaged more than 20 points per game. In the Western Finals, the Hawks faced the Minneapolis Lakers and needed a win in Game 6 to stay alive. Game 6 was played in Minneapolis and the Hawks dominated the Lakers, as they won the match by 21 points to force a 7th game. In St. Louis the Hawks won 97–86 to earn a trip to the NBA Finals. The Hawks challenged the Boston Celtics for the 3rd time in 4 years. The Hawks and Celtics alternated wins as the series went to a 7th game. In Game 7 the Celtics would claim the title as Bill Russell scored 18 points in the 2nd Quarter.

1960–61 St. Louis Hawks season

Prior to the 1960-61 St. Louis Hawks season owner Ben Kerner changed coaches despite reaching the 1960 NBA Finals. Ed Macauley was replaced with Paul Seymour. On the court, rookie Lenny Wilkens was averaging 11.7 points per game in his first year. The brunt of the scoring came from the Hawks' front line of Bob Pettit, Cliff Hagan, and Clyde Lovellette. They combined for 72.0 points per game, and the Hawks won the West by 15 games. The Hawks finished the season with a record of 51–28. In the playoffs, the Hawks needed a 1-point overtime win in Game 6 on the road to force a 7th game with the Los Angeles Lakers. Game 7 was played in St. Louis and the Hawks beat the Lakers by 2 points. The Hawks then were up against the Boston Celtics in the NBA Finals. The Hawks fell in 5 games as the Celtics won their 4th NBA Title in 5 seasons.

1961–62 Los Angeles Lakers season

The 1961-62 NBA season was the Lakers' 14th season in the NBA and second season in Los Angeles.

1962–63 Los Angeles Lakers season

The 1962-63 NBA season was the Lakers' 15th season in the NBA and third season in Los Angeles.

1963–64 San Francisco Warriors season

The 1963–64 NBA season was the Warriors' 18th season in the NBA and second in San Francisco.The Warriors were led by superstar center Wilt Chamberlain, aided by rookie draft pick Nate Thurmond as well as veterans Tom Meschery and Al Attles, and were coached by newcomer Alex Hannum. The Warriors won 48 games and advanced to the NBA Finals in its second season as a San Francisco team. They were ousted in five by the Boston Celtics in the NBA Championship.

1964–65 Los Angeles Lakers season

The 1964–65 NBA season was the Lakers' 17th season in the NBA and fifth season in Los Angeles.The team reached the NBA Finals, only to fall against the Boston Celtics in five games.

1967–68 Los Angeles Lakers season

The 1967-68 NBA season was the Lakers' 20th season in the NBA and eighth season in Los Angeles. This was the first season the Lakers uniforms featured what would become the signature gold and purple colors.

List of NBA champions

The National Basketball Association (NBA) Finals is the championship series for the NBA and the conclusion of its postseason. All Finals have been played in a best-of-seven format, and are contested between the winners of the Eastern Conference and the Western Conference (formerly Divisions before 1970), except in 1950 when the Eastern Division champion faced the winner between the Western and Central Division champions. From 1946 through 1949, when the league was known as the Basketball Association of America (BAA), the playoffs were a three-stage tournament where the two semifinal winners played each other in the finals. The winning team of the series receives the Larry O'Brien Championship Trophy.

The current home-and-away format in the NBA Finals is in a 2–2–1–1–1 format (the team with the better regular season record plays on their home court in Games 1, 2, 5 and 7), which has been used in 1947–1948, 1950–1952, 1957–1970, 1972–1974, 1976–1977, 1979–1984 and 2014–present. It was previously in a 2–3–2 format (the team with the better regular season record plays on their home court in Games 1, 2, 6 and 7) during 1949, 1953–1955 and 1985–2013, in a 1–1–1–1–1–1–1 format during 1956 and 1971 and in a 1–2–2–1–1 format during 1975 and 1978.The Eastern Conference/Division leads the Western Conference/Division in series won (38–33). The defunct Central Division, in existence during the 1949–50 NBA season when the NBA was divided into three divisions and different from the current Central Division created in 1970 when the then existing Eastern Division was upgraded as a conference, won one championship. The Boston Celtics and the Minneapolis/Los Angeles Lakers alone own almost half of the titles, having won a combined 33 of 72 championships. As of 2018, the defending champions are the Golden State Warriors.

Eastern
Conference
WesternConference
Annual events
History
Personalities
Awards and honors
Others

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