Wes Parker

Maurice Wesley "Wes" Parker III (born November 13, 1939) is a former first baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Los Angeles Dodgers from 1964 to 1972.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7] He also played one season in Japan for the Nankai Hawks in 1974.

As of 2009, Parker is a member of the Los Angeles Dodgers organization serving as a representative of the Dodgers Legend Bureau.

Wes Parker
First baseman
Born: November 13, 1939 (age 79)
Evanston, Illinois
Batted: Switch Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 19, 1964, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
Last MLB appearance
October 1, 1972, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
MLB statistics
Batting average.267
Home runs64
Runs batted in470
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Biography

Major League playing career

Parker was part of the Dodgers' 1965 and 1966 World Series teams. Known as one of the slickest fielding first basemen of all time, he won the National League Gold Glove Award for first base every year from 1967 to 1972.[8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18] In 1970, Parker posted a career high batting average of .319 and performed the unusual feat of driving in over 100 runs in a season while hitting no more than 10 home runs.

In a game against the New York Mets on May 7, 1970, Parker hit for the cycle (single, double, triple, and home run in the same game).[19][20] He was the last Los Angeles Dodger to accomplish that feat until Orlando Hudson did it against the San Francisco Giants on April 13, 2009.

On August 21, 2007, Parker was voted the best defensive first baseman in baseball since the inception of the Gold Glove award in 1957, and named to the Major League Baseball All-time Gold Glove Team.[21] He is the only member of the team who is not and will not be in the Baseball Hall of Fame.[22] (Parker himself is not eligible to enter the Hall of Fame as a player because he played in only nine seasons, one less than the minimum required for consideration.)

Parker is the only Dodger to have received the All-Time Gold Glove Team award.[23]

Career Statistics

In nine seasons and 1288 games played, Parker compiled a .267 batting average (1110-4157), with 548 runs scored, 64 home runs, 470 RBI, 532 walks, .351 on-base percentage and .375 slugging percentage. In 11 World Series games (1965 and '66) he hit .278 (10-36). At 1108 games at first base, his primary position, his fielding percentage was .996. He also played at all three outfield positions.

Other endeavors

Parker retired from Major League Baseball after the 1972 season. He worked as a television color analyst for the Cincinnati Reds in 1973, then played in Japanese professional baseball in 1974. He subsequently pursued an acting career and appeared in a number of television roles in the 1970s. He also was a baseball broadcaster for NBC in 1978–79 and for USA Network in 1980–83.

He appeared in episode #17 of The Brady Bunch, "The Undergraduate" (1/23/70), as the boyfriend of Greg Brady's math teacher, on whom Greg has such a huge crush that distracts him from his studies. Parker promises Greg two tickets to Opening Day if he scores an "A" in the class.[24]

Personal life

Parker grew up in West Los Angeles. He attended Claremont McKenna College, but later transferred to USC and graduated from USC with a B.A. in History. [25]

Religious views

Parker served as a Voice of Faith for the ministry of television preacher Dr. Gene Scott. During a 1982 broadcast (index number S-1086-3), Wes spoke with Dr. Scott publicly for over twenty minutes, stating that before coming across Dr. Scott's television program, he had never understood or felt drawn toward Christianity. He explained that it was Gene Scott's intelligent and fact-based approach to teaching that earned his respect and allowed him to build faith. He stated that his earlier exposures to Christianity had no effect, because they were mostly based on simplistic platitudes such as "God is love" which he found unconvincing.

See also

References

  1. ^ Finch, Frank. "Koufax Goes on Relief, Halts Phils", Los Angeles Times, Sports, p. 1, May 25, 1964.
  2. ^ Baker, Bob. "Parker Still not a Starter", Evening Outlook, Sports, p. 15, Santa Monica, California, May 25, 1964.
  3. ^ Park, Charlie. "Happy Dodgers Praise Parker", Los Angeles Times, Sports, June 14, 1964.
  4. ^ Hunter, Bob. "Parker's Polish Makes Dodgers Glitter", The Sporting News, Cover, pp. 3-4, St. Louis, Missouri, Jun. 19, 1965.
  5. ^ "Steal", Los Angeles Times, Sec. D, p. 5, Oct. 10, 1965.
  6. ^ Miller, Dick. "Parker Returned in Favor: Dressen Pays Bavasi Back", Evening Outlook, Sports, p. 25, Santa Monica, California, June 24, 1965.
  7. ^ Finch, Frank. "Sandy's the Greatest – Dodgers Win it!" Los Angeles Times, Sports, Part III, p. 1, Oct. 15, 1965.
  8. ^ "Parker Ties NL Record", Evening Outlook, Sports, p. 24, Santa Monica, California, Dec. 9, 1965.
  9. ^ Hunter, Bob. "Parker Pride – He'll Improve or Get Out", The Sporting News, p. 5, St. Louis, Missouri, Feb. 19, 1966.
  10. ^ Miller, Dick. "Secret Behind Sandy's 20th Victory", Evening Outlook, Sports, p. 14, Santa Monica, California, Aug. 22, 1966.
  11. ^ Miller, Dick. "Healthy, Aggressive Parker Helps Dodgers Win", Evening Outlook, p. 18, Santa Monica, California, June 16, 1966,
  12. ^ Finch, Frank. "Koufax OK, KO's Cardinals for No. 20", Los Angeles Times, Sports, Part III, p. 1, Aug. 22, 1966.
  13. ^ Miller, Dick. "Parker Happy Over Improved Batting: Comeback Sparks Wes' Hopes", Evening Outlook, p. 12, Santa Monica, California, Sep. 4, 1967.
  14. ^ Hafner, Dan. "Parker Lifts Dodgers to Victory Over Phils", Los Angeles Times, Sports, Part III, p. 1, April 17, 1968.
  15. ^ "At Last – Figures Verify Facts: Boyer N.L.'s Best at Hot Sack", The Sporting News, p. 23, St. Louis, Missouri, Dec. 18, 1965.
  16. ^ "Rawlings 1967 Gold Glove Award", The Sporting News, pp. 24-25, St. Louis, Missouri, Nov. 11, 1967.
  17. ^ Sirody, Jim. "Alston Admits LA Has Many Problems: Parker Batting Spree Ends Skein of Losses", Evening Outlook, Sports, Santa Monica, California, July 8, 1968.
  18. ^ Finch, Frank. "A Day in the Life of a Dodger Rookie", Los Angeles Times, Sports, Part III, p. 1, March 20, 1964.
  19. ^ Helfgott, Hali. "Wes Parker, First Baseman", Sports Illustrated, March 22, 1971.
  20. ^ "Baseball's Rising Star: Wes Parker of Los Angeles", Sports Illustrated, Cover Photo, Mar. 23, 1971.
  21. ^ "Their Work with the Glove is Golden," Los Angeles Times, Sports, D5, August 23, 2007.
  22. ^ Kovacevic, Dejan (August 22, 2007). "Pirates' Clemente makes all-time Gold Glove team". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved March 13, 2015.
  23. ^ "Their Work with the Glove is Golden," Los Angeles Times, Sports, D5, August 23, 2007.
  24. ^ Helfgott, Hali. "Wes Parker, First Baseman", Sports Illustrated, March 22, 1971.
  25. ^ https://sabr.org/bioproj/person/545e1b8c

Further reading

External links

Achievements
Preceded by
Jim Fregosi
Hitting for the cycle
May 7, 1970
Succeeded by
Rod Carew
1965 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1965 Los Angeles Dodgers finished the regular-season with a 97–65 record, which earned them the NL pennant by two games over their arch-rivals, the San Francisco Giants. The Dodgers went on to win the World Series in seven games over the Minnesota Twins.

1966 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1966 Los Angeles Dodgers won the National League championship with a 95–67 record (1½ games over the San Francisco Giants), but were swept by the Baltimore Orioles in the World Series.

1967 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1967 Los Angeles Dodgers season marked the end of the franchise's most successful era on the ballpark. One season after losing the World Series to the Baltimore Orioles, the Dodgers declined to a record of 73–89, and finished ahead of only the Houston Astros and the New York Mets in the National League race, 28½ games behind the NL and World Champion St. Louis Cardinals. It was the Dodgers' worst record since the war-affected 1944 season, and their worst peacetime record since 1937. The Dodgers would not return to the postseason until 1974.

1968 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1968 Los Angeles Dodgers had a 76–86 record and finished in seventh place in the National League standings, 21 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals. After the season, the Dodgers underwent some changes among the team management when long time general manager Buzzie Bavasi resigned to take over the expansion San Diego Padres. He was replaced by team vice-president Fresco Thompson. However, Thompson was diagnosed with cancer weeks after taking the job and died in November. Al Campanis became the new general manager for the following season.

1969 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1969 Los Angeles Dodgers finished in fourth place in the new National League Western Division, eight games behind the Atlanta Braves. The Dodgers' record for 1969 was 85–77, which was nine wins better than 1968.

1970 Los Angeles Dodgers season

In 1970, Los Angeles Dodgers owner Walter O'Malley stepped down as team president, turning the reins over to his son Peter, while remaining as the team's chairman. The Dodgers remained competitive, finishing the season in second place, 14½ games behind the NL Champion Cincinnati Reds in the National League West.

1971 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1971 Los Angeles Dodgers finished the season in second place in the National League West.

1972 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1972 Los Angeles Dodgers finished the season 85-70, good for second place in the National League West division.

1982 Major League Baseball season

The 1982 Major League Baseball season. Making up for their playoff miss of the year before, the St. Louis Cardinals won their ninth World Series championship, defeating the Milwaukee Brewers, four games to three.

1983 Major League Baseball season

The 1983 Major League Baseball season ended with the Baltimore Orioles defeating the Philadelphia Phillies in the fifth game of the World Series. Rick Dempsey was named MVP of the Series. The All-Star Game was held on July 6 at Comiskey Park; the American League won by a score of 13–3, with California Angels outfielder Fred Lynn being named MVP.

John Thomas Dye School

The John Thomas Dye School, nicknamed JTD, is an independent private coeducational nonsectarian elementary day school located in the Bel-Air area of Los Angeles, California, serving students in kindergarten through sixth grade.

The school was founded in 1929 as the Brentwood Town and Country School by Cathryn Roberts Dye and her husband John Thomas Dye II with its first classes held in the Dyes' living room, and their son John Thomas Dye III its first student. The first permanent facility was built in 1949 and named the Bel Air Town and Country School, on the site still occupied by the school today. The school building was designed by noted Santa Monica architect John Byers.

In 1959, the School was renamed The John Thomas Dye School in honor of John Thomas Dye III, who, while serving as a fighter pilot, was killed by enemy action in World War II.

List of Gold Glove Award winners at first base

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985 and 2007), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.Keith Hernandez has won the most Gold Gloves at first base, capturing 11 consecutive awards in the National League from 1978 to 1988. In the American League, Don Mattingly won nine times with the New York Yankees for the second-highest total among first basemen, and George Scott won eight awards playing for the Boston Red Sox (three) and the Milwaukee Brewers (five). Victor Pellot, who played most of his major league career under the alias "Vic Power", and Bill White each won seven awards; six-time winners include Wes Parker and J. T. Snow. Steve Garvey and Mark Grace have won four Gold Gloves at the position, as well as Mark Teixeira as of 2010. Eddie Murray is the only member of the Baseball Hall of Fame to win a Gold Glove at first base in either league.Among winners, Garvey has made the most putouts in a season, with 1,606 in 1977. Murray leads American League winners in that category, with 1,538 in 1984. Kevin Youkilis has made the fewest errors in a season, also achieving the highest fielding percentage, when he went the entire 2007 season without an error for a fielding percentage of 1.000. Several players have made one error in a winning season, including Parker in 1968, Snow in 1998, and Rafael Palmeiro in 1999. Parker and Snow achieved a .999 fielding percentage in those seasons, as did Todd Helton in 2001. The player with the most errors in an award-winning season was Scott; he made 19 errors in 1967. Hernandez made the most assists in a season, with 149 in 1986 and 1987, and turned the most double plays in the National League (147) in 1983. The highest double play total in the major leagues belongs to Cecil Cooper, who turned 160 double plays in 1980.Darin Erstad won a Gold Glove as a first baseman in 2004 after winning two awards in the outfield (2000, 2002), making him the only player to win the award as an infielder and an outfielder. In 1999, Palmeiro won the Gold Glove with the Texas Rangers while only appearing in 28 games as a first baseman; he appeared in 135 games as a designated hitter that season, resulting in some controversy over his selection.

List of Los Angeles Dodgers seasons

The Los Angeles Dodgers are the second most successful franchise in the National League and the third-most successful and second-most wealthy in Major League Baseball after the New York Yankees. The franchise was formerly based in Brooklyn and known originally as the "Grays" or "Trolley Dodgers" after the trams which supporters had to avoid to enter games. Later it became known successively as the "Bridegrooms", "Superbas", "Dodgers" and "Robins"; the present "Dodgers" was firmly established in 1932.

The franchise has won the World Series six times and lost a further 13, and like the Yankees and Cardinals have never lost 100 games in a season since World War I, with their worst record since then being in 1992 with 63 wins and their best records ever being in 1953 with 105 wins and both 1942 and 2017 with 104. Their most successful period, between 1947 and 1966 with ten World Series appearances and only two seasons with 71 or more losses (one of them the year they moved to Los Angeles after a dispute over stadium funding), was famous for the Dodgers becoming the first Major League Baseball team to incorporate African American players, led by Jackie Robinson and Roy Campanella.

Rawlings Gold Glove Award

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as simply the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. It is also awarded to women fastpitch softball players in the National Pro Fastpitch as of 2016. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Additionally, a sabermetric component provided by Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) accounts for approximately 25 percent of the vote. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in Major League Baseball; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.

Sandy Koufax's perfect game

Sandy Koufax of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitched a perfect game in the National League against the Chicago Cubs at Dodger Stadium on September 9, 1965. Koufax, by retiring 27 consecutive batters without allowing any to reach base, became the sixth pitcher of the modern era, eighth overall, to throw a perfect game. The game was Koufax's fourth no-hitter, breaking Bob Feller's Major League record of three (and later broken by Nolan Ryan, in 1981). Koufax struck out 14 opposing batters, the most ever recorded in a perfect game, and matched only by San Francisco Giants pitcher, Matt Cain, on June 13, 2012. He also struck out at least one batter in all nine innings (Cain did not strike out a batter in the ninth in his perfect game), the only perfect game pitcher to do so to date.

The game was also notable for the high quality of the performance by the opposing pitcher, Bob Hendley of the Cubs. Hendley gave up only one hit (which did not figure into the scoring) and allowed only two baserunners. Both pitchers had no-hitters intact until the seventh inning. The only run that the Dodgers scored was unearned. The game holds the record for fewest base runners in a perfect game (both teams), with two; the next lowest total is four.

Koufax's perfect game is a memorable part of baseball lore. Jane Leavy's biography of Koufax is structured around a re-telling of the game. An article in Salon.com honoring Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully focuses on his play-by-play call of the game for KFI radio. This game was selected in a 1995 poll of members of the Society for American Baseball Research as the greatest game ever pitched.

Tidewater Council

Tidewater Council is a local council of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). It serves the region of southeastern Virginia and north-eastern North Carolina. This region is often referred to as South Hampton Roads or the Tidewater or Tidewater Virginia area; hence the name of the council. Its Order of the Arrow counterpart is the Blue Heron Lodge; which was founded in 1946 when a team from Octoraro Lodge in Pennsylvania inducted the first members of Blue Heron Lodge.

USA Thursday Game of the Week

The USA Thursday Game of the Week is a former television program that broadcast Major League Baseball games on the USA Network. The network no longer airs sporting events. Sister network NBC Sports Network is the primary cable outlet of NBC Sports.

Wes Parker (footballer)

Wesley Jaye Parker (born 7 December 1983) is an English footballer who plays as a defender for Wingate & Finchley .

He notably played in the Football League for Grimsby Town from 2002 until 2004 before moving on to play for Gainsborough Trinity, and Boston United.

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