Wayne Trimble

Wayne Allen Trimble (born December 10, 1944) is a former American football defensive back who played one season with the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the 49ers in the fourth round of the 1967 NFL Draft. He played college football at the University of Alabama and attended Cullman High School in Cullman, Alabama.[1]

Wayne Trimble
No. 24
Position:Defensive back
Personal information
Born:December 10, 1944 (age 74)
Cullman, Alabama
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:203 lb (92 kg)
Career information
High school:Cullman (AL)
College:Alabama
NFL Draft:1967 / Round: 4 / Pick: 91
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ "WAYNE TRIMBLE". profootballarchives.com. Retrieved December 12, 2014.

External links

1963 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1963 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1963 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 69th overall and 30th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his sixth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished season with nine wins and two losses (9–2 overall, 6–2 in the SEC) and with a victory over Ole Miss in the Sugar Bowl.

The Crimson Tide opened the season with wins at Georgia, against Tulane in Mobile and at Vanderbilt en route to a 3–0 start. However, in their fourth game, Alabama was upset by Florida in what was coach Bryant's first loss at Denny Stadium as head coach. They rebounded the week that followed with a shutout victory over Tennessee and then won their next three games against Houston, Mississippi State and Georgia Tech.

In the annual Iron Bowl against Auburn, the Crimson Tide were defeated for the first time by the Tigers since the 1958 season. Although they lost, immediately after the game Alabama accepted an invitation to play Ole Miss in the Sugar Bowl. Before the bowl, the Crimson Tide defeated Miami in their final game of the regular season. They then closed the season with a victory over Ole Miss in the Sugar Bowl.

1964 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1964 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1964 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 70th overall and 31st season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his seventh year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished season with ten wins and one loss (10–1 overall, 8–0 in the SEC), as SEC champions and with a loss to Texas in the Orange Bowl. As the major wire services at that time awarded their national champions prior to the start of bowl season, Alabama was also recognized as national champions by the AP and UPI before their loss to Texas. After the bowl games, the Football Writers Association of America as stated in 1964 NCAA University Division football season named the undefeated Arkansas Razorbacks as the national champions. The Razorbacks defeated Texas during the regular season.

The Crimson Tide opened the season ranked in the No. 6 position with wins at Tuscaloosa against Georgia, against Tulane in Mobile and at Birmingham against Vanderbilt. After a victory over NC State in their first non-conference game of the season, Alabama defeated Tennessee in their first road game of the season at Neyland Stadium. The Crimson Tide then returned to Tuscaloosa where they defeated a Steve Spurrier-led Florida team on homecoming before their second road victory at Mississippi State at Jackson.

Alabama then defeated LSU in a newly expanded Legion Field and captured the SEC championship, and the next week defeated Georgia Tech in what was the final game of their annual series. In the annual Iron Bowl against Auburn, the Crimson Tide completed an undefeated regular season with their victory and accepted a bid to play Texas in the Orange Bowl. Although recognized as national champions at the conclusion of the regular season, Alabama closed the season with a loss to the Texas Longhorns in the Orange Bowl.

After the season, Joe Namath was selected as the first overall pick by the New York Jets in the 1965 AFL Draft. In addition to Namath, eleven other lettermen from the 1964 squad were drafted into the National Football League.

1965 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1965 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1965 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 71st overall and 32nd season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his eighth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished season with nine wins, one loss and one tie (9–1–1 overall, 6–1–1 in the SEC), as SEC champions and with a victory over Nebraska in the Orange Bowl. Alabama was also recognized as national champions by the AP Poll after their Orange Bowl win.

Alabama opened the season ranked No. 5, but were upset by Georgia 18–17 in the first game of the season. They rebounded with their first win of the season over Tulane and followed that with a 17–16 win over Ole Miss in a game in which Alabama had to rally from a nine-point fourth quarter deficit for the victory. The next week, the Crimson Tide defeated Vanderbilt in Nashville before they returned home for their rivalry game against Tennessee. Against the Volunteers, the score was deadlocked 7–7 in the closing seconds, but Alabama had driven to the Tennessee four-yard line. Ken Stabler believing that it was third down, threw the ball out of bounds with six seconds left to stop the clock. However, it was actually fourth down, possession went to Tennessee, and the game ended in a tie.

After the tie, the Crimson Tide won five in a row over Florida State, Mississippi State, LSU, South Carolina and Auburn en route to Bryant's fourth SEC title at Alabama. Because the Associated Press was holding its vote until after the bowl games instead of before for the first time, No. 4 Alabama still had a chance to win the national championship when they played No. 3 Nebraska in the Orange Bowl. On New Year's Day, No. 1 Michigan State lost in the Rose Bowl and No. 2 Arkansas lost in the Cotton Bowl Classic, and Alabama defeated Nebraska 39–28 in the Orange Bowl and captured its third AP National Championship in five years.

1965 Orange Bowl

The 1965 Orange Bowl, part of the 1964 bowl season, took place on January 1, 1965, at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida. It matched the top-ranked Alabama Crimson Tide of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), and the #5 Texas Longhorns of the Southwest Conference (SWC). Texas built an early lead and won 21–17.

This was the first Orange Bowl game played at night, and the first live national network telecast of a college football game during prime time. It also was the first Orange Bowl in twelve years not to include a team from the Big Eight Conference.

1966 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1966 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1966 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 72nd overall and 33rd season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his ninth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished season undefeated with eleven wins (11–0 overall, 6–0 in the SEC), as SEC co-champions and with a victory over Nebraska in the Sugar Bowl.

Alabama opened the season with a victory over Louisiana Tech in Birmingham and followed that with a victory at Ole Miss for their first conference win of the season. The Crimson Tide then returned home and defeated Clemson in the first Tuscaloosa game of the season before they traveled to Knoxville for their annual rival game against Tennessee. In the game, Alabama trailed the Volunteers 10–0 in the fourth quarter before they rallied for an 11–10 victory that saw Tennessee miss a game-winning field goal in the final minute of play.

Alabama then alternated home games between Birmingham and Tuscaloosa over the next four weeks and defeated Vanderbilt, Mississippi State, LSU and South Carolina in each game. After they defeated Southern Miss in their annual Mobile game, the Crimson Tide defeated Auburn in the Iron Bowl and captured a share of the SEC championship. In the January that followed, Alabama then defeated Nebraska in the Sugar Bowl and finished the season undefeated. Although they were the only undefeated and untied college team at the conclusion of the year, Alabama was not selected as national champions for the season. On the 1966 squad, Green Bay Packers head coach Vince Lombardi stated: "I don't know, we haven't played Alabama yet" when asked how it felt to have the world's greatest football team for the season after his Packers won Super Bowl I.

1967 NFL/AFL Draft

The 1967 National Football League draft was conducted March 14–15, 1967, at the Gotham Hotel in New York City. It was the first common draft with the AFL, part of the AFL–NFL merger agreement of June 1966.

This draft was delayed as new guidelines were established; redshirt (or "future") players were no longer eligible. It began on a Tuesday in mid-March; the previous two years the leagues held their separate drafts on the final Saturday of November, immediately following the college football regular season.

1967 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1967 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 18th year with the National Football League. The 49ers had two first round picks and drafted Heisman Trophy winner Steve Spurrier with one of those draft picks.

1967 Sugar Bowl

The 1967 Sugar Bowl, part of the 1966 bowl game season, was played on Monday, January 2, at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, Louisiana. Undefeated Alabama Crimson Tide of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) met the Nebraska Cornhuskers of the Big Eight Conference (Big 8). Alabama was favored by nine points, and won 34–7.

Cullman, Alabama

Cullman is a city in and the county seat of Cullman County, Alabama, United States. It is located along Interstate 65, about 50 miles (80 km) north of Birmingham and about 55 miles (89 km) south of Huntsville. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 14,775, with an estimated population of 15,385 in 2017.

Cullman High School

Cullman High School is the largest public high school in the city of Cullman, Alabama as well as Cullman County, Alabama. The school is classified as a 6A school and belongs to the Cullman City School District.

As of the 2010-2011 school year, the school had an enrollment of more than 930 students and 63 teachers, in grades 9-12, with an FTE ratio of 15.6.

Cullman High School is routinely recognized as one of the top public high schools in the state of Alabama in all areas: academic, athletic, and artistic. The school is also known for offering one of the most diverse curricula in Alabama with students having over 130 courses to choose from, including advanced academic courses (Advanced Placement, honors, dual-enrollment), specialized career/technical electives, technology/communications (computer programming, television production), culinary arts, home/economics, athletic choices (30+ sports teams), and dozens of courses in the fine arts (including numerous band courses, string/orchestral studies, choral courses, drama courses, visual arts courses, etc.).Cullman High School is also known for the high level of achievement of its students. Over the years, Cullman High School has been home to numerous National Merit Scholars, Presidential Scholars, and Horatio Alger National Scholars.

Legacy sediment

Legacy sediment (LS) is the term used to describe depositional bodies of sediment inherited from the increase of human activities since the Neolithic. These include a broad range of land use and land cover changes, such as agricultural clearance, lumbering and clearance of native vegetation, mining, road building, urbanization, as well as alterations brought to river systems in the form of dams and other engineering structures meant to control and regulate natural fluvial processes (erosion, deposition, lateral migration, meandering). The concept of LS is used in geomorphology, ecology, as well as in water quality and toxicological studies.

LS is distributed in spatially heterogeneous ways throughout a landscape and accumulates to form various landforms. It can progress through the fluvial system through facies changes from hillslope colluvium, to floodplain and wetland alluvium, to fine-grained lacustrine and estuarine slackwater deposits. The temporal nature of LS is time-transgressive, meaning that initiation and peak rates of deposition can take place at different times within a fluvial system, as well as at different times between regions. The intermittent transport of LS can be thought of as a cascading system that reworks LS deposits from hillslopes, into channels and onto floodplains, such that anthropogenic sediment will be mixed with and non-anthropogenic sediment.River systems record past and present imprints of anthropogenically-forced changes to the environment. LS is an element of change in this context, as it drives fluxes of energy and matter (connectivity) through fluvial systems and provides indication of past land-uses and river dynamics that can inform future trajectories of river response. In this sense, acknowledging the concept of LS can benefit informed policy development in stream restorationn, water quality and sediment budget management, protection of aquatic ecosystems, and flood risk. Moreover, the implications of legacy effects associated with anthropogenically modified sediment dynamics are critical in the context of ecosystem services.

List of Alabama Crimson Tide players in the NFL draft

The University of Alabama Crimson Tide football team has had 355 players drafted into the National Football League (NFL) since the league began holding drafts in 1936. This includes 61 players taken in the first round and two overall number one picks, Harry Gilmer in the 1948 NFL draft and Joe Namath in the 1965 AFL draft. 29former Alabama players have been selected to a Pro Bowl, 31 have won a championship with their respective teams and eight have been elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Each NFL franchise seeks to add new players through the annual NFL draft. The draft rules were last updated in 2009. The team with the worst record the previous year picks first, the next-worst team second, and so on. Teams that did not make the playoffs are ordered by their regular-season record with any remaining ties broken by strength of schedule. Playoff participants are sequenced after non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl). Prior to the merger agreements in 1966, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues held a multiple-round "common draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the common draft became the NFL draft.

List of Alabama Crimson Tide starting quarterbacks

This is a list of every Alabama Crimson Tide football team quarterback and the years they participated on the Alabama Crimson Tide football team.

Alabama quarterbacks have played prominent roles in American society off the gridiron as well. Both Farley Moody and Charlie Joplin died while serving in the First World War.

List of San Francisco 49ers players

These players have appeared in at least one regular season or postseason game for the San Francisco 49ers NFL franchise.

San Francisco 49ers draft history

This page is a list of San Francisco 49ers NFL Draft selections. The first draft the 49ers participated in was the 1950 NFL Draft, in which they made Leo Nomellini of Minnesota their first ever selection.

Trimble (surname)

Trimble is a surname. Notable people with the name include:

Allen Trimble, Governor of Ohio, 1822 & 1826–1830

Angela Trimble, birthname of the singer Deborah Harry

Andrew Trimble, Irish rugby footballer

Barbara Margaret Trimble, British crime/thriller writer

Bjo Trimble, science fiction writer

Bobb Trimble, folk musician

Carey A. Trimble, Hawaii politician

David Trimble (1944–), Northern Irish politician, Conservative Party

David Trimble (congressman)

Frederick H. Trimble, American architect

Gail Trimble, captain of the 2009 University Challenge champions from Corpus Christi, Oxford

Glenn Trimble, Australian cricketer

Gordon Trimble, American politician

Isaac Ridgeway Trimble, Confederate General in the Civil War

James Trimble (disambiguation):

James William Trimble, U.S. Representative from Arkansas

James W. Trimble (football coach), American college football coach

James Trimble (Canadian politician), Speaker of the British Columbia legislature

Jerry Trimble, American actor and martial artist

Jim Trimble, American football coach

Joan Trimble (1915–2000), Irish composer and pianist

Joe Trimble, baseball pitcher

John Trimble, cofounder of the Grange farmers movement in the USA

John Trimble (politician), U.S. Representative from Tennessee

Kenny Trimble, American musician

Laurence Trimble, silent movie star, writer, and director

Lawrence S. Trimble (1825–1904), U.S. Representative from Kentucky

Lester Trimble, American music critic and composer

Louis Trimble, American writer

Marcia Trimble, American murder victim

Melo Trimble (born 1995), American basketball player

Robert Trimble, Associate Justice, U.S. Supreme Court, 1826–1828

Sam Trimble (cricketer), Australian cricketer

Violet Trimble, fictional character in Drive (TV series)

Valerie Trimble (1917 - 1980), irisch pianist and sister of Joan Trimble

Virginia Trimble, American astronomer

Vivian Trimble, American musician

Wayne Trimble, American football player

William A. Trimble, U.S. Senator from Ohio

Zac Tubbs

Zac Tubbs (born May 14, 1984) is a former Division I athlete who earned athletic honors on the high school, collegiate, and professional level. He was most recently named to the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette's All-Arkansas SEC Third Team on August 6, 2017.

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