Warmsworth

Warmsworth is a village and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England. It had a population of 3,855 in 2001[1] and 3,887 at time of the 2011 Census.[2] The village lies along the A1(M) Doncater Bypass and the A630. The River Don runs adjacent to Warmsworth, as well as the train line from Doncaster to Sheffield.

Warmsworth is bounded by Doncaster and the civil parishes of Sprotbrough, Edlington, Conisbrough, Cadeby and Balby. It lies 3.9 miles (6.3 km) from the centre of Doncaster. Warmsworth is within the catchment area for Warmsworth Primary School and Sir Thomas Wharton Academy.

Warmsworth
Warmsworth Hall - geograph.org.uk - 101209

Warmsworth Hall
Warmsworth is located in South Yorkshire
Warmsworth
Warmsworth
Location within South Yorkshire
Population3,887 (2011 Census)
Civil parish
  • Warmsworth
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townDONCASTER
Postcode districtDN4
Dialling code01302
PoliceSouth Yorkshire
FireSouth Yorkshire
AmbulanceYorkshire
EU ParliamentYorkshire and the Humber
WebsiteWarmsworth Parish Council

History

Until 1974, Warmsworth was part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, when it then became part of the new county of South Yorkshire. Warmsworth was mentioned in the 11th century Domesday Book, a detailed survey and valuation of all the land held by the King William I and his chief tenants. At this time it was recorded as Wemesford. The name gradually changed to Wormsford, and then to the present day Warmsworth. It has been suggested that "ford" indicated that it was close to the river's edge, and the "Wemes" or "Worm" meant the most sheltered site in that area.[3]

The church is a rectory, dedicated to St Peter, in the deanery of Doncaster.[4] Also known as The White Church, it was consecrated in 1942 to replace a small early 19th-century church on a different site. The church was designed after a period which the rector had spent in California, and his experiences there influenced the whitewashed brick appearance of the building.[5]

Warmsworth was the home of the Quaker Thomas Aldham, who was instrumental, with George Fox, in founding the nearby Balby meeting (congregation).[6] The parish included Carr House, where Leonard Childers bred the famous racehorse Flying Childers.

Warmsworth Hall

Warmsworth Hall is a Grade II* listed building built in 1702–03 for John Battie II. It is a smaller version of Belton House near Grantham, built to a compact H-plan. It remained a dwelling until the 1950s, when it became the headquarters of British Ropes Ltd, and later a hotel.[7]

Dolomite Quarry

Next to the village is a dolomite limestone quarry operated by Sibelco. It is the only site in the region producing industrial minerals on a major scale.[8]

References

  1. ^ Office for National Statistics: Census 2001: Parish Headcounts: Doncaster Retrieved 2009-08-27
  2. ^ "Civil Parish population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 9 March 2016.
  3. ^ A Short History of Warmsworth [1] Retrieved 17 September 2018.
  4. ^ The Ancient Parish of WARMSWORTH Retrieved 2010-11-29
  5. ^ A Yorkshire Town: The Making of Doncaster [2] Retrieved 17 September 2018.
  6. ^ History of Doncaster Friends [3] Retrieved 30 September 2011.
  7. ^ A Yorkshire Town: The Making of Doncaster [4] Retrieved 17 September 2018
  8. ^ The Quarrying of Magnesian Limestone for Aggregate in the Yorkshire and Humber Region [5] Retrieved 17 September 2018
2010 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2010 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 6 May 2010 to elect on third of Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council in South Yorkshire, England as part of the 2010 United Kingdom local elections. The 2010 General Election also took place on the same day.

The election resulted in the Labour Party taking control of the council from No overall control for the first time since 2003 after gaining eight seats overall. After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 34

Liberal Democrats 10

Conservative 9

Others 11

2011 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2011 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 5 May 2011 to elect one third of Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council as part of the 2011 local elections in the United Kingdom.The election resulted in the Labour Party retaining its control of the council, increasing its majority by seven seats. The Liberal Democrats lost four of the five seats it was defending, all of which were gained by Labour. After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 43

Conservative 9

Liberal Democrats 6

Others 5

2012 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2012 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 3 May 2012 to elect one third of Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council in South Yorkshire, England. This was on the same day as other 2012 United Kingdom local elections.

The Labour Party retained its control of the council with an increased majority after increasing its vote share by 21.7% and gaining three seats from the Liberal Democrats and five from various independents. The Conservatives held the three seats it was defending with a reduced vote share. After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 50

Conservative 9

Liberal Democrats 3

Others 1

2014 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2014 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 22 May 2014 as part of the 2014 local elections in the United Kingdom. One third of 63 seats were up for election. The 2014 European Parliament Elections were also held on the same day.

The election resulted in the Labour Party retaining its control of the council, with a slightly reduced majority after losing two seats overall. UKIP won a substantial number of votes at this election, increasing its vote share by 30.5%, but only won a single seat. The Liberal Democrats lost the only seat they were defending. After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 48

Conservative 8

UKIP 1

Others 6

2015 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2015 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 7 May 2015 to elect all members of Doncaster Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections. Due to boundary changes all 55 seats were up for election.

The election resulted in the Labour Party retaining control of the council, with a majority of 27 seats.

2017 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2017 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 4 May 2017 as part of the 2017 local elections in the United Kingdom. The election of the Mayor of Doncaster also took place on the same day. All 55 councillors were elected from 21 wards which returned either two or three councillors each by first-past-the-post voting for a four-year term of office. The election resulted in the Labour Party retaining control of the Council, with an increased majority.Previously, the council was elected by thirds every year except the year in which county council elections took place in other parts of England. In 2015, the whole council was elected due to boundary changes to the wards and it was decided that the whole council would be elected every four years in future from 2017, so that the council elections would coincide with the election of the Mayor of Doncaster in future.

A630 road

The A630 is an A road in the United Kingdom. It runs between Sheffield city centre (53.3762°N 1.3998°W / 53.3762; -1.3998 (A630 road (southwestern end))) and junction 4 of the M18 motorway (53.5400°N 1.0229°W / 53.5400; -1.0229 (A630 road (northeastern end))), passing through Rotherham and Doncaster on the way. The road is entirely in South Yorkshire.

Aubrey Scriven

Aubrey Scriven (7 July 1904 – c. 1988) was an English professional footballer who played as an outside left for Birmingham, Bradford City and Bristol City in the Football League. He also played non-league football for Warmsworth, Denaby United, Worcester City and Brierley Hill Alliance.

Doncaster (York Road) railway station

Doncaster (York Road) railway station was built as a terminus for services on the Hull and Barnsley and Great Central Joint Railway in Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England. It was reached by a triangular junction from the main line just outside town. The station was set at the north end of town, just beyond the Doncaster Avoiding Line, in the fork of the old A1 and the A19 (York Road).

The line and its stations were ready for opening on 1 May 1916 but its five passenger stations, at Snaith & Pollington, Sykehouse, Thorpe-in-Balne, Doncaster (York Road) and Warmsworth never saw a passenger train. The route duplicated that of other railways in the area and the stations were some way from the villages they purported to serve.

The station was kept fully intact until the late 1960s when demolition finally came.

The only passenger trains to work over the line were enthusiasts specials, the last of these was the "Doncaster Decoy", which ran on 5 October 1968.

Edlington

Edlington is a town and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England, lying to the south west of Doncaster and Warmsworth. It has a population of 8,276. The original parish town of Edlington is now known as Old Edlington; adjacent, and to the north, is New Edlington. It is often referred to by locals as 'Edlo'.

Since 1974 Edlington has been part of the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in the metropolitan county of South Yorkshire. It had, since 1894, formed part of Doncaster Rural District in the West Riding of Yorkshire.

Flying Childers

Flying Childers was a famous undefeated 18th century Thoroughbred racehorse, foaled in 1714 at Carr House, Warmsworth, Doncaster, and is often cited as the first truly great racehorse in the history of Thoroughbreds and the first to catch the public imagination.

Inigo Thomas

Francis Inigo Thomas (25 December 1865 – 27 March 1950) was a British artist and garden designer.Thomas was born in Warmsworth, Yorkshire, the fifth son of Rev. Charles Edward Thomas and Georgiana Mary Hely-Hutchinson, daughter of Hon. Henry Hely-Hutchinson. She was the granddaughter of Hon. Francis Hely-Hutchinson and niece of the 3rd Earl of Donoughmore. He was a cousin of Sir Charles Inigo Thomas, also known as Inigo. Thomas was the nephew of William Brodrick Thomas (1811–98), one of the principal garden designers of the latter half of the 19th century.Thomas trained in the office of the architects G. F. Bodley and Thomas Garner.As well as designing numerous formal gardens, he illustrated Reginald Blomfield's book The Formal Garden in England, which was published in 1892.

New Edlington

New Edlington is an area of the town of Edlington, Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England, lying close to Warmsworth and the A630 road.

River Don Navigation

The River Don Navigation was the result of early efforts to make the River Don in South Yorkshire, England, navigable between Fishlake and Sheffield. The Dutch engineer Cornelius Vermuyden had re-routed the mouth of the river in 1626, to improve drainage, and the new works included provision for navigation, but the scheme did not solve the problem of flooding, and the Dutch River was cut in 1635 to link the new channel to Goole. The first Act of Parliament to improve navigation on the river was obtained in 1726, by a group of Cutlers based in Sheffield; the Corporation of Doncaster obtained an Act in the following year for improvements to the lower river. Locks and lock cuts were built, and, by 1751, the river was navigable to Tinsley.

The network was expanded by the opening of the Stainforth and Keadby Canal in 1802, linking to the River Trent, the Dearne and Dove Canal in 1804, linking to Barnsley, and the Sheffield Canal in 1819, which provided better access to Sheffield. All three were bought out by the Don Navigation in the 1840s, after which the canals were owned by a series of railway companies. The Sheffield and South Yorkshire Navigation Company was created in 1889 and eventually succeeded in buying back the canals and the Don Navigation in 1895, but plans for expansion were hampered by a lack of capital. One success was the opening of the New Junction Canal in 1905, jointly funded with the Aire and Calder Navigation.

During the 20th century, there were several plans to upgrade the Don, to handle larger craft. It was eventually upgraded to take 700-tonne barges in 1983, but the scheme was a little too late, as an anticipated rise in commercial traffic did not occur. Most use of the navigation is now by leisure boaters, whose boats are dwarfed by the huge locks. The navigation and river are crossed by a wide variety of bridges, from a medieval bridge complete with a chapel on it, one of only three to have survived in Britain, to a motorway viaduct that pioneered the use of rubber bearings and a new waterproofing system. In between are a number of railway bridges, including two that were built to carry the internal railway system at the Blackburn Meadows sewage treatment plant. The former railway viaduct at Conisbrough now carries cyclists 113 feet (34 m) above the Don, as part of the National Cycle Network.

The final section to Bramwith is known as the River Dun Navigation.

Sir Thomas Wharton Academy

Sir Thomas Wharton Academy is a coeducational academy school and sixth form located in Edlington, Doncaster, England. It accepts pupils from the surrounding areas including Balby, Braithwell, Conisbrough, Edlington, Loversall, Micklebring, Tickhill, Wadworth, Warmsworth and Woodfield Plantation.

Its feeder schools are Warmsworth Primary, Edlington Hilltop, Edlington Victoria, Wadworth Primary, Tickhill Estfeld and Tickhill St Mary's.

Sir Thomas Wharton Academy operates a tutor group system. In the past groups contained pupils of all ages, but in 2009 new tutor groups were formed which included two to four members of each year group, including members of the Sixth Form. Form groups were then changed again at the start of the 2014 school year to include only students up to Year 11. Sixth Form students now have their own specialised form groups. Then in 2017, Form Groups were changed again for Year 11 students to have their own Form Groups.

The school operates a house system, introduced at the same time as mixed age tutor groups. All pupils and members of staff are separated into one of four houses. Each house has its own pastoral care team which deals with student issues. The four houses are named after country halls: Cusworth (Purple), Brodsworth (Green), Chatsworth (Yellow) and Wentworth (Red). Different coloured ties are used to identify to which house students belong.

Sprotborough (SYR) railway station

Sprotborough (SYR) railway station was situated on the South Yorkshire Railway's line between Doncaster Cherry Tree Lane and Conisbrough. The station was intended to serve both Sprotborough and Warmsworth, near Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England.

The station was located where the Warmsworth to Sprotborough road crosses the line over the deep limestone cutting and was approached by a covered flight of 66 steps to the Sheffield-bound platform. The station had two flanking platforms and a small wooden shelter which served as both ticket office and waiting room. Following the closure of the station on 1 January 1875 this structure served as a platelayers hut until the mid-1950s.

Strafforth and Tickhill

Strafforth and Tickhill, originally known as Strafforth, was the southernmost wapentake in the West Riding of Yorkshire, England. The west of the district, plus a detached area in the east, constituted the Upper Division, while the central area and a detached part in the extreme east constituted the Lower Division.

Parishes in the Upper Division included Aston, Barnby Dun, Braithwell, Conisbrough, Dinnington, Ecclesfield, Firbeck, Handsworth, Harthill, Hatfield, Hooton Roberts, Laughton-en-le-Morthen, Maltby, Ravenfield, Rawmarsh, Rotherham, Sheffield, South Anston, Sprotborough, Thorpe Salvin, Thrybergh, Todwick, Treeton, Wales, Wath-upon-Dearne, Whiston, Wickersley and parts of Finningley.

The Lower Division included the parishes of Adwick-le-Street, Adwick-upon-Dearne, Arksey, Armthorpe, Bolton-upon-Dearne, Brodsworth, Darfield, Doncaster, Fishlake, High Melton, Hooton Pagnell, Kirk Sandal, Mexborough, Rossington, Thorne, Thurnscoe, Tickhill, Wadworth, Warmsworth, parts of Blyth, Nottinghamshire and the extra-parochial area of Hampole.

The original meeting place of the wapentake is unknown, but may have been the future site of Conisbrough Castle.The Earldom of Strafford takes its name from a variant of this district name, wherein the first incumbent Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford originated.

Tim Boon

Timothy James Boon (born 1 November 1961 in Balby, Doncaster, Yorkshire) is a former English cricketer who used to be the coach of Leicestershire.

Boon had a successful playing career predominantly with Leicestershire. However he started his young playing career with his local club Warmsworth CC. He played his first game in 1980 and his last in 1995 and passed 1000 runs seven times. He had a spell with KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa, and later played for Norfolk.

In recent years Boon has made more of an impression as a coach. He was named the England U-19 coach in 1999. Later Boon was given the job of England's video analyst and was instrumental in helping England win the 2005 Ashes series.

Boon was offered the job of Leicestershire coach in 2006 as a successor to James Whitaker. He went on to be the coach of the England Under 19 Cricket Team.

Warmsworth railway station

Warmsworth railway station was a railway station to serve the village of Warmsworth, South Yorkshire, England and was on the Hull and Barnsley and Great Central Joint Railway. It was built ready for the opening of the line on 1 May 1916 with flanking platforms and facilities. However, although the line opened to goods traffic on that date, along with the other stations on the line it never opened for passengers.

The only passenger trains to operate over the line were enthusiasts' specials, the last of these being the "Doncaster Decoy" on 5 October 1968

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