Walter Camp Award

The Walter Camp Player of the Year Award is given annually to the collegiate American football player of the year, as decided by a group of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I FBS head coaches and sports information directors under the auspices of the Walter Camp Football Foundation; the award is named for Walter Camp, an important and influential figure in the development of the sport. Three players have won the award twice: Colt McCoy of the University of Texas in 2008 and 2009, Archie Griffin of Ohio State in 1974 and 1975, and O. J. Simpson of USC in 1967 and 1968.

Walter Camp Player of the Year Award
Wacamplogo
Walter Camp Foundation logo
Given forPlayer of the Year in college football
CountryUnited States
Presented byWalter Camp Football Foundation
History
First award1967
Most recentTua Tagovailoa, Alabama
Websitehttp://www.waltercamp.org/

Winners

Year Winner Position School Ref
1967 O. J. Simpson Running back USC [1]
1968 O. J. Simpson Running back USC [1]
1969 Steve Owens Running back Oklahoma
1970 Jim Plunkett Quarterback Stanford
1971 Pat Sullivan Quarterback Auburn
1972 Johnny Rodgers Running back Nebraska
1973 John Cappelletti Running back Penn State
1974 Archie Griffin Running back Ohio State
1975 Archie Griffin Running back Ohio State
1976 Tony Dorsett Running back Pittsburgh
1977 Ken MacAfee Tight end Notre Dame
1978 Billy Sims Running back Oklahoma
1979 Charles White Running back USC
1980 Hugh Green Linebacker Pittsburgh
1981 Marcus Allen Running back USC
1982 Herschel Walker Running back Georgia
1983 Mike Rozier Running back Nebraska
1984 Doug Flutie Quarterback Boston College
1985 Bo Jackson Running back Auburn
1986 Vinny Testaverde Quarterback Miami (FL)
1987 Tim Brown Wide receiver Notre Dame
1988 Barry Sanders Running back Oklahoma State
1989 Anthony Thompson Running back Indiana [2]
1990 Raghib Ismail Wide receiver Notre Dame
1991 Desmond Howard Wide receiver Michigan
1992 Gino Torretta Quarterback Miami (FL)
1993 Charlie Ward Quarterback Florida State [3]
1994 Rashaan Salaam Running back Colorado
1995 Eddie George Running back Ohio State
1996 Danny Wuerffel Quarterback Florida
1997 Charles Woodson Cornerback Michigan
1998 Ricky Williams Running back Texas
1999 Ron Dayne Running back Wisconsin
2000 Josh Heupel Quarterback Oklahoma [4]
2001 Eric Crouch Quarterback Nebraska [5]
2002 Larry Johnson Running back Penn State
2003 Larry Fitzgerald Wide receiver Pittsburgh
2004 Matt Leinart Quarterback USC
2005 Reggie Bush Running back USC
2006 Troy Smith Quarterback Ohio State
2007 Darren McFadden Running back Arkansas
2008 Colt McCoy Quarterback Texas
2009 Colt McCoy Quarterback Texas
2010 Cam Newton Quarterback Auburn
2011 Andrew Luck Quarterback Stanford
2012 Manti Te'o Linebacker Notre Dame [6]
2013 Jameis Winston Quarterback Florida State
2014 Marcus Mariota Quarterback Oregon
2015 Derrick Henry Running back Alabama
2016 Lamar Jackson Quarterback Louisville [7]
2017 Baker Mayfield Quarterback Oklahoma
2018 Tua Tagovailoa Quarterback Alabama

Awards won by school

This is a list of the schools that have had a player win the Walter Camp Award. USC has the most award winners, with six. In total, players from 22 different schools have won the Walter Camp Award.

School Trophies
won
USC 6*
Ohio State 4*
Oklahoma 4
Notre Dame 4
Auburn 3
Nebraska 3
Pittsburgh 3
Texas 3*
Florida State 2
Miami 2
Michigan 2
Penn State 2
Stanford 2
Alabama 2
Arkansas 1
Boston College 1
Colorado 1
Florida 1
Georgia 1
Indiana 1
Louisville 1
Oklahoma State 1
Oregon 1
Wisconsin 1

*Designates double award winner

See also

References

General
  • "Walter Camp Player of the Year Award Winners". Sports Reference. Retrieved March 1, 2017.
Footnotes
  1. ^ a b "College Football Awards - Walter Camp Award". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 1, 2017.
  2. ^ "Coaches, SID's vote Thompson best". Daily News. Associated Press. November 27, 1989. p. 10. Retrieved October 17, 2016.
  3. ^ "Ward receives Walter Camp Award". The News-Journal. Associated Press. November 30, 1993. p. 6B. Retrieved October 17, 2016.
  4. ^ "Heupel, Stoops win Camp awards". The Daily Gazette. November 29, 2000. p. C3. Retrieved October 17, 2016.
  5. ^ "Crouch takes O'Brien and Camp Awards". McCook Daily Gazette. Associated Press. December 7, 2001. p. 12. Retrieved October 17, 2016.
  6. ^ Scheuring, Ian. "Manti Te'o wins Maxwell, Bednarik, Walter Camp player-of-the-year awards". Hawaii News Now. Retrieved January 8, 2017.
  7. ^ "Louisville QB Lamar Jackson wins Camp, Maxwell awards". The Boston Globe. December 9, 2016. Retrieved December 10, 2016.

External links

  • Awards webpage. Walter Camp Football Foundation official website
1967 USC Trojans football team

The 1967 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1967 college football season. In their eighth year under head coach John McKay, the Trojans compiled a 10–1 record (6–1 against conference opponents), won the Athletic Association of Western Universities (AAWU or Pac-8) championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 258 to 87. The team was ranked #1 in the final AP and Coaches Polls.

Steve Sogge led the team in passing, completing 75 of 151 passes for 1,032 yards with seven touchdowns and seven interceptions. O. J. Simpson led the team in rushing with 291 carries for 1,543 yards and 13 touchdowns. Earl McCullouch led the team in receiving with 30 catches for 540 yards and five touchdowns. Simpson won the Walter Camp Award.

1968 USC Trojans football team

The 1968 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1968 college football season. In their ninth year under head coach John McKay, the Trojans compiled a 9–1–1 record (6–0 against conference opponents), won the Pacific-8 Conference (Pac-8) championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 259 to 168. The team was ranked #2 in the final Coaches Poll and #4 in the final AP Poll.

Steve Sogge led the team in passing, completing 122 of 207 passes for 1,454 yards with nine touchdowns and nine interceptions. O. J. Simpson led the team in rushing with 383 carries for 1,880 yards and 23 touchdowns. Jim Lawrence led the team in receiving with 26 catches for 386 yards and two touchdowns. Simpson won both the Heisman Trophy and the Walter Camp Award.

1980 College Football All-America Team

The 1980 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1980.

The NCAA recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1980 season. They are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), and (4) the United Press International (UPI). The AP, UPI, and FWAA teams were selected by polling of sports writers and/or broadcasters. The AFCA team was based on a poll of coaches. Other notable selectors, though not recognized by the NCAA as official, included Football News, a national weekly football publication, the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).Fourteen players were unanimous picks by all four official selectors. Seven of the unanimous picks were offensive players: (1) South Carolina running back and 1980 Heisman Trophy winner, George Rogers; (2) Georgia running back and 1982 Heisman Trophy winner, Herschel Walker; (3) Purdue quarterback and 1980 Sammy Baugh Trophy winner, Mark Hermann; (4) Stanford wide receiver Ken Margerum; (5) Purdue tight end Dave Young; (6) Pittsburgh tackle Mark May; and (7) Notre Dame center John Scully. The seven unanimous picks on the defensive side were: (1) Pittsburgh defensive end Hugh Green, who won the 1980 Walter Camp Award, Maxwell Award, Lombardi Award, and Sporting News and UPI College Football Player of the Year awards; (2) Alabama defensive end E.J. Junior; (3) Houston defensive tackle Leonard Mitchell; (4) Baylor linebacker Mike Singletary; (5) North Carolina linebacker Lawrence Taylor; (6) UCLA defensive back Kenny Easley; and (7) USC defensive back Ronnie Lott.

In 1989, The New York Times published a follow-up on the 1980 AP All-America team. The article reported that 20 of the 22 first-team players went on to play in the NFL, with 13 still active and eight having received All-Pro honors.

1981 College Football All-America Team

The 1981 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1981. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1981 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) based on the input of more than 2,000 voting members; (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), Gannett News Service (GNS), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).Nine players were unanimously selected as first-team All-Americans by all four official selectors. They were:

Marcus Allen, running back for USC, who won the 1981 Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, and Walter Camp Award after becoming the first player to rush for more than 2,000 yards (2,427) in a season;

Anthony Carter, wider receiver for Michigan, consensus first-team All-American in both 1981 and 1982 who caught 50 passes for 952 yards during the 1981 season;

Sean Farrell, offensive guard who helped lead Penn State to a 10–2 record and a #3 ranking in the final AP Poll;

Jim McMahon, quarterback for BYU and winner of the 1981 Davey O'Brien Award and Sammy Baugh Trophy;

Dave Rimington, center for Nebraska, two-time winner of the Outland Trophy and the namesake of the Rimington Trophy, which is awarded annually to the nation's top collegiate center.

Kenneth Sims, defensive tackle who helped lead Texas to a 10–1–1 record and #2 ranking in the final AP Poll, and who became the #1 pick in the 1982 NFL Draft;

Billy Ray Smith, Jr., defensive end for Arkansas and who was a consensus first-team All-American in both 1981 and 1982;

Herschel Walker, running back for Georgia, a three-time consensus first-team All-American who finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1981 and won the award in 1982; and

Tim Wrightman, tight end for UCLA who caught 28 passes for 308 yards in 1981.Allen, Carter, McMahon, Rimington, Smith, and Walker have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

The 1981 Michigan Wolverines football team led the nation with five of its players, all on offense, receiving first-team honors from one or more of the selectors. In addition to Anthony Carter, Michigan's honorees were offensive tackles Ed Muransky and Bubba Paris, offensive guard Kurt Becker, and running back Butch Woolfolk.

1981 USC Trojans football team

The 1981 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1981 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their sixth year under head coach John Robinson, the Trojans compiled a 9–3 record (5–2 against conference opponents), finished in a tie for second place in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10), and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 284 to 170.Quarterback John Mazur led the team in passing, completing 93 of 194 passes for 1,128 yards with seven touchdowns and five interceptions. Marcus Allen led the team in rushing with 433 carries for 2,427 yards and 22 touchdowns. Jeff Simmons led the team in receiving yards with 28 catches for 543 yards and one touchdown. Allen became the first player in NCAA history to rush for over 2,000 yards in one season. He also gained a total of 2,683 offensive yards, led the nation in scoring, and won the Heisman Trophy, the Maxwell Award, and Walter Camp Award and was also the Pac-10 player of the year.

Anthony Thompson (American football)

Anthony Q. Thompson (born April 8, 1967) is a former professional American football running back and a current pastor at the Lighthouse Community Church in Bloomington, Indiana.

Baker Mayfield

Baker Reagan Mayfield (born April 14, 1995) is an American football quarterback for the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League (NFL).

Mayfield began his college football career as a walk-on player for the Texas Tech Red Raiders. He is notable for being the first walk-on true freshman quarterback to start a season opener at a BCS school. Mayfield transferred from Texas Tech to Oklahoma following alleged scholarship issues and a lack of communication with coaches. After sitting out the 2014 season due to NCAA transfer rules, Mayfield won the starting quarterback job in 2015. He won several awards for his performance as a senior in 2017, including the Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award, and unanimous All-America recognition.

Mayfield was drafted by the Browns first overall in the 2018 NFL Draft. In his first NFL appearance, Mayfield led Cleveland to their first win in 19 games, ending a 635 day winless streak. He threw 27 touchdowns in his 13 starts for the Browns in 2018, breaking the rookie-season passing-TD record previously held by Peyton Manning and Russell Wilson.

Charles White (American football)

Charles Raymond White (born January 22, 1958) is a former professional American football player who was a running back in the National Football League (NFL) for nine seasons during the 1980s.

He played college football for the University of Southern California, where he was an All-American and the winner of the Heisman Trophy. A first-round pick (27th overall) in the 1980 NFL Draft, he played professionally for the Cleveland Browns and the Los Angeles Rams of the NFL.

Derrick Henry

Derrick Lamar Henry Jr. (born January 4, 1994) is an American football running back for the Tennessee Titans of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the Alabama Crimson Tide, and was drafted in the second round of the 2016 NFL draft by the Titans. In December 2015, he broke Herschel Walker's single-season college rushing yards record in the SEC. He won the 2015 Heisman Trophy, as well as the Doak Walker Award, the Maxwell Award, and the Walter Camp Award. Henry holds the national high school football record for career rushing yards.

Heisman Trophy

The Heisman Memorial Trophy (usually known colloquially as the Heisman Trophy or The Heisman), is awarded annually to a player in NCAA football. Winners epitomize great ability combined with diligence, perseverance, and hard work. It is presented by the Heisman Trophy Trust in early December before the postseason bowl games.

The award was created by the Downtown Athletic Club in 1935 to recognize "the most valuable college football player east of the Mississippi," and was first awarded to University of Chicago halfback Jay Berwanger. After the death in October 1936 of the Club's athletic director, John Heisman, the award was named in his honor and broadened to include players west of the Mississippi. Heisman had been active in college athletics as a football player; a head football, basketball, and baseball coach; and an athletic director. It is the oldest of several overall awards in college football, including the Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award, and the AP Player of the Year. The Heisman and the AP Player of the Year honor the most outstanding player, while the Maxwell and the Walter Camp award recognizes the best player, and the Archie Griffin Award recognizes the most valuable player. The most recent winner of the Heisman Trophy is former University of Oklahoma quarterback Kyler Murray.

Ken MacAfee

Kenneth Adams MacAfee, Jr. (born January 9, 1956), is a former professional American football player. He played collegiately at the University of Notre Dame and professionally for the San Francisco 49ers.

Lamar Jackson

Lamar Demeatrice Jackson Jr. (born January 7, 1997) is an American football quarterback for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Louisville and was selected 32nd overall by the Ravens in the first round of the 2018 NFL Draft. At Louisville, Jackson won the Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, and Walter Camp Award and was a unanimous All-American as a sophomore in 2016.

Maxwell Award

The Maxwell Award is presented annually to the college football player judged by a panel of sportscasters, sportswriters, and National Collegiate Athletic Association head coaches and the membership of the Maxwell Football Club to be the best all-around in the United States. The award is named after Robert "Tiny" Maxwell, a Swarthmore College football player, coach and sportswriter. Johnny Lattner (1952, 1953) and Tim Tebow (2007, 2008) are the only players to have won the award twice. It is the college equivalent of the Bert Bell Award of the National Football League, also given out by the Maxwell Club.

Pat Sullivan (American football)

Patrick Joseph Sullivan (born January 18, 1950) is a former American football player and coach. An All-American quarterback for the Auburn Tigers, he won the Heisman Trophy in 1971 and then played six seasons in the National Football League (NFL) with the Atlanta Falcons and Washington Redskins. Sullivan was a head football coach at Samford University, a position he held from 2007 to 2014. He was previously the head football coach at Texas Christian University (TCU) from 1992 to 1997 and the offensive coordinator at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) from 1999 to 2006. Sullivan was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1991.

Rashaan Salaam

Rashaan Iman Salaam (October 8, 1974 – December 5, 2016) was an American college and professional football player who was a running back in the National Football League (NFL) for four seasons during the 1990s. Salaam played college football for the University of Colorado and won the 1994 Heisman Trophy. He was picked by the Chicago Bears in the first round of the 1995 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the Bears and Cleveland Browns of the NFL. Salaam died by suicide on December 5, 2016.

Sporting News College Football Player of the Year

The Sporting News College Football Player of the Year award is given to the player of the year in college football as adjudged by Sporting News.

Tua Tagovailoa

Tuanigamanuolepola "Tua" Tagovailoa (TOO-ah TUNG-oh-VAI-loa; born March 2, 1998) is an American football quarterback for the Alabama Crimson Tide. He was born and raised in Hawaii.

UPI College Football Player of the Year

The United Press International College Football Player of the Year Award was among the first and most recognized college football awards. With the second bankruptcy of UPI in 1991, along with that of its parent company, the award was discontinued. Offensive and defensive players were eligible. Unlike the Heisman, it was never affiliated with a civic organization or named after a player (like the Walter Camp Award). Like all UPI college awards at the time, it was based on the votes of NCAA coaches. Billy Cannon, O.J. Simpson, and Archie Griffin are the only two-time winners.

Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award

The Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award is given annually to the collegiate American football head coach adjudged by a group of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) head coaches and sports information directors under the auspices of the Walter Camp Football Foundation as the "Coach of the Year"; the award is named for Walter Camp, a progenitor of the sport. The foundation also honors a Walter Camp Man of the Year for service.

The award has been presented yearly since 1967 during the Walter Camp Football Foundation's annual awards weekend, held on the campus of Yale University.

Walter Camp Award winners
Overall trophies
Overall media awards
Positional awards
Other national player awards
All-Americans
Head coaching awards
Assistant coaching awards
Conference awards
Division I FCS awards
Other divisions/associations
Academic, inspirational,
and versatility awards
Service awards
Regional awards
Awards organizations
Halls of fame

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