Walt Wilmot

Walter Robert Wilmot (October 18, 1863 – February 1, 1929) was a professional baseball player. He played all or part of 10 seasons in Major League Baseball with the Washington Nationals (1888–89), Chicago Colts (1890-95) and New York Giants (1897–98), primarily as an outfielder. Listed at 5 ft 9 in, 165 lb., Wilmot was a switch-hitter and threw right-handed. He was born in Plover, Wisconsin.

While playing for the Nationals in 1889, Wilmot led the league with 19 triples and 139 games played. The following season, he tied with Oyster Burns and Mike Tiernan for the National League lead in home runs with 13, also a career-high. He also set a career best with 76 stolen bases while driving in 99 runs in 1890. On August 22, 1891, he became the first player in major league history to be walked 6 times in 1 game.[1]

Walter R. Wilmot
Wilmot from 1901 newspaper story

Wilmot's most productive season came in 1894, when he posted career-highs in batting average (.330), runs scored (134), hits (197), RBI (130), doubles (45) and extra-base hits (62) in 133 games.

Overall in his ten-season career, Wilmot was a .276 hitter with 58 home runs and 594 RBI in 962 games, including 727 runs, 152 doubles, 92 triples, 381 stolen bases and a .337 on-base percentage.

Wilmot died in Chicago, at the age of 65.

Walt Wilmot
Walt Wilmot
Outfielder
Born: October 18, 1865
Plover, Wisconsin
Died: February 1, 1929 (aged 65)
Chicago, Illinois
Batted: Switch Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 20, 1888, for the Washington Nationals
Last MLB appearance
June 14, 1898, for the New York Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average.276
Home runs58
Runs batted in594
Stolen bases381
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ Solomon, Abbot Neil, "Baseball Records Illustrated", Quintet Publishing, London, 1988

External links

1888 Washington Nationals season

The 1888 Washington Nationals finished with a 48–86 record in the National League, finishing in last place.

1889 Washington Nationals season

The 1889 Washington Nationals finished with a 41–83 record in the National League, finishing in last place. The team folded at the conclusion of the season.

1890 Chicago Colts season

The 1890 Chicago Colts season was the 19th season of the Chicago Colts franchise, the 15th in the National League and the 6th at the first West Side Park. The Colts finished second in the National League with a record of 83–53.

1890 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1890 throughout the world.

1891 Chicago Colts season

The 1891 Chicago Colts season was the 20th season of the Chicago Colts franchise, the 16th in the National League and the 1st at South Side Park. The Colts finished second in the National League with a record of 82–53.

1892 Chicago Colts season

The 1892 Chicago Colts season was the 21st season of the Chicago Colts franchise, the 17th in the National League and the 2nd at South Side Park. The Colts finished seventh in the National League with a record of 70–76.

1893 Chicago Colts season

The 1893 Chicago Colts season was the 22nd season of the Chicago Colts franchise, the 18th in the National League and the 1st at West Side Park. The Colts finished ninth in the National League with a record of 56–71.

1894 Chicago Colts season

The 1894 Chicago Colts season was the 23rd season of the Chicago Colts franchise, the 19th in the National League and the 2nd at West Side Park. The Colts finished eighth in the National League with a record of 57–75.

1895 Chicago Colts season

The 1895 Chicago Colts season was the 24th season of the Chicago Colts franchise, the 20th in the National League and the 3rd at West Side Park. The Colts finished fourth in the National League with a record of 72–58.

1897 New York Giants season

The 1897 New York Giants season was the franchise's 15th season. The team finished in third place in the National League with an 83-48 record, 9.5 games behind the Boston Beaneaters.

1898 New York Giants season

The 1898 New York Giants season was the franchise's 16th season. The team finished in seventh place in the National League with a 77-73 record, 25.5 games behind the Boston Beaneaters.

Algie McBride

Algernon Griggs "Algie" McBride (May 23, 1869 – January 10, 1956), was an American professional baseball player in the late 19th and early 20th century. Born in Washington, D.C. in 1869, he played as an outfielder for five seasons in Major League Baseball, beginning with the Chicago Colts in 1896, played with the Cincinnati Reds from 1898 until 1901, and then finished the 1901 season with the New York Giants.

List of Chicago Cubs team records

The following lists statistical records and all-time leaders as well as awards and major accomplishments for the Chicago Cubs professional baseball club of Major League Baseball. The records list the top 5 players in each category since the inception of the Cubs.

Players that are still active with the Cubs are denoted in bold.

Records updated as of August 5, 2011.

List of Major League Baseball annual triples leaders

In baseball, a triple is recorded when the ball is hit so that the batter is able to advance all the way to third base, scoring any runners who were already on base, with no errors by the defensive team on the play. In Major League Baseball (MLB), a player in each league is recognized for leading the league in triples. Only triples hit in a particular league count toward that league's seasonal lead.

The first triples champion in the National League was Ross Barnes; in the league's inaugural 1876 season, Barnes hit fourteen triples for the Chicago White Stockings. In 1901, the American League was established and led by two members of the Baltimore Orioles: Bill Keister and Jimmy Williams each had 21.

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as an outfielder leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

An outfielder is a person playing in one of the three defensive positions in baseball, farthest from the batter. These defenders are the left fielder, the center fielder, and the right fielder. An outfielder's duty is to try to catch long fly balls before they hit the ground or to quickly catch or retrieve and return to the infield any other balls entering the outfield. Outfielders normally play behind the six other members of the defense who play in or near the infield. By convention, each of the nine defensive positions in baseball is numbered. The outfield positions are 7 (left field), 8 (center field) and 9 (right field). These numbers are shorthand designations useful in baseball scorekeeping and are not necessarily the same as the squad numbers worn on player uniforms.

Tom Brown is the all-time leader in errors committed by an outfielder with 492 career. Brown is the only outfielder to commit more than 400 career errors. Dummy Hoy (394), Paul Hines (385), Jesse Burkett (383), George Gore (368), Jimmy Ryan (366), George Van Haltren (358), and Ned Hanlon (350) are the only other outfielders to commit more than 300 career errors.

List of Major League Baseball career stolen bases leaders

In baseball statistics, a stolen base is credited to a baserunner when he successfully advances to the next base while the pitcher is throwing the ball to home plate. Under Rule 7.01 of Major League Baseball's (MLB) Official Rules, a runner acquires the right to an unoccupied base when he touches it before he is out. Stolen bases were more common in baseball's dead-ball era, when teams relied more on stolen bases and hit and run plays than on home runs.As of September 2018, Rickey Henderson holds the MLB career stolen base record with 1,406. He is the only MLB player to have reached the 1,000 stolen bases milestone in his career. Following Henderson is Lou Brock with 938 stolen bases; Billy Hamilton is third on the all-time steals listing. His number of career steals varies with different sources, but all sources hold his career steals placing him in third on the list before Ty Cobb (897), Tim Raines (808), Vince Coleman (752), Arlie Latham (742), Eddie Collins (741), Max Carey (738), and Honus Wagner (723), who are the only other players to have stolen at least 700 bases. Coleman is the leader for retired players that are not members of the Hall of Fame. Hugh Nicol is the leader for the most stolen bases in one season, with 138 stolen bases in 1887.Brock held the all-time career stolen bases before being surpassed by Henderson in 1991. Brock had held the record from 1977 to 1991. Before Brock, Hamilton held the record for eighty-one years, from 1897 to 1977. Before that, Latham held the record from 1887 to 1896. Latham was also the first player to collect 300 career stolen bases. With Kenny Lofton's retirement in 2007, 2008 was the first season since 1967 in which no active player had more than 500 career stolen bases. Between 2008 and 2010, no active player had more than 500 stolen bases until Juan Pierre collected his 500th stolen base on August 5, 2010. He was the leader in stolen bases for active players until his retirement at the end of the 2013 season. José Reyes is the current active leader in stolen bases with 517 career.

Luis Castillo (second baseman)

Luis Antonio Castillo (born September 12, 1975) is a former Major League Baseball second baseman. Castillo is a three-time All-Star, three-time Gold Glove winner, and won the World Series with the Florida Marlins in 2003. He is also the only player who played for the Marlins in both of their World Series winning seasons who did not get traded in between the two seasons.

Plover, Wisconsin

Plover is a village in Portage County, Wisconsin, United States. A suburb of Stevens Point, it is part of the Stevens Point Micropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 12,123 at the 2010 census.

Washington Nationals (1886–1889) all-time roster

The following is a list of players and who appeared in at least one game for the fourth of five Washington Nationals franchises of Major League Baseball, which played in the National League from 1886 until 1889. Players in bold are in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

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