Walt Weiss

Walter William Weiss (born November 28, 1963) is an American former professional baseball shortstop and manager and coach for the Atlanta Braves. He played in Major League Baseball from 1987 through 2000 for the Oakland Athletics, Florida Marlins, Colorado Rockies, and Atlanta Braves. He managed the Rockies from 2013 through 2016.

Weiss was a member of the 1998 National League All-Star Team. He also won the 1988 Rookie of the Year award.[1]

Walt Weiss
Walt Weiss 2013
Weiss as manager of the Colorado Rockies in 2013
Atlanta Braves – No. 4
Shortstop / Manager / Bench coach
Born: November 28, 1963 (age 55)
Tuxedo, New York
Batted: Switch Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 12, 1987, for the Oakland Athletics
Last MLB appearance
October 1, 2000, for the Atlanta Braves
MLB statistics
Batting average.258
Home runs25
Runs batted in386
Managerial record283–365
Winning %.437
Teams
As player

As manager

As coach

Career highlights and awards

Early career

Initially drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in the 10th round of the 1982 amateur draft, Weiss decided to put his professional baseball career on hold and attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In June 1985, he was the 12th overall pick in the 1985 draft.

At the age of 23, he made his first major league appearance for the Oakland Athletics in September 1987. The club was impressed enough with the young shortstop's talent that they traded starter Alfredo Griffin that December, making him their starting shortstop for 1988. His offensive numbers were low (.250 average, three home runs, 39 RBIs and 44 runs scored), but his defensive wizardry helped lead the A's to their first American League pennant since 1974. The 1988 World Series was a rematch of the 1974 matchup, with the Los Angeles Dodgers winning the National League pennant. His costly error in Game 4 helped the Dodgers win the Series in five games, but he was voted American League Rookie of the Year for 1988 as the third consecutive Oakland player to win the award after sluggers José Canseco in 1986 and Mark McGwire in 1987. He also made the 1988 Topps All-Star Rookie Roster.

Mid-career

Walt Weiss 1989
Weiss with the A's in 1989

In 1989 Weiss's offensive numbers didn't improve as he battled through injury and adversity even though the A's repeated as AL pennant winners, meeting their crosstown rival San Francisco Giants in the 1989 World Series. Although the Series would be overshadowed by the Loma Prieta earthquake on October 17 which delayed play for ten days, Weiss homered and the A's swept the Giants to claim their first world title in fifteen years.

1990 saw Weiss put up his best offensive numbers to date in hits, runs and batting average, while also stealing nine bases. The A's won their third straight pennant, but Weiss was injured in the 1990 American League Championship Series against the Boston Red Sox and missed Oakland's 1990 World Series loss to the Cincinnati Reds, four games to none.

Limited by prior injuries, he didn't play much in 1991 as the A's missed the playoffs for the first time since 1987. In what would be his final year in Oakland, he hit .212 in 1992 and was traded to the new NL expansion Florida Marlins during the offseason.[2]

He played in 158 games in 1993 for the Marlins, but after the season became a free agent, chose to sign with the Colorado Rockies (which like the Marlins were a new NL expansion team in 1993) and was the first player to play for both of these 1993 expansion teams. Weiss spent four modestly successful years with the bat in Colorado, posting career highs in home runs (8) and RBIs (48); but his strengths lay in solid defensive play at shortstop and ability to reach base (.351 lifetime OBP).

Later career

In December 1997, he signed[3] with the Atlanta Braves and became their starting shortstop, hitting .280 and making the All-Star team[4] for the only time in his career in 1998. The Braves finished with 106 wins but lost the NL pennant to the San Diego Padres, but he was slowed by injuries and appeared in less than a hundred games for the first time since 1991. The next season, his decline continued with a disappointing .226 batting average.

While with the Braves, Weiss' family had a health scare when his 3-year old son contracted E. Coli from an Atlanta water amusement park which caused his kidneys to shut down. Weiss' son made a full recovery.[5]

In Game 3 of the 1999 NLDS against the Houston Astros, however, he made a stunning defensive play to save the season. In the bottom of the tenth, with the bases loaded, one out and the score tied, Tony Eusebio hit a sharp grounder up the middle. Weiss ranged hard to his left, fell on his stomach and threw to home for the force. After the game, he said the ball nearly ripped the glove off his hand. Weiss and the Braves went on to win the game, and with it the division series, on their way to the NL pennant and the 1999 World Series, which they lost to the New York Yankees.

In 2000, he only had 192 at-bats, mostly due to losing the starting shortstop job to the emergent Rafael Furcal, who would go on to win Rookie of the Year just like Weiss twelve years prior. He retired after the season.

Post-playing career

Weiss's charitable contributions have included numerous donations to Watertown High School in Watertown, New York. In addition, the baseball field at his alma mater, Suffern High School, is named after him.

After retiring from the Braves as a player following the 2000 season, he returned to the Rockies as a special instructor and adviser to the front office from 2002 to 2008. He left that job to spend more time with his family, and coach his sons' baseball and football teams.[6]

Weiss was signed on November 7, 2012, to be the manager of the Colorado Rockies.[7] Weiss made the decision to step down as the manager of the Colorado Rockies after four managerial seasons with the club on October 3, 2016.[8] He finished with a record of 283 wins and 365 losses.[9] The Braves announced that Weiss had been hired as bench coach on November 10, 2017.[10]

Managerial record

As of games played on October 2, 2016
Team From To Regular season record[9] Post–season record[9]
W L Win % W L Win %
Colorado Rockies 2013 2016 283 365 .437

See also

References

  1. ^ Weiss is AL rookie of the year
  2. ^ A's deal Weiss to Marlins
  3. ^ Free agent Weiss signs with Braves
  4. ^ Braves have two All-Star infielders
  5. ^ https://about-ecoli.com/ecoli_outbreaks/news/weiss-cant-just-forget-e-coli-scare
  6. ^ Johnston, Joey (March 17, 2018). "Weiss brings wealth of experience to Braves". MLB.com. Retrieved March 18, 2018.
  7. ^ Renck, Troy E. (November 7, 2012). "Walt Weiss named Colorado Rockies manager, taking over for Jim Tracy". Denver Post. Retrieved March 18, 2018.
  8. ^ "Walt Weiss out as Colorado Rockies manager". USA Today. October 4, 2016. Retrieved March 18, 2018.
  9. ^ a b c "Walt Weiss". Baseball reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 4, 2016.
  10. ^ Bowman, Mark (November 10, 2017). "Former Rox manager Weiss joins Braves' staff". MLB.com. Retrieved November 12, 2017.

External links

Preceded by
Al Pedrique
Topps Rookie All-Star Shortstop
1988
Succeeded by
Gary Sheffield
1985 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1985 season involved the A's finishing 4th in the American League West with a record of 77 wins and 85 losses. While the Athletics' on-field performance continued to disappoint, the debut of slugger Jose Canseco gave fans a measure of hope.

1988 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1988 season involved the A's winning their first American League West title since 1981, with a record of 104 wins and 58 losses. In 1988, the elephant was restored as the symbol of the Athletics and currently adorns the left sleeve of home and road uniforms. The elephant was retired as team mascot in 1963 by then-owner Charles O. Finley in favor of a Missouri mule. The A's defeated the Boston Red Sox in the ALCS, but lost the World Series to the Los Angeles Dodgers in five games, including a dramatic, classic walk-off home run by the Dodgers' Kirk Gibson in game one.

1988 was the first of 3 straight years the A's would represent the AL in the World Series.

1990 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1990 season was their 23rd in Oakland, California. It was also the 90th season in franchise history. The team finished first in the American League West with a record of 103-59.

The Athletics' 1990 campaign ranks among the organization's finest. Oakland, in winning 103 games, led the league outright in wins for a third consecutive season; they remained the last major North American team to accomplish this until 2017, when the feat was matched by the nearby Golden State Warriors of the NBA. The Athletics benefited from stellar performances in all areas of the game. The team's offense was led by eventual Hall-of-Famer Rickey Henderson. Henderson finished the season with 65 stolen bases, 28 home runs, and a .325 batting average; for his efforts, he took home the 1990 American League MVP Award. The Athletics also benefited from strong performances by superstars Mark McGwire and Jose Canseco. The pair clubbed 39 and 37 home runs, respectively; in doing so, they drove in a combined total of 209 runs. Over the course of the season, the team added to an already strong offense; the additions of recent All-Stars Willie Randolph, Willie McGee, and Harold Baines further widened the gap between the Athletics and the rest of the league. Established veterans (such as Carney Lansford, Terry Steinbach, Dave Henderson, and Mike Gallego) and promising young players (mainly Walt Weiss and Mike Bordick) rounded out arguably the deepest roster in all of Major League Baseball. Eight of the Athletics' nine main postseason starters (R. Henderson, McGwire, Canseco, McGee, Steinbach, Randolph, Baines, and Lansford) played in at least one All-Star Game between 1988 and 1990.

The Athletics pitching staff, in many regards, had an even stronger campaign. The starting rotation was led by veteran Bob Welch. Welch would finish the season with both an MLB-leading 27 wins and a 2.95 ERA; this performance was strong enough to net the 1990 Cy Young Award. Welch, as of 2014, remains the last MLB pitcher to win at least 25 games in a season. Fellow starter Dave Stewart, winner of 22 games, finished in a tie (with Pittsburgh starter Doug Drabek) for the second-most wins in MLB. 1989 All-Star Mike Moore, 1991 All-Star Scott Sanderson, and longtime Athletic Curt Young rounded out the American League's top rotation. The Athletics' bullpen was led by superstar closer Dennis Eckersley, who posted a microscopic 0.61 ERA while recording 48 saves. As a team, the Athletics allowed only 570 runs (the fewest in the American League by a wide margin).

The Athletics easily won the American League West for a third consecutive season. They swept the Boston Red Sox, four games to none, in that year's American League Championship Series; in doing so, they won a third consecutive American League pennant. The Athletics entered the 1990 World Series as heavy favorites. Despite this, however, they were themselves swept by the Cincinnati Reds. The Athletics have not reached the World Series since.

1993 Florida Marlins season

The 1993 Florida Marlins season was the inaugural year for the team, part of the 1993 Major League Baseball expansion. Their manager was Rene Lachemann. They played home games at Joe Robbie Stadium. They finished 33 games behind the NL Champion Philadelphia Phillies, with a record of 64-98, sixth in the National League East, ahead of only the New York Mets.

1993 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1993 season was the team's 26th in Oakland, California. It was also the 93rd season in franchise history. The team finished seventh in the American League West with a record of 68-94.

The Athletics' disastrous 1993 campaign was mired by inconsistency, injuries, and free agent losses. The team lost key contributors Dave Stewart, Harold Baines, and Mike Moore to free agency; the players ended up (respectively) in Toronto, Chicago, and Detroit. The A's also traded Walt Weiss to the expansion Florida Marlins for Scott Baker and Eric Hefland. The Athletics' roster was further weakened by the retirement of longtime third baseman Carney Lansford.

The team's depleted pitching staff was no match for its American League (AL) competition. The Athletics, following a resurgent 1992 campaign, finished 1993 with a team ERA of 4.90; this was the worst such figure in the AL. The futility of Oakland's new-look starting rotation was especially noteworthy; of the team's five primary starters (Bobby Witt, Ron Darling, Bob Welch, Todd Van Poppel, and Shawn Hillegas), only one (Witt) managed a sub-5.00 ERA. On offense, the Athletics also struggled; the loss of their two best players (Mark McGwire and Rickey Henderson) to injury and a trade, respectively, contributed to their scoring only 715 runs (10th of 14 AL teams).

The Athletics' 68-94 finish was their worst since 1982. Moreover, the 1993 Athletics (as of 2018) remain the only team in Oakland history to finish last in the AL West after finishing first one-year earlier.

1994 Colorado Rockies season

The Colorado Rockies' 1994 season was the second for the Rockies. They tried to win the National League West. Don Baylor was their manager. They played home games at Mile High Stadium.They finished with a record of 53-64, 3rd in the division. The season was cut short by a player strike.

1998 Atlanta Braves season

The 1998 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 33rd season in Atlanta and 128th overall. They went on to win their seventh consecutive division title, taking the National League East title by 18 games over the second place New York Mets.

The team featured six all stars: shortstop Walt Weiss and third baseman Chipper Jones were voted as starters, while first baseman Andrés Galarraga, catcher Javy López, and pitchers Tom Glavine and Greg Maddux were selected as reserves. Jones and Lopez each hit over 30 home runs as Galaragga (acquired from Colorado) led the club in home runs and RBI. Galaragga finished as an MVP candidate.

The 1998 Braves beat the Chicago Cubs three games to none in the National League Division Series. In the next round Atlanta then lost to the San Diego Padres in the National League Championship Series four games to two. Despite winning two games after losing the first three, Atlanta's comeback bid came short by being eliminated in game 6. San Diego's winning over Atlanta was seen as one of the biggest upsets in postseason history.

This team has earned a few historic accolades. ESPN writer David Schoenfield lists them as one of the top teams in MLB history to not win a World SeriesESPN columnist Jeff Merron also writes that the pitching staff of Maddux, Glavine, John Smoltz, Denny Neagle, and Kevin Millwood was the greatest of all time. The quintet posted a cumulative 2.97 ERA and amassed 88 wins (almost 18 wins per starter), equaling the win total of the 2nd place Mets. The 1998 Braves are the only team in MLB history to have five pitchers each strike out 150 batters in the same season. Glavine, the lone 20 game winner in the National League for that year, won the Cy Young Award.

1998 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1998 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 69th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 7, 1998, at Coors Field in Denver, Colorado, the home of the Colorado Rockies of the National League. The first All-Star contest played in the Mountain Time Zone, the game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 13-8. It remains the highest-scoring All-Star Game in MLB history. Also, it was the last MLB All Star Game not to be held on the 2nd or 3rd Tuesday of July, it was held on the 1st Tuesday of July, and thus the earliest ASG held since then.

The pregame ceremony honored the United States Air Force Academy who provided the five-man color guard, flag presentations, and, at the end of country music singer Faith Hill's performance of the U.S. National Anthem, the flyover ceremonies. Hill's National Anthem performance was preceded by actress Gloria Reuben's performance of The Canadian National Anthem.

Twelve-year-old Elias Kurts was given the honor of throwing out the ceremonial first pitch, the first "non-celebrity" so honored.

1998 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1998 season saw the A's finish with a record of 74 wins and 88 losses. The campaign was the first of the Billy Beane era. While the Athletics finished a distant fourth in the AL West, they improved upon the prior year's dismal output of 65-97.

The strong play of Jason Giambi, Matt Stairs and Kenny Rogers highlighted an otherwise forgettable campaign. Rogers' performance was particularly impressive; in arguably the finest season of his career, he won 16 games and posted a 3.17 earned run average (both were the best full-season marks by an Athletics starter since 1992). Additionally, the 1998 season marked Rickey Henderson's fourth (and final) stint with the Athletics. Henderson, at the age of 39, stole a total 66 bases; this total lead the league in that category. Lastly, rookie Ben Grieve collected a Rookie of the Year (ROY) award for his solid debut season. The award was the Athletics' first since Walt Weiss received one in 1988.

The Athletics posted a winning record in 1999. The organization, under Beane, would not post another losing season until 2007.

1999 Atlanta Braves season

The 1999 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 34th season in Atlanta and 129th overall. The Braves won their eighth consecutive division title with a 103-59 record and 6 game lead over the New York Mets. The Braves appeared in the World Series for the fifth time during the 1990s. The Braves lost all four games of the 1999 World Series to the New York Yankees, resulting in a sweep. The Braves played their 2nd World Series against the Yankees in 4 years, with the first being in 1996, which they played in six games. This is to date their last National League pennant.

Two key players on the 1999 Braves were Chipper Jones & John Rocker. Jones won the National League's Most Valuable Player award with a .310 average, 45 HRs, 110 RBIs, and sealed the award with his September heroics against the New York Mets. Rocker recorded 38 saves as Atlanta's closer, but later created controversy due to his racist and homophobic comments in a December 27, 1999, Sports Illustrated article.

2013 Colorado Rockies season

The 2013 Colorado Rockies season was the franchise's 21st in Major League Baseball. The season marked the Rockies' 18th season of playing their home games at Coors Field. It was Todd Helton's 17th and final season with the Rockies and Walt Weiss first season as Manager.

2014 Colorado Rockies season

The 2014 Colorado Rockies season was the franchise's 22nd in Major League Baseball. Beset by injuries to key players, they finished 66–96, in fourth place in the Western Division. Walt Weiss returned for his second season as the Manager for the 2014 season

2015 Colorado Rockies season

The 2015 Colorado Rockies season was the franchise's 23rd in Major League Baseball. Walt Weiss returned for his third consecutive season as the Manager. It was the 21st season the Rockies played their home games at Coors Field.

2016 Colorado Rockies season

The 2016 Colorado Rockies season was the franchise's 24th in Major League Baseball. It was the 22nd season the Rockies played their home games at Coors Field. After doing reasonably well most of the season and even posting a 54-53 (.505) record as late as August 3, they collapsed through the months of August and September, going an MLB-worst 21-34 in that span to finish 75-87, third place in the National League West, and missing the playoffs for the seventh consecutive season. At the end of the season Walt Weiss resigned his position as manager after 4 seasons at the helm.

Bobby Crosby

Robert Edward Crosby (born January 12, 1980) is a former infielder in Major League Baseball. The son of former major league infielder Ed Crosby, he batted and threw right-handed. He was Rookie of the Year in 2004.

Coors Field

Coors Field is a baseball park located in downtown Denver, Colorado. It is the home field of the Colorado Rockies, the city's Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise. Opened in 1995, the park is located in Denver's Lower Downtown neighborhood, two blocks from Union Station. It is named for the Coors Brewing Company of Golden, Colorado, which purchased the naming rights to the venue.

Beginning play in 1993, the Rockies spent their first two seasons at Mile High Stadium. During that time, Coors Field was constructed for a cost of $300 million. It includes 63 luxury suites and 4,526 club seats. Coors Field has earned a reputation as a hitter's park, due to the effect of Denver's high elevation and semi-arid climate on the distances of batted balls. To combat this, the outfield fences were positioned further away from home plate and baseballs used in the park have been pre-stored in humidors.

Coors Field has hosted the 1998 MLB All-Star Game, an outdoor hockey game from the 2016 NHL Stadium Series, and numerous concerts.

List of Colorado Rockies managers

The Colorado Rockies are members of Major League Baseball (MLB) and based in Denver, Colorado. The Rockies have had seven managers since their founding in 1993. The Rockies first manager was Don Baylor, who led the team for six seasons and qualified for the playoffs once. Former manager Clint Hurdle led the franchise in wins and losses; Hurdle led the Rockies to the playoffs in 2007 in which the franchise was defeated in the World Series.

List of Oakland Athletics first-round draft picks

The Oakland Athletics (the A's) are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Oakland, California. They play in the American League West division. The Athletics had played in Philadelphia from 1901 to 1954 and then Kansas City from 1955 to 1967 before moving to Oakland. Since the establishment of the Rule 4 Draft the Athletics have selected 77 players in the first round. Officially known as the "First-Year Player Draft", the Rule 4 Draft is MLB's primary mechanism for assigning players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur clubs to its franchises. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings, with the team possessing the worst record receiving the first pick. In addition, teams which lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded compensatory or supplementary picks.Of these 80 players, 36 have been pitchers, the most of any position; 27 of these were right-handed, while 9 were left-handed. Fifteen outfielders, including one center fielder, and 13 shortstops were selected. The A's have also drafted six catchers, five third basemen, four first basemen, and one second baseman in the first round. Additionally, 23 players came from high schools or universities in the A's home state of California, followed by 10 from Texas and Florida. They also drafted Ariel Prieto in 1995, who had defected from Cuba the year before. Prieto made his major league debut in 1995, one of 20 players in draft history to go directly to the majors without playing in the minor leagues.Three Athletics' first-round picks have won championships with the franchise. Reggie Jackson (1966) won World Series titles with the team in 1972, 1973, and 1974. Mark McGwire (1984) and Walt Weiss (1985) won with the 1989 championship team. Four A's first-round picks have gone on to win the Rookie of the Year Award: McGwire in 1987, Weiss in 1988, Ben Grieve (1994) in 1998, and Huston Street (2004) in 2005. Jackson also won a Most Valuable Player award in 1973, and Barry Zito (1999) won a Cy Young Award in 2002, making them the A's only picks to win these awards. Reggie Jackson, elected in 1993, is their only pick in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Although eligible McGwire has not been elected despite over 500 career home runs and briefly holding the single-season home run record (70). Some see McGwire's exclusion as a sign that the Hall is hesitant to elect players suspected of using performance-enhancing drugs as McGwire was suspected of steroid use (he later admitted his use in 2010). The Athletics have made nineteen selections in the supplemental round of the draft and have made the first overall selection once: in the first draft in 1965.The Athletics have failed to sign three first-round draft picks, although they did not receive a compensation pick for any of them. The first such player not signed was Pete Broberg in 1968. The A's also failed to sign both of their draft picks in 1979, Juan Bustabad and Mike Stenhouse. The Athletics have had ten compensatory picks overall since the first draft in 1965. These additional picks are provided when a team loses a particularly valuable free agent in the previous off-season, or, more recently, if a team fails to sign a draft pick from the previous year.

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