Wally Moses

Wallace Moses (October 8, 1910 – October 10, 1990) was an American professional baseball right fielder, who played Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Athletics (1935–41; 1949–51), Chicago White Sox (1942–46), and Boston Red Sox (1946–48). Moses batted and threw left-handed. He was born in Uvalda, Georgia.

Wally Moses
Wally Moses 1951
Moses later in his career with Philadelphia.
Right fielder
Born: October 8, 1910
Uvalda, Georgia
Died: October 10, 1990 (aged 80)
Vidalia, Georgia
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 17, 1935, for the Philadelphia Athletics
Last MLB appearance
September 30, 1951, for the Philadelphia Athletics
MLB statistics
Batting average.291
Home runs89
Runs batted in679
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Baseball career

Moses started his professional career with Galveston of the Texas League, where he batted .316 in 1934.[1] He debuted with the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1935 season. He batted over .300 each of his seven years with them, with a career-best .345 in his sophomore year.

Moses had by far his most productive season in 1937, when he hit career-highs in home runs (25), RBI (86), runs (113), hits (208) and doubles (48), batting .320 with 13 triples. In 1939, he missed a World Series opportunity when his trade to the Detroit Tigers for Benny McCoy was nullified by Baseball Commissioner K.M. Landis. The verdict made several Tigers free agents.

Through years of last place finishes with Philadelphia, Moses had little chance to display his speed on the basepaths. But in 1943, with the Chicago White Sox, he posted a career-high 56 stolen bases and co-led the American League in triples (12). A strong-armed right fielder, he led the AL in putouts (329) in 1945.

In the 1946 World Series with the Boston Red Sox, Moses hit .417 (5-for-12) and tied a WS record with four hits in a game. He finished his career with the Athletics in 1951.

His first 7 years with the A's (1935-1941) were the most productive in his career. Moses surpassed .300 in every season. He posted 61 home runs, 354 rbi, and hit .317 (1135-for-3580). After being traded away after the 1941 season, he never hit .300 again and his productivity declined, posting 28 home runs, 325 rbi, and batting .266 (1003-for-3776) over the next 10 seasons with the White Sox and Red Sox and the A's again. The closest he came to the .300 plateau is when he hit .295 with the White Sox in 1945. His second tenure with the A's (1949-1951) was not even close to the numbers he put up with them at the beginning of his career.

In a 17-season career, Moses hit .291 with 89 home runs and 679 RBI in 2012 games played. He added 1,124 runs, 2,138 hits, 435 doubles, 110 triples and 174 stolen bases. His career fielding percentage was .973. A patient hitter with a good eye, Moses collected a 1.80 walk-to-strikeout ratio (821-to-457). He also made the American League All-Star team in 1937 and 1945.

Following his playing career, Moses was a coach for the Athletics (1952–54, the A's final three seasons in Philadelphia), Philadelphia Phillies (1955–58), Cincinnati Reds (1959–60), New York Yankees (1961–62; 1966) and Detroit Tigers (1967–70), serving as both a first base coach and hitting instructor. He also was a minor league batting coach and scout for the Yankees.

Moses died in Vidalia, Georgia, just two days after his 80th birthday.

Moses was the last 20th century Athletics player with a 200-hit season. He had 208 in 1937. Sixty-five years later, Miguel Tejada collected 204 (October 5, 2002).

See also

References

  1. ^ "A Moses Emerges To Aid A's". The Sporting News. January 3, 1935. p. 1.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Ralph Houk
Vern Benson
New York Yankees first base coach
1961–1962
1966
Succeeded by
Yogi Berra
Loren Babe
Preceded by
Pat Mullin
Detroit Tigers first base coach
1967–1970
Succeeded by
Frank Skaff
1934 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1934 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 78 wins and 82 losses.

1935 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1935 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 58 wins and 91 losses.

Before 1935, 20th Street residents could see games for free over the 12-foot right-field fence of Shibe Park and fans could see the laundry lines on the roofs of 20th Street houses. Connie Mack lost a lawsuit to prevent this, so he built the high right-field 'spite' fence.

1938 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1938 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 53 wins and 99 losses.

1939 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1939 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing seventh in the American League with a record of 55 wins and 97 losses.

1940 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1940 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 54 wins and 100 losses.

1941 Play Ball Cards

The Play Ball baseball card sets, issued by Gum Inc. from 1939 to 1941, are sets filled with various rookies, stars, and Hall of Famers. The 1941 set has a total of 72 cards. The more valuable cards in the set include Ted Williams ($1500), Joe DiMaggio ($2500), and the rookie Pee Wee Reese ($400–$600). Any Play Ball cards are relatively rare, and if highly graded the cards demand a premium. The 1941 Play Ball set is the only Play Ball set with color.

1942 Chicago White Sox season

The 1942 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 43rd season. They finished with a record 66–82, good enough for 6th place in the American League, 34 games behind the 1st place New York Yankees.

1942 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1942 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 55 wins and 99 losses.

1943 Chicago White Sox season

The 1943 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 43rd season in the major leagues, and their 44th season overall. They finished with a record 82–72, good enough for 4th place in the American League, 16 games behind the first place New York Yankees.

1944 Chicago White Sox season

The 1944 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 44th season in the major leagues, and their 45th season overall. They finished with a record 71–83, good enough for 7th place in the American League, 18 games behind the first place St. Louis Browns.

1945 Chicago White Sox season

The 1945 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 45th season in the major leagues, and their 46th season overall. They finished with a record 71–78, good enough for 6th place in the American League, 15 games behind the 1st place Detroit Tigers.

1946 Boston Red Sox season

The 1946 Boston Red Sox season was the 46th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 104 wins and 50 losses. This was the team's sixth AL championship, and their first since 1918. In the 1946 World Series, the Red Sox lost to the National League (NL) champion St. Louis Cardinals, whose winning run in the seventh game was scored on Enos Slaughter's famous "Mad Dash".

1946 Chicago White Sox season

The 1946 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 46th season in the major leagues, and their 47th season overall. They finished with a record 74–80, good enough for 5th place in the American League, 30 games behind the first place Boston Red Sox.

1949 Boston Red Sox season

The 1949 Boston Red Sox season was the 49th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 96 wins and 58 losses. The Red Sox set a major league record which still stands for the most base on balls by a team in a season, with 835.

1952 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1952 Philadelphia Athletics season saw the A's finish fourth in the American League with a record of 79 wins and 75 losses. They finished 16 games behind the eventual World Series Champion New York Yankees. The Athletics' 1952 campaign would be their final winning season in Philadelphia; it would also be their only winning season of the 1950s. The Athletics would have to wait until 1968, their first season in Oakland, for their next winning record.

Augusta Tigers

The Augusta Yankees were a South Atlantic League minor league baseball team based in Augusta, Georgia that played from 1962 to 1963. The team was managed by Ernie White in 1962 and Rube Walker in 1963. It played its home games at Jennings Stadium. Notable players include Pete Mikkelsen, Dooley Womack and Roger Repoz.The Augusta Tigers were a minor league baseball team that existed on-and-off from 1936 to 1958. Based in Augusta, Georgia, they played in the South Atlantic League from 1936 to 1942, from 1946 to 1952 and from 1955 to 1958. They were affiliated with the Detroit Tigers in 1936, from 1941 to 1942 and from 1955 to 1958. From 1937 to 1940 and from 1946 to 1949 they were affiliated with the New York Yankees. In 1950, they were affiliated with the Washington Senators. They played their home games at Jennings Stadium.The Augusta Wolves were a South Atlantic League (1930) and Palmetto League (1931) minor league baseball team based in Augusta, Georgia. The team played its home games at Jennings Stadium. Multiple notable players spent time with the team, including Debs Garms and Wally Moses.The Augusta Tygers were a minor league baseball team based in Augusta, Georgia, USA. They played in the South Atlantic League from 1922 to 1929. In 1926, under manager Johnny Nee, they were the league champions.They were named after Ty Cobb, who began his professional career in Augusta in 1904.They played their home games at Jennings Stadium.

The Augusta Georgians were a minor league baseball team that played from 1920 to 1921 in the South Atlantic League. Based in Augusta, Georgia, USA, they were managed by Dolly Stark in 1920 and by Emil Huhn in 1921. Under Stark, they went 55-68, and under Huhn they went 78-68.Notable players include Troy Agnew, Bud Davis, Doc Knowlson, Curt Walker, Doc Bass, Don Songer, and Stark himself.

Benny McCoy

Benjamin Jenison McCoy (November 9, 1915 – November 9, 2011) was a second baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1938–1939) and Philadelphia Athletics (1940–1941). Listed at 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m). 170 lb., he batted left-handed and threw right-handed. He was born in Jenison, Michigan.

McCoy was 22 years old when he entered the majors in September 1938 with the Detroit Tigers, appearing in seven games while hitting a .200 batting average (3-for-15). In 1939, though he played just two months for Detroit after Charlie Gehringer was injured, McCoy hit .302 with 33 runs batted in and 38 runs scored in 55 games played. At the end of the season, he was dealt by the Tigers to the Philadelphia Athletics in exchange for Wally Moses.

But McCoy was among 91 Detroit minor league players declared free agents by baseball commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis. The Tigers had been blocking players in their minor league system for years, players with major league skills, which was a fairly common practice in those days as there were only 16 big league clubs and precious few jobs. For a middle infielder, McCoy was a very good offensive player, but Detroit had Gehringer and he was blocked in the minors.

With the deal canceled, McCoy had bids from ten major-league clubs. The Washington Senators offered him a bonus of $20,000, the New York Giants raised it to $25,000, the Brooklyn Dodgers to $35,000, and the Pittsburgh Pirates and Cincinnati Reds to $40,000. McCoy, who got $15 for his first major league season and thought his $5,000 in 1939 was big money, accepted the Philadelphia Athletics'offer: a $45,000 bonus, a two-year contract at $10,000 a year, and a regular job at second base under the tutorial guidance of manager Connie Mack. His was not only the biggest bonus in major league history, $20,000 more than the previous top, given Rick Ferrell by the St. Louis Browns in 1929, but it made McCoy the highest-paid bigleaguer of the year. His 1940 income of $55,000 will be more than the salary of Joe Di Maggio, Jimmy Foxx or Hank Greenberg.

McCoy played in 1940 and 1941 with the Athletics. His most productive season came in 1941, when he hit .271 with 61 RBI and posted career-highs in games (141), hits (140), walks (95), runs (86), home runs (8), and triples (7). He spent the next four years in the US Navy during World War II. When he returned from service, his skills had eroded and he never played another game.

In a four-season career, McCoy was a .269 hitter (327-for-1214) with 16 home runs and 156 RBI in 337 games, including 182 runs, 327 hits, 52 doubles, 18 triples, and eight stolen bases. A selective and patient hitter, he posted a solid .384 on-base percentage and a respectable 1.56 strikeout-to-walk ratio (190-to-122).

McCoy played in the National Baseball Congress with the St Joseph's Autos team in 1946.Before his death, he was recognized as one of the oldest living major league ballplayers.

McCoy died on his 96th birthday on November 9, 2011.

Galveston Buccaneers

The Galveston Buccaneers were a Minor League Baseball team that existed from 1931 to 1937. Based in Galveston, Texas, United States, they played in the Texas League. Their home ballpark was Moody Stadium. Notable players include Del Pratt, Beau Bell, Wally Moses and Harry Brecheen. In 1934, they were the league champions.From 1933 to 1935, the Buccaneers were in the playoffs for the Texas League title. In 1933, they were the runners-up in the Championship Series to the San Antonio Missions. In 1934, Galveston captured only its third Texas League crown; the other titles were in 1890 and 1899. In 1935, the Buccaneers finished third with an 86–75 record but were defeated in the first round of the playoffs.

Jack Hallett

Jack Price Hallett (November 13, 1914 – June 11, 1982) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who played for the Chicago White Sox, Pittsburgh Pirates and New York Giants between 1940 and 1948. He was a 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m), 215 pounds (98 kg) right-hander.

Hallett, a native of Toledo, Ohio, made his big-league debut on September 13, 1940 at the age of 25 for the White Sox, wearing #28. In two games that year, he went 1 and 1 with a 6.43 ERA in 14 innings of work.

In 1941, Hallett spent time as both a starter and reliever. He posted a 5 and 5 record and a 6.03 ERA. On December 9, 1941, Hallett was traded from the White Sox with Mike Kreevich to the Philadelphia Athletics for Wally Moses. He went from the A's to the Toronto Maple Leafs in the International League in the spring of 1942 before being traded in September to the Pirates. He appeared in only 3 games in 1942, starting all of them. He had an 0 and 1 record, but he completed two of the games he appeared in. In 1943, with his number changed to 40, he posted a tiny 1.70 ERA in 47 innings of work, but still had a losing record of 1 and 2.

Hallett missed 1944 and 1945, serving in the Pacific with the Navy during World War II.Hallett came back after his time in the military and posted a solid 3.29 ERA in 115 innings of work for the Pirates in 1946. Still, his record was only 5 and 7. His number was 39.

After playing for the minor league Indianapolis Indians in 1947, Hallett came back in 1948 and finished his big league career with the Giants at the age of 33. In four innings of work in 1948 and wearing number 40, he posted a 4.50 ERA. His final game was on April 29.

Overall, Hallett went 12 and 16 in 277 innings of work over a span of six seasons. He appeared in a total of 73 games, starting 24 of them and completing 11 of his starts (2 of his complete games were shutouts). His career ERA was 4.05. He was a fairly solid batter, hitting .238 with one home run in 80 career at-bats. He was a perfect fielder, committing zero errors. His career pitching statistics are most similar to those of Jim Britton.

Hallett died in 1982 at the age of 67 in Toledo, Ohio. He was buried at the United Church of Christ Cemetery in Holgate, Ohio.

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