Wally Berger

Walter Anton Berger (October 10, 1905 – November 30, 1988) was a Major League Baseball outfielder who played for four National League teams, primarily the Boston Braves. Berger was the National League's starting center fielder in baseball's first All-Star Game.

One of the league's top sluggers of the early 1930s, in his initial 1930 season he hit 38 home runs, a record for rookies which stood until 1987; he still holds a share of the NL record. He also led the league in home runs and runs batted in in 1935 despite the Braves having the fourth-most losses in MLB history, and went on to become the seventh NL player to hit 200 career home runs.

Wally Berger
Wally Berger card
Outfielder
Born: October 10, 1905
Chicago, Illinois
Died: November 30, 1988 (aged 83)
Redondo Beach, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 15, 1930, for the Boston Braves
Last MLB appearance
July 2, 1940, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Batting average.300
Home runs242
Runs batted in898
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early life

Born in Chicago but raised in San Francisco, Berger played third base for Mission High School, sharing the infield with future Hall of Fame shortstop and American League president Joe Cronin, who manned second base.

Professional career

Through 2019, he was one of four players to hit 20 or more home runs in their rookie year before July, along with Albert Pujols (2001), Joc Pederson (2015) and Cody Bellinger (2017).[1] Berger's 38 home runs as a 1930 rookie established a major league record that would stand for 57 years until eclipsed by Mark McGwire's 49 in 1987; his NL record was tied by Frank Robinson in 1956, but has not been broken. Berger still shares the major league record for home runs by a first-year player (no prior major league games) and for being the fastest player to hit 20 home runs (51 games), shared with Gary Sánchez (who accomplished the feat on September 27, 2016)[2] and Cody Bellinger (June 19, 2017).[3] Berger batted .310 that season, and his 119 runs batted in were also an NL rookie record, since topped by Albert Pujols in 2001.

Berger made the NL All-Star team in the first four years the game was held (1933–36), starting in the first two. In 1933 he finished third in the Most Valuable Player voting, behind Carl Hubbell and Chuck Klein, after hitting 27 home runs (half the Braves team total), second in the league behind Klein's 28. That same year, when Babe Ruth was asked once again to make his annual selection of the game's best, he named Berger as his center fielder. Of the eighteen players who started the 1934 All-Star Game, Berger is the only player not elected to the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1935, he led NL outfielders in putouts with 458. Eddie Mathews broke his Braves franchise record of 38 home runs in 1953, the team's first year in Milwaukee, and surpassed his mark of 199 career home runs in 1957.

After a 1936 shoulder injury, Berger was traded to the New York Giants in June 1937; his first home run for the team was the 200th of his career. In the 1937 World Series, he made only three pinch-hitting appearances, going hitless. In June 1938 he was traded to the Cincinnati Reds, where he would remain until 1940; his 1939 World Series performance was even more dismal than in 1937, going 0 for 15. He ended his career in 1940 with the Philadelphia Phillies. In an 11-season career, Berger posted a .300 batting average with 242 home runs and 898 RBI in 1350 games played.

Post-playing career

Following his retirement as a player, he was a scout for the New York Yankees and managed their Manchester, New Hampshire, minor league team in 1949.

Berger died of a stroke in Redondo Beach, California, in 1988. He was interred at Inglewood Park Cemetery in Inglewood, California.

See also

References

  1. ^ Stephen, Eric (June 29, 2015). "Joc Pederson reaches 20 home runs before July 1". SB Nation. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  2. ^ Kerber, Fred (September 27, 2016). "Gary Sanchez's MLB-record-equaling HR keeps Yankees alive". New York Post. Retrieved September 27, 2016.
  3. ^ Baer, Bill (June 19, 2017). "Cody Bellinger sets major league record with 21 home runs through first 51 games". NBC Sports. Retrieved June 20, 2017.

Further reading

External links

1930 Boston Braves season

The 1930 Boston Braves season was the 60th season of the franchise.

1932 Boston Braves season

The 1932 Boston Braves season was the 62nd season of the franchise.

1933 Boston Braves season

The 1933 Boston Braves season was the 63rd season of the franchise.

1933 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1933 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the first edition of the All-Star Game known as the "Midsummer Classic". This was the first official playing of the midseason exhibition baseball game between Major League Baseball's (MLB's) National League (NL) and American League (AL) All-Star teams. The game was held on July 6, 1933, at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois, the home of the AL's Chicago White Sox. The game resulted in the AL defeating the NL 4–2, in two hours and five minutes.

The first MLB All-Star game (unofficial all-star game called the Addie Joss Benefit Game) was held on July 24, 1911, in Cleveland at Cleveland League Park (League Park, 1891–1946), the American League All-Stars versus the Cleveland Naps (1903–1915). The AL All-Stars won 5-3.

1934 Boston Braves season

The 1934 Boston Braves season was the 64th season of the franchise. The Braves finished in fourth place in the National League with a record of 78 wins and 73 losses.

1934 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1934 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the second playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 10 at the Polo Grounds in Manhattan, the home of the New York Giants of the National League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 9–7.

The game is well known among baseball historians for the performance of NL starting pitcher Carl Hubbell. After allowing the first two batters to reach base on a single and a base on balls, Hubbell struck out five of the game's best hitters – Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Al Simmons and Joe Cronin – in succession, setting a longstanding All-Star Game record for consecutive strikeouts.

1935 Boston Braves season

The 1935 Boston Braves season was the 65th season of the franchise. The Braves finished with the worst record in the National League and the majors, with a record of 38 wins and 115 losses.In an attempt to make his dream come true to manage, Babe Ruth came to the Braves in February 1935. He was hired as vice president and assistant manager, and team owner Emil Fuchs promised Ruth a share of team profits.

1935 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1935 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the third playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 8, 1935, at Cleveland Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio, hosted by the Cleveland Indians of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 4–1.

1935 Major League Baseball season

The 1935 Major League Baseball season.

1936 Boston Bees season

The 1936 Boston Bees season was the 66th season of the franchise. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 71–83, 21 games behind the New York Giants. This was their first season under the nickname of Bees, which they would keep until 1940.

1937 Boston Bees season

The 1937 Boston Bees season was the 67th season of the franchise. They finished the season with 79 wins and 73 losses.

1937 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1937 New York Giants season was the franchise's 55th season. The Giants won the National League pennant. The team went on to lose to the New York Yankees in the 1937 World Series, four games to one.

1938 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1938 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 82–68, 6 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1939 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1939 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished first in the National League, winning the pennant by 4½ games over the St. Louis Cardinals with a record of 97–57. The team went on to the 1939 World Series, which it lost in four straight games to the New York Yankees.

1940 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1940 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball that represented the Cincinnati Reds. Cincinnati entered the season as the reigning National League champions, having been swept by the New York Yankees in the World Series. Cincinnati won 100 games for the first time in franchise history. The team went 100-53 during the season, best in MLB. The team finished first in the National League with a record of 100–53, winning the pennant by 12 games over the Brooklyn Dodgers. They went on to face the Detroit Tigers in the 1940 World Series, beating them in seven games. This was their first championship since 1919.

1949 New York Yankees season

The 1949 New York Yankees season was the team's 47th season in New York, and its 49th season overall. The team finished with a record of 97–57, winning their 16th pennant, finishing 1 game ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Casey Stengel in his first year. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 5 games.

Frank Gabler

Frank Harold Gabler (November 6, 1911 – November 1, 1967) was a right-handed Major League Baseball pitcher who played for the New York Giants (1935–1937), Boston Bees (1937–1938) and Chicago White Sox (1938). He was nicknamed The Great Gabbo.

Gabler made his major league debut on April 19, 1935 with the Giants. In his rookie season, he went 2–1 with a 5.70 ERA in 26 appearances (one start). The following season, Gabler went 9–8 with a 3.12 ERA in 43 games (14 starts) for the Giants. He began 1937 with the New York team, however he was traded to the Bees with cash for Wally Berger on June 15. In 25 games in 1938, Gabler went 4–7 with a 5.61 ERA. Gabler began the 1938 season with the Bees, appeared in one game for them and was then purchased by the White Sox on May 2. He appeared in 19 games (seven starts) and went 1–7 with a 9.43 ERA. On September 29, 1938, he appeared in his final big league game. Overall, he went 16–23 with a 5.26 ERA in 113 games in his four-year big league career.He appeared in one World Series – in 1936. He made two relief appearances against the New York Yankees and posted a 7.20 ERA.

Gabler played in the minor leagues as well, from 1932 to 1934, 1939 to 1942, 1946 and 1949 to 1952. He went 59–68 in 313 games over a 12-year minor league career. He managed the Idaho Falls Russets for part of the 1949 season, the Yuma Panthers for part of the 1950 season and the El Centro Imps for part of the 1952 season.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Children's Program

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Children's Program is presented to television programming aimed towards children in any format. Series, specials and non-fiction programming are all eligible for the award. Prior to 1974, both daytime and primetime programming was eligible. However, once the Daytime Emmy Awards were formed, only primetime television remained eligible.

Utah–Idaho League

TheUtah–Idaho League was a six-team minor league baseball organization founded in 1926 as a class C league. The Pacific Coast League used the Utah-Idaho for player development, but travel costs in the mountainous territory plagued the league and it shut down after the 1928 season.

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