WTXF-TV

WTXF-TV, virtual channel 29 (UHF digital channel 31), is a Fox owned-and-operated television station licensed to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. The station is owned by the Fox Television Stations subsidiary of Fox Corporation. WTXF's studios are located on Market Street in Center City, and its transmitter is located on the Roxborough tower farm.

WTXF-TV
WTXF-TV logo
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
United States
BrandingFox 29 (general)
Fox 29 News (newscasts)
SloganWe Go There!
(primary news)
We Are Fox 29 (general)
ChannelsDigital: 31 (UHF)
Virtual: 29 (PSIP)
Translators25 (UHF) Allentown
Affiliations29.1: Fox (O&O)
29.2: Movies!
29.3: Light TV
29.4: Buzzr
OwnerFox Television Stations, LLC
FoundedAugust 1962[1][2]
First air dateMay 16, 1965
Call letters' meaningTVX Broadcasting (former owner)
in Ph(F)iladelphia;
also disambiguation of former WTAF-TV calls
Former callsigns
  • WIBF-TV (1965–1969)
  • WTAF-TV (1969–1988)
Former channel number(s)
  • Analog:
  • 29 (UHF, 1965–2009)
  • Digital:
  • 42 (UHF, 2002–2019)
Former affiliationsIndependent (1965–1986)
Transmitter power620 kW
499 kW (CP)
Height343 m (1,125 ft)
Facility ID51568
Transmitter coordinates40°2′26″N 75°14′19″W / 40.04056°N 75.23861°WCoordinates: 40°2′26″N 75°14′19″W / 40.04056°N 75.23861°W
Licensing authorityFCC
Public license informationProfile
CDBS
Websitewww.fox29.com

History

Early years

The station signed on the air on May 16, 1965, as independent station WIBF-TV. The station was founded by the Fox family, who held real estate interests in the Philadelphia suburb of Jenkintown; William L. Fox was the station's principal shareholder, along with his brother Irwin C. Fox, their father Benjamin Fox, and business associate Dorothy Kotin.[3][4] The Fox family, who had already been operating WIBF-FM (103.9, now WPHI-FM) since November 1960, was awarded a construction permit to build channel 29 in August 1962. Channel 29's original studio was co-located with WIBF-FM in the Fox family's Benson East apartment building on Old York Road in Jenkintown. WIBF-TV was the first commercial UHF station in Philadelphia, and the first of three UHF independents in the Philadelphia market to sign-on during 1965, with WPHL-TV (channel 17) and WKBS-TV (channel 48) both making their debuts in September. WIBF-TV struggled at first, in part because it signed on only a year after the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) required television manufacturers to include UHF tuning capability.

Prior to the debut of WIBF-TV, there was an earlier attempt to put a channel 29 station on the air in Philadelphia. WIP radio, then owned by Gimbels department store, was granted an FCC construction permit in November 1952 as part of a wave of UHF station applications and assignments following a four-year-long freeze on permit awards.[5] Intended to be called WIP-TV, this station did not make it to air as WIP relinquished its construction permit in May 1954.[6]

Wtaf85
WTAF-TV logo under Taft ownership, c. 1985. The "29" was first used in 1979 and was retained until 1995, long after the station became WTXF-TV.

By the fall of 1968, the Foxes disclosed that their broadcasting operations were operating with a deficit of more than $2 million.[7] It would prove to be a major factor in the decision to sell WIBF-TV to Cincinnati-based Taft Broadcasting, a transaction which closed in May 1969 for $4.5 million (including assumption of debt), at the time the most spent for a UHF facility.[8][9] Taft also owned WNEP-TV (channel 16) in Scranton, whose signal area also included coverage of the Lehigh Valley, which is part of the Philadelphia market; indeed, WNEP has operated a translator there for years. When applying to acquire channel 29 at the FCC, Taft sought a waiver to keep both stations; the FCC at that time normally did not allow common ownership of two stations with overlapping coverage areas, even if they were in different markets. The FCC granted the waiver [10] and the two neighboring outlets were co-owned until 1973, when Taft sold WNEP-TV to a group composed of the station's executives and employees.

Taft assumed control of channel 29 in mid-1969 and changed the call letters to WTAF-TV in November.[11] Under Taft's ownership, WTAF-TV soon established itself as a local powerhouse. Channel 29 ran programs from Taft's archive, such as Hanna-Barbera cartoons, which from 1979 onward were distributed by Worldvision Enterprises (which Taft had purchased), and later on the Quinn Martin library. By the start of the 1980s, WTAF had passed WKBS-TV as Philadelphia's leading independent station. From the mid-1970s through the mid-1980s, it was also carried on several cable providers on the New Jersey side of the New York City market, as far north as The Oranges. When WKBS-TV went dark in the late summer of 1983, the station placed advertisements in TV Guide and local papers reminding Philadelphia viewers that channel 29 was still around and that channel 48's former audience was welcome to sample channel 29. However, the station passed on picking up any of channel 48's shows, most of which went to WPHL-TV. Channel 29 also aired network shows that ABC affiliate WPVI-TV (channel 6) and then-NBC affiliate KYW-TV (channel 3) preempted in favor of local programming.

WTAF-TV also became a strong sports station. At various times, it owned the broadcast rights to Major League Baseball's Philadelphia Phillies (Taft also owned a small portion of the team for much of the 1980s), the NHL's Philadelphia Flyers and the NBA's Philadelphia 76ers. The station also carried games of the Philadelphia Bell of the short-lived World Football League in 1974–75. (On August 29, 1975, the Bell were playing a televised contest against the Southern California Sun in Anaheim. Already starting late at night due to the time difference, WTAF viewers never got to see the end of the 58-39 Sun victory, as the station signed off before the game was completed.)[12]

Joining Fox

On October 9, 1986, WTAF-TV became a charter affiliate of the fledgling Fox television network.[13] Initially channel 29's schedule did not change drastically, as Fox didn't air a full week of programming until 1993; for all intents and purposes, it was still programmed as an independent outlet.

Taft sold its independent and Fox-affiliated stations, including WTAF-TV, to the Norfolk, Virginia-based TVX Broadcast Group in February 1987.[14][15] On June 1, 1988, the new owners changed channel 29's calls to WTXF-TV. The Taft purchase created a large debt load for TVX, and as a result, the company sold a number of its smaller stations.[16] Paramount Pictures purchased a majority stake in TVX in 1989.[17] The following year, after branding itself as TV 29 for many years, the station changed its on-air branding to Fox 29. In 1991, Paramount acquired the remaining stock in TVX that it did not already own, and the company's name was changed to the Paramount Stations Group, with WTXF as its largest station by market size.[18]

Becoming a Fox-owned outlet

In August 1993, Fox shockingly announced its intention to purchase rival independent WGBS-TV (channel 57, now WPSG) and move its programming there in April 1994.[19] As staffers at WTXF-TV continued to reel in the aftermath of that announcement, its corporate parent was undergoing a transition of its own. Only one month later in September, the original Viacom agreed in principle to merge with Paramount.[20] Not long after that, West Chester-based home shopping giant QVC mounted a competing bid and the two firms entered into an intense bidding war,[21][22][23] in which Viacom ultimately prevailed in February 1994, with the deal closing on March 11, 1994.[24]

Meanwhile, in late October 1993, Paramount announced plans to create a new network, the United Paramount Network (UPN), which it would co-own with Chris-Craft Industries. The initial affiliation plans called for WTXF, which was set to lose Fox to WGBS, becoming the Philadelphia outlet for the new network, which was targeted to launch in January 1995.[25] However, Fox's purchase of WGBS fell through in early 1994, making it increasingly unlikely that Paramount would want to drop Fox programming from channel 29 (particularly after Fox acquired the rights to show games from the NFL's National Football Conference, including most Philadelphia Eagles games);[26] nonetheless, during the spring, WTXF gradually de-emphasized its Fox affiliation, changing its branding to simply "29".

Several months later, the shoe dropped on the biggest affiliation shuffle in Philadelphia television history. In the summer of 1994, Westinghouse Broadcasting, owners of KYW-TV, entered into a longterm affiliation agreement with CBS. This resulted in KYW-TV dropping NBC in favor of CBS, which would then sell its longtime owned-and-operated station, WCAU-TV (channel 10).[27] Several months earlier, Fox entered into a multi-station, multi-year partnership with New World Communications.[28] New World and NBC emerged as the leading bidders for WCAU, with New World intending to switch WCAU to Fox if it emerged victorious. Meanwhile, then-WGBS-TV parent Combined Broadcasting ended sales negotiations with Fox due to the FCC's concerns over Fox's foreign ownership.[29] Fox then joined the bidding for WCAU in case New World's bid failed. However, Paramount/Viacom changed its Philadelphia plans and decided to sell WTXF-TV to Fox, making channel 29 a Fox-owned station; this effectively handed WCAU-TV to NBC.[30] Almost simultaneously, Viacom bought WGBS-TV and made it Philadelphia's UPN outlet. Both transactions involving Viacom and Fox closed on the same day—August 25, 1995.

Soon after taking control of channel 29, Fox rebranded it as Fox Philadelphia (similar to how Chicago sister station WFLD was branded as Fox Chicago) with the channel number used sparingly and the call letters mostly relegated to legal IDs; this was because WTXF, to this day, is normally not on channel 29 on area cable systems (though for the first few months, it was merely branded as "Fox" with the call letters below a color-changing Fox logo in promos). As a Fox owned-and-operated station, WTXF immediately added more first run talk and reality shows to the schedule. Throughout the mid-to-late 1990s, WTXF was available nationally to satellite television providers as the East Coast Fox feed, most notably on PrimeStar.

In 2003, WTXF rebranded back to Fox 29 for the first time since 1994 to create a consistent use of the Fox (channel number) branding across all Fox-owned stations. WTXF also underwent a major overhaul of its studio facilities in Old City Philadelphia, with a "Window on the World"-type studio making its debut on June 6, 2005. The "Window of the World" studio was originally intended to be used for the station's morning newscast.

It is a historical irony that the station, originally owned locally by the Fox family as WIBF-TV, is now owned by Los Angeles-based Fox Broadcasting Company.

On December 14, 2017, The Walt Disney Company, owner of ABC and WPVI-TV, announced its intent to buy WTXF's parent company, 21st Century Fox, for $52.4 billion; the sale excluded the Fox Television Stations unit (including WTXF), the Fox network, Fox News, Fox Sports 1 and the MyNetworkTV programming service, which were transferred to a separate company.[31][32]

Digital television

Digital channels

The station's digital signal is multiplexed:

Channel Video Aspect PSIP Short Name Programming[33]
29.1 720p 16:9 WTXF-DT Main WTXF-TV programming / Fox
29.2 480i Movies! Movies![34]
29.3 Light TV Light TV
29.4 4:3 BUZZR Buzzr[35]

WTXF-TV has plans for a Mobile DTV feed of subchannel 29.1.[36][37]

Analog-to-digital conversion

WTXF-TV shut down its analog signal, over UHF channel 29, on June 12, 2009, the official date in which full-power television stations in the United States transitioned from analog to digital broadcasts under federal mandate. The station's digital signal continued to broadcasts on its pre-transition UHF channel 42.[38][39] Through the use of PSIP, digital television receivers display the station's virtual channel as its former UHF analog channel 29.

Translators

Call letters Channel City of license Transmitter location
WTXF-TV 25 Allentown Atop South Mountain in Allentown

On December 29, 2014, WTXF-TV announced the launch of their Allentown translator to allow northern tier viewers to better receive and watch Fox 29 and its sub-channels.

News operation

WTXF presently broadcasts 53 hours of locally produced newscasts each week (with nine hours each weekday and four hours each on Saturdays and Sundays); in regards to the number of hours devoted to news programming, it is the highest local newscast output among the Philadelphia market's broadcast television stations, and highest in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in general. In areas of central New Jersey where the Philadelphia and New York City markets overlap, WTXF shares resources with New York City sister station and fellow Fox O&O WNYW. The stations share reporters for stories occurring in New Jersey.

Throughout the early 1980s, WTAF-TV aired the syndicated Independent Network News, which was produced by then-independent station WPIX in New York City. This lasted until channel 29 began its own in-house news department. Taft Broadcasting started a news department for the station in the spring of 1986, with the debut of a nightly 10 p.m. newscast. It was the second attempt at a primetime newscast in the market, after WKBS-TV ran a short-lived program in the late 1970s. Channel 29's effort has been the longest-running, and the most successful; it was expanded to an hour-long newscast in 1990. On April 1, 1996, shortly after channel 29 became a Fox-owned station, the station replaced the children's programs that had been airing on weekday mornings in favor of what at its launch was a three-hour long newscast called Good Day Philadelphia; partnered with it was a straighter newscast called Good Day at 6:30, which was replaced in the fall of 1997 by the hour-long Fox Morning News. The overall branding of news at this point was Fox News Philadelphia or just Fox News; it is possible that potential viewer confusion with the Fox News Channel played a part in the station's rebranding back to "Fox 29" in 2003.

On October 1, 2006, WTXF became the second television station in the Philadelphia market to begin broadcasting its local newscasts in high definition. Eight days later on October 9, the station debuted a half-hour midday newscast at 11 a.m. On January 22, 2007, a new hour-long newscast at 5 p.m. debuted, enabling channel 29 to go head-to-head with two of the three other network-owned stations (WPVI-TV and WCAU). On October 6, 2007, WTXF launched hour-long 6 p.m. newscasts on Saturday and Sunday evenings. From September 1 to November 3, 2008, WTXF aired an election-themed 11 p.m. newscast called The Last Word, anchored by 5 p.m. anchor Kerri-Lee Halkett.

Ted Kaufman on Good Day Philadelphia
Senator Ted Kaufman (D-DE) appears on Good Day Philadelphia on February 2, 2009.

On November 13, 2008, Fox Television Stations and NBC Local Media entered into an agreement to test a system that would allow stations owned by Fox and NBC to pool news resources ranging from sharing field video footage to sharing aerial helicopter footage. WTXF and WCAU were the first stations to undertake the Local News Service arrangement as an effective way to deal with the difficulties in the costs of running news operations.[40] On September 7, 2009, channel 29 expanded its morning and evening news programming: Good Day Philadelphia was expanded to five hours on that date with the addition of an hour at 9 a.m. (the fifth hour of the broadcast replaced The Morning Show with Mike & Juliet, whose co-host Mike Jerrick returned to WTXF as 7–10 a.m. anchor of Good Day on July 27, 2009), the station also expanded its 6 p.m. newscast to weekdays as a half-hour broadcast. On March 29, 2010, WTXF expanded Good Day once again with the start time moved back by a half-hour to 4:30 a.m.

On September 8, 2010, anchor Kerri-Lee Halkett went on a personal leave; a WTXF representative said that Halkett would return to the station in mid-October of that year. However, on September 23, 2010, it was announced that Halkett had decided to leave channel 29 to relocate to Connecticut (where her husband was living), allowing Halkett to accept a job as an anchor for Hartford NBC O&O WVIT (channel 30). Lauren Cohn took over Halkett's co-anchoring duties with Thomas Drayton on the weeknight 5, 6 and 10 p.m. newscasts; Cohn was replaced one year later by freelance reporter Kerry Barrett.

In 2011, WTXF began using the AFD #10 broadcast flag to present their newscasts in letterboxed widescreen for viewers watching on cable television through 4:3 television sets (in a similar manner to what certain cable channels such as Fox News Channel, HLN and CNN have done around or since that point).

In addition to its own newscasts, on July 8, 2013 WTXF began airing Chasing New Jersey, a daily New Jersey-focused public affairs program. Chasing New Jersey, which is produced by Fairfax Productions (a production company led by WTXF's vice president and general manager) from a studio in Trenton and hosted by Bill Spadea, was designed to replace the 10:00 p.m. newscast on sister station WWOR-TV. The program currently airs on WTXF at 3 a.m. early Tuesday through Saturday mornings and now is simply called Chasing News with Bill Spadea.[41] On September 20, 2014, WTXF debuted weekend editions of the Good Day Philadelphia morning newscast (under the title #Fox29Weekend) at 8:00 a.m., which ran for two hours on Saturdays and one hour on Sundays.[42] In February 2016, the Sunday edition of Good Day Philadelphia Weekend was extended to become a 2-hour broadcast and both editions' start times were moved up by an hour to air from 7 to 9 a.m.

On August 1, 2016, the station debuted a half-hour newscast at 11 p.m. which is broadcast from a revamped studio that was revealed that same night on the 10 p.m. broadcast. This shorter edition is currently co-anchored by Shaina Humphries and Jason Martinez, who also anchor the 5, 6 and 10 p.m. editions. Humphries joined the station in February 2019 and Martinez joined in June of the same year. It was originally anchored by Lucy Noland, who co-anchored the 5, 6 and 10 p.m. editions alongside Iain Page until Page departed the station on January 24, 2019 to pursue other interests, thus making Noland the sole anchor of all four editions of the newscast.[43] This continued until February 18, 2019, when Humphries joined the station and officially became the lead anchor for the 6 and 11 p.m. newscasts, while Noland retained her position as anchor of the 5 and 10 p.m. newscasts. Noland left the station after five years and her last broadcast was on May 30, 2019. Martinez officially joined the broadcast on June 17 as Humphries' co-anchor.[44][45] Sports reporter Kristen Rodgers and meteorologist Kathy Orr carry over from the 10 p.m. edition.[46] This expansion only occurs on the Sunday-Friday newscasts as the Saturday edition ends at 11 p.m. The expanded edition was done on Sundays during the NFL season as the broadcast was followed by a simulcast of NFL Network's NFL GameDay Prime program, and is currently followed by an hour-long weekend edition of the locally produced daily entertainment program The Q hosted by Good Day Philadelphia contributor and WRNB morning show host Quincy Harris.[47][48]

On January 5, 2017, the weekday edition of Good Day Philadelphia was expanded to six hours with Fox 29 Morning News, which originally aired from 4 to 6 a.m., being rebranded to Good Day Philadelphia.

Notable current on-air staff

Notable former on-air staff

Cable and satellite carriage

Out-of-market coverage

WTXF is carried in central New Jersey in parts of Hunterdon, Middlesex, Monmouth, Somerset and Warren, and Morris counties, usually on either channel 12 or 16. It is available to all customers in Ocean County with Comcast or Cablevision.

Comcast added WTXF's HD feed to its lineups in Ocean and southern Middlesex counties as well as Roosevelt and Lambertville, New Jersey on August 22, 2012 on digital channel 905.[49]

In Plumsted Township, Ocean County, WTXF is carried in lieu of WNYW as Plumsted is served by Comcast's Garden State system (based out of Mount Holly, Burlington County) which does not carry any New York City stations.[50] However, New York local channels are available on DirecTV and Dish Network in Plumsted and all of Ocean County.

In southern Delaware, WTXF (along with Washington, D.C. sister station WTTG) is available to Mediacom customers in the Millsboro area, and to Comcast customers in much of the rest of Sussex County. Although WBOC acts as the market's Fox affiliate through a subchannel of the station that carries programming from the network, the NFL designates the Salisbury/Rehoboth Beach television market as the broadcast territory for the Washington Redskins and Baltimore Ravens. Through Comcast's carriage of WTXF in southern Delaware, Philadelphia Eagles games are also viewable in that region. The station is also carried on cable in Cecil County, Maryland. There is no satellite carriage of the station outside of the Philadelphia market.

2010 Cablevision carriage dispute

On October 16, 2010, WTXF was among the Fox-owned broadcast stations and cable channels that were taken off Cablevision's Hamilton and Jersey Shore cable systems of as the result of a retransmission dispute between Cablevision and Fox's parent company, News Corporation (who also pulled the signal of sister stations WNYW (channel 5) and MyNetworkTV affiliate WWOR-TV (channel 9) on Cablevision's metropolitan New York system). In addition News Corporation had pulled Fox Business Network, Fox Deportes and National Geographic Wild from Cablevision systems in both the Philadelphia and New York markets. The shutdown came the morning the Phillies were set to begin play in the 2010 National League Championship Series, and also affects Fox's regional coverage of Philadelphia Eagles football games.[51]

The removal of WTXF and the three Fox-owned cable channels was due to an impasse between Fox and Cablevision on a retransmission agreement renewal in which Cablevision claims that News Corporation demanded $150 million a year for access to 12 Fox channels, including those that News Corporation had removed in the dispute. On October 14, 2010, Cablevision said that it was willing to submit to binding arbitration and called on Fox not to pull the plug on the channels, though News Corporation chose to reject Cablevision's call for arbitration, stating that it would "reward Cablevision for refusing to negotiate fairly".[52] On October 30, 2010, News Corporation and Cablevision reached a deal, ending the dispute and restoring WTXF, WNYW, WWOR, and the three News Corp-owned cable channels to Cablevision's lineup.

References

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External links

Cablevision

Cablevision Systems Corporation was an American cable television company with systems serving areas surrounding New York City. It was the fifth-largest cable provider and ninth-largest television provider in the United States. Throughout its existence and in its final years, Cablevision served customers residing in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and a small part of Pennsylvania. However, at one time it did provide service in many as 19 states. Cablevision also offered high-speed Internet connections (Optimum Online), digital cable (Optimum TV/IO Digital Cable), and VoIP (Optimum Voice) phone service (the eighth-largest telephone provider in the U.S.) through its Optimum brand name. Cablevision also offered a WiFi-only mobile phone service dubbed Freewheel.

On June 21, 2016, Cablevision was acquired by European telecom conglomerate Altice.

Channel 29 virtual TV stations in the United States

The following television stations operate on virtual channel 29 in the United States:

K11SZ-D in Oakridge, Oregon

K16LI-D in Port Orford, Oregon

K19CV-D in Redwood Falls, Minnesota

K19EC-D in Mapleton, Oregon

K20IR-D in Cottage Grove, Oregon

K20LL-D in Reedsport, Oregon

K21FS-D in Eugene, Oregon

K23KD-D in Coos Bay, etc., Oregon

K25LA-D in Fort Morgan, Colorado

K29HW-D in Austin, Texas

K29IF-D in Frost, Minnesota

K29IP-D in Corpus Christi, Texas

K29JB-D in Moses Lake, Washington

K29JD-D in Redding, California

K29JF-D in Rolla, Missouri

K30AF-D in Alexandria, Minnesota

K32HF-D in Florence, Oregon

K33KD-D in London Springs, Oregon

K33LZ-D in Myrtle Point, Oregon

K34JX-D in St. James, Minnesota

K50KK-D in Ellensburg, Washington

K51AL-D in Olivia, Minnesota

KABB in San Antonio, Texas

KBAK-TV in Bakersfield, California

KBJE-LD in Tyler, Texas

KCWE in Kansas City, Missouri

KDOS-LD in Globe, Arizona

KECA-LD in Eureka, California

KFJK-LD in Santa Fe, New Mexico

KGRQ-LD in Gila River Indian Community, Arizona

KGRY-LD in Gila River Indian Community, Arizona

KHNE-TV in Hastings, Nebraska

KHOG-TV in Fayetteville, Arkansas

KIMA-TV in Yakima, Washington

KMPX in Decatur, Texas

KNKC-LD in Lubbock, Texas

KQMM-CD in Santa Maria, California

KSGA-LD in San Bernardino, California

KSPX-TV in Sacramento, California

KTZT-CD in Tulsa, Oklahoma

KUPT in Hobbs, New Mexico

KVHP in Lake Charles, Louisiana

W22EX-D in Staunton, Virginia

W29CI-D in Salem, Illinois

W29DN-D in Athens, Georgia

W29DT-D in Tuscaloosa, Alabama

W29EG-D in Zanesville, Ohio

WAUR-LD in Ottawa, Illinois

WAZS-LD in North Charleston, South Carolina

WBIH in Selma, Alabama

WEDS-LD in Fort Walton, Florida

WEHG-LD in Wausau, Wisconsin

WFET-LD in Lewisburg, Tennessee

WFLX in West Palm Beach, Florida

WGTU in Traverse City, Michigan

WHVL-LD in State College, etc., Pennsylvania

WIVN-LD in Newcomerstown, Ohio

WKPD in Paducah, Kentucky

WKSO-TV in Somerset, Kentucky

WLPX-TV in Charleston, West Virginia

WMJN-LP in Somerville, Alabama

WMPN-TV in Jackson, Mississippi

WMUM-TV in Cochran, Georgia

WNTV in Greenville, South Carolina

WOMS-CD in Muskegon, Michigan

WRCF-CD in Orlando, Florida

WTMQ-LD in Jacksonville, North Carolina

WTMV-LD in Ogden, North Carolina

WTTK in Kokomo, Indiana

WTXF-TV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

WUHQ-LD in Grand Rapids, Michigan

WUTV in Buffalo, New York

WVIR-TV in Charlottesville, VirginiaThe following stations, which are no longer licensed, formerly operated on virtual channel 29:

KBKV-LD in Columbia, Missouri

WAOH-CD in Akron, Ohio

Channel 38 digital TV stations in the United States

The following television stations broadcast on digital channel 38 in the United States:

K38AD-D in Yuma, Colorado

K38AP-D in Memphis, Texas

K38AU-D in Tohatchi, New Mexico

K38BU-D in Gruver, Texas

K38CM-D in Parowan/Enoch, etc., Utah

K38DA-D in Aztec, New Mexico

K38DZ-D in Joplin, Montana

K38EK-D in Shoshoni, Wyoming

K38FO-D in Carbondale, Colorado

K38FP-D in Tucumcari, New Mexico

K38GF-D in Beaver, etc., Utah

K38GN-D in Randolph, Utah

K38GQ-D in Hatch, Utah

K38GR-D in Meadview, Arizona

K38HD-D in St. Louis, Missouri

K38IF-D in Elko, Nevada

K38IR-D in Lake Havasu City, Arizona

K38JP-D in Salinas, California

K38JS-D in Antimony, Utah

K38JT-D in Delta, etc., Utah

K38JX-D in Grand Junction, Colorado

K38KA-D in Koosharem, Utah

K38KB-D in Garrison, etc., Utah

K38KD-D in Woodland & Kamas, Utah

K38KF-D in Panguitch, Utah

K38KP-D in Orangeville, Utah

K38KS-D in East Price, Utah

K38KV-D in Hood River, Oregon

K38LD-D in Woody Creek, Colorado

K38LF-D in Tulia, Texas

K38LG-D in Clear Creek, Utah

K38LK-D in Jacks Cabin, Colorado

K38LR-D in Eureka, Nevada

K38LX-D in Golconda, Nevada

K38LZ-D in Longview, Washington

K38MC-D in Colstrip, Montana

K38MF-D in Duchesne, Utah

K38MG-D in Fillmore, etc., Utah

K38MI-D in Capitan, New Mexico

K38MK-D in Cheyenne Wells, Colorado

K38MM-D in International Falls, Minnesota

K38MQ-D in Leamington, Utah

K38MT-D in Manila, etc., Utah

K38MV-D in Fountain Green, Utah

K38MW-D in Torrey, etc., Utah

K38NR-D in Alexandria, Louisiana

K38OF-D in Crowley, Louisiana

K38OG-D in Leadore, Idaho

K38OH-D in Saint Cloud, Minnesota

K38PC-D in Overton, Nevada

KALO in Honolulu, Hawaii

KCMN-LD in Topeka, Kansas

KEET in Fortuna, California

KIAH in Houston, Texas

KIDK in Rexburg, Idaho

KJCS-LD in Colorado Springs, Colorado

KKEI-CD in Portland, Oregon

KMBH in Harlingen, Texas

KNDX-LD in Dickinson, North Dakota

KOMO-TV in Seattle, Washington

KPJR-TV in Greeley, Colorado

KPSP-CD in Cathedral City, California

KPXN-TV in San Bernardino, California

KRDK-TV in Valley City, North Dakota

KRON-TV in San Francisco, California

KSCC in Corpus Christi, Texas

KSEE in Fresno, California

KTXE-LD in San Angelo, Texas

KVDA in San Antonio, Texas

KVDO-LD in Albany, Oregon

KVFW-LD in Fort Worth, Texas

KXVO in Omaha, Nebraska

KYPK-LD in Yakima, Washington

W38DL-D in Adams, Massachusetts

W38EM-D in Albany, Georgia

W38ET-D in Eastlake, Ohio

WALM-LD in Sebring, Florida

WCFE-TV in Plattsburgh, New York

WDSS-LD in Syracuse, New York

WEAU in Eau Claire, Wisconsin

WEIJ-LD in Fort Wayne, Indiana

WEMT in Greeneville, Tennessee

WFKB-LD in Midland, Michigan

WFWG-LD in Crozet, Virginia

WGBO-DT in Joliet, Illinois

WGME-TV in Portland, Maine

WHCT-LD in Hartford, New Haven, Connecticut

WHDO-CD in Orlando, Florida

WHDT-LD in Boston, Massachusetts

WHTN in Murfreesboro, Tennessee

WIGL-LD in Athens, Georgia

WINP-TV in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

WJGN-CD in Chesapeake, Virginia

WKBW-TV in Buffalo, New York

WKMJ-TV in Louisville, Kentucky

WMAR-TV in Baltimore, Maryland

WMUB-LD in Warner Robins, Georgia

WMWD-LD in Madison, Wisconsin

WOSU-TV in Columbus, Ohio

WPSJ-CD in Hammonton, New Jersey

WQAD-TV in Moline, Illinois

WSFG-LD in Berry, Alabama

WSPF-CD in St. Petersburg, Florida

WSYM-TV in Lansing, Michigan

WTXF-TV in Allentown, Pennsylvania

WUFX-LD in Tallahassee, Florida

WUVC-DT in Fayetteville, North Carolina

WWXY-LD in San Juan, Puerto RicoThe following stations, which are no longer licensed, formerly broadcast on digital channel 38:

K38KZ-D in Bovina, etc., Texas

K38OR-D in Jonesboro, Arkansas

KZMD-LD in Lufkin, Texas

W38FI-D in Laurel, Mississippi

Channel 38 low-power TV stations in the United States

The following low-power television stations broadcast on digital or analog channel 38 in the United States:

K29LN-D in Santa Rosa, New Mexico

K38AD-D in Yuma, Colorado

K38AP-D in Memphis, Texas

K38AU-D in Tohatchi, New Mexico

K38BU-D in Gruver, Texas

K38CM-D in Parowan/Enoch, etc., Utah

K38CX in Shonto, Arizona

K38DA-D in Aztec, New Mexico

K38DZ-D in Joplin, Montana

K38EK-D in Shoshoni, Wyoming

K38FO-D in Carbondale, Colorado

K38FP-D in Tucumcari, New Mexico

K38FQ in Anderson/Central Val, California

K38FW in Stateline, Nevada

K38GF-D in Beaver, etc., Utah

K38GN-D in Randolph, Utah

K38GO in Roosevelt, Utah

K38GQ-D in Hatch, Utah

K38GR-D in Meadview, Arizona

K38HD-D in St. Louis, Missouri

K38HU in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

K38IF-D in Elko, Nevada

K38IM in Albuquerque, New Mexico

K38IO in De Leon, Texas

K38IR-D in Lake Havasu City, Arizona

K38JP-D in Salinas, California

K38JS-D in Antimony, Utah

K38JT-D in Delta, etc., Utah

K38JX-D in Grand Junction, Colorado

K38KA-D in Koosharem, Utah

K38KB-D in Garrison, etc., Utah

K38KD-D in Woodland & Kamas, Utah

K38KF-D in Panguitch, Utah

K38KP-D in Orangeville, Utah

K38KS-D in East Price, Utah

K38KV-D in Hood River, Oregon

K38LD-D in Woody Creek, Colorado

K38LF-D in Tulia, Texas

K38LG-D in Clear Creek, Utah

K38LK-D in Jacks Cabin, Colorado

K38LR-D in Eureka, Nevada

K38LX-D in Golconda, Nevada

K38LZ-D in Longview, Washington

K38MC-D in Colstrip, Montana

K38MF-D in Duchesne, Utah

K38MG-D in Fillmore, etc., Utah

K38MI-D in Capitan, New Mexico

K38MK-D in Cheyenne Wells, Colorado

K38MM-D in International Falls, Minnesota

K38MQ-D in Leamington, Utah

K38MT-D in Manila, etc., Utah

K38MV-D in Fountain Green, Utah

K38MW-D in Torrey, etc., Utah

K38NR-D in Alexandria, Louisiana

K38OF-D in Crowley, Louisiana

K38OG-D in Leadore, Idaho

K38OH-D in Saint Cloud, Minnesota

K38PC-D in Overton, Nevada

KACN-LP in Anchorage, Alaska

KCJY-LP in Twin Falls, Idaho

KCMN-LD in Topeka, Kansas

KEET in Fortuna, California

KIDK in Rexburg, Idaho

KJCS-LD in Colorado Springs, Colorado

KKEI-CD in Portland, Oregon

KNDX-LD in Dickinson, North Dakota

KNXT-LP in Bakersfield, California

KPSP-CD in Cathedral City, California

KSCD-LP in Big Bear Lake, California

KTXE-LD in San Angelo, Texas

KVDO-LD in Albany, Oregon

KVFW-LD in Fort Worth, Texas

KXND-LP in Williston, North Dakota

KYPK-LD in Yakima, Washington

W38CB in Littleton, New Hampshire

W38DL-D in Adams, Massachusetts

W38EM-D in Albany, Georgia

W38ET-D in Eastlake, Ohio

WALM-LD in Sebring, Florida

WAMS-LP in Lima, Ohio

WBMG-LP in Moody, Alabama

WDMY-LP in Toledo, Ohio

WDSS-LD in Syracuse, New York

WEIJ-LD in Fort Wayne, Indiana

WFKB-LD in Midland, Michigan

WFWG-LD in Crozet, Virginia

WHCT-LD in Hartford/New Haven, Connecticut

WHDO-CD in Orlando, Florida

WHDT-LD in Boston, Massachusetts

WIGL-LD in Athens, Georgia

WJGN-CD in Chesapeake, Virginia

WMUB-LD in Warner Robins, Georgia

WMWD-LD in Madison, Wisconsin

WNGN-LP in Troy, New York

WPSJ-CD in Hammonton, New Jersey

WSFG-LD in Berry, Alabama

WSPF-CD in St. Petersburg, Florida

WTSJ-LP in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

WTXF-TV in Allentown, Pennsylvania

WUFX-LD in Tallahassee, Florida

WWXY-LD in San Juan, Puerto RicoThe following stations, which are no longer licensed, formerly broadcast on digital or analog channel 38:

K38EL in Fairbanks, Alaska

K38GP in Green River, Utah

K38HV in Samak, Utah

K38IT in Stemilt, etc., Washington

K38JD in Durango, Colorado

K38KZ-D in Bovina, etc., Texas

K38OR-D in Jonesboro, Arkansas

KHOH-LP in Hilo, Hawaii

KJCP-LP in Pago Pago, American Samoa

KPAL-LP in Palmdale, California

KVSW-LP in Winslow, Arizona

KZMD-LD in Lufkin, Texas

W38BN in Salisbury, Maryland

W38FI-D in Laurel, Mississippi

WGCW-LP in Savannah, Georgia

WHCT-LP in Hartford, Connecticut

Channel 42 digital TV stations in the United States

The following television stations broadcast on digital channel 42 in the United States:

K42AF-D in Parowan/Enoch, etc., Utah

K42AL-D in Memphis, Texas

K42CF-D in Gruver, Texas

K42CH-D in Capulin, etc., New Mexico

K42CM-D in Centralia/Chehalis, Washington

K42CP-D in Peach Springs, Arizona

K42CQ-D in Chloride, Arizona

K42CR-D in Tucumcari, New Mexico

K42DI-D in Bayfield & Ignacio, Colorado

K42DZ-D in Battle Mountain, Nevada

K42EA-D in Lamar, Colorado

K42EU-D in Topock, Arizona

K42EV-D in Glenwood Springs, Colorado

K42EX-D in Beaver, etc., Utah

K42EY-D in Alamogordo, New Mexico

K42FE-D in Shreveport, Louisiana

K42FI-D in Watertown, South Dakota

K42GI-D in Yuma, Colorado

K42GN-D in Preston, Idaho

K42GT-D in Priest Lake, Idaho

K42HL-D in Oroville, California

K42HP-D in Green River, Utah

K42HQ-D in Delta/Oak City, etc., Utah

K42HS-D in Henrieville, Utah

K42HT-D in Laketown, etc., Utah

K42HV-D in East Price, Utah

K42HY-D in Rawlins, Wyoming

K42ID-D in La Veta, Colorado

K42IH-D in East Wenatchee, Washington

K42IK-D in Tohatchi, New Mexico

K42IM-D in Minot, North Dakota

K42IQ-D in Flagstaff, Arizona

K42IU-D in Clear Creek, Utah

K42IV-D in Scipio, Utah

K42IX-D in Antimony, Utah

K42IY-D in Fountain Green, Utah

K42JB-D in Wyola, Montana

K42JQ-D in Redding, California

K42JS-D in Fallon, Nevada

K42JT-D in Roosevelt, etc., Utah

K42JU-D in Bicknell, etc., Utah

K42JW-D in Leamington, Utah

K42JX-D in Salmon, Idaho

K42KD-D in Kanarraville, etc., Utah

K42KG-D in Fillmore, etc., Utah

K42KW-D in McDermitt, Nevada

K42KY-D in Fruitland, Utah

K42KZ-D in Calexico, California

KAXT-CD in San Francisco-San Jose, California

KBZC-LD in Enid, Oklahoma

KCDL-LD in Nampa, Idaho

KDBZ-CD in Bozeman, Montana

KESQ-TV in Palm Springs, California

KGLA-DT in Hammond, Louisiana

KLNM-LD in Lufkin, Texas

KMSX-LD in Sacramento, California

KNPB in Truckee/Lake Tahoe, California

KOAA-TV in Pueblo, Colorado

KPXD-TV in Arlington, Texas

KPXG-LD in Portland, Oregon

KSAX in Alexandria, Minnesota

KSBO-CD in San Luis Obispo, California

KSHB-TV in Kansas City, Missouri

KSYS in Jacksonville, Oregon

KTFD-TV in Albuquerque, New Mexico

KUED in Salt Lake City, Utah

KVHF-LD in Fresno, California

KWDK in Tacoma, Washington

KWHY-TV in Los Angeles, California

KZGN-LD in Ridgecrest, California

W42AX-D in Bakersville, North Carolina

W42DF-D in Cashiers, North Carolina

W42DG-D in State College, Pennsylvania

W42DH-D in Sayner/Vilas County, Wisconsin

W42DJ-D in Ocala, Florida

W42DR-D in Marion, North Carolina

W42DU-D in La Grange, Georgia

W42DZ-D in Adjuntas, Puerto Rico

W42EB-D in Syracuse, New York

W42EM-D in Mount Vernon, Illinois

WAKA in Selma, Alabama

WBOC-LD in Georgetown, Delaware

WCLJ-TV in Bloomington, Indiana

WCVE-TV in Richmond, Virginia

WFLI-TV in Cleveland, Tennessee

WGGN-TV in Sandusky, Ohio

WHDH in Boston, Massachusetts

WHDT in Stuart, Florida

WHSV-TV in Harrisonburg, Virginia

WICS in Springfield, Illinois

WJBF in Augusta, Georgia

WJXT in Jacksonville, Florida

WKLE in Lexington, Kentucky

WKMA-TV in Madisonville, Kentucky

WLLC-LP in Nashville, Tennessee

WMPT in Annapolis, Maryland

WNDU-TV in South Bend, Indiana

WNGX-LD in Schenectady, New York

WNIB-LD in Rochester, New York

WPNT in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

WQRF-TV in Rockford, Illinois

WRAY-TV in Wilson, North Carolina

WSKG-TV in Binghamton, New York

WTHC-LD in Atlanta, Georgia

WTXF-TV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

WXPX-TV in Bradenton, Florida

WZME in Bridgeport, ConnecticutThe following stations, which are no longer licensed, formerly broadcast on digital channel 42:

K42KR-D in Mountain View, Wyoming

K42LH-D in Winston, Oregon

KIDZ-LD in Abilene, Texas

KSEX-CD in San Diego, California

WMSY-TV in Marion, Virginia

Chasing News

Chasing News with Bill Spadea (formerly Chasing New Jersey and Chasing News) is a news and talk show program broadcast by WWOR-TV, a MyNetworkTV O&O based in Secaucus, New Jersey and serving New York City, and sister to Fox flagship station WNYW-TV. The program airs nightly at 11 PM on WWOR and is rerun on WNYW and its sister station, WTXF-TV.

Premiering on July 8, 2013, the program replaced the more conventional newscasts that were previously broadcast by the station. The program featured various segments and stories focusing on headlines and issues affecting the New Jersey area, featuring reports by a group of correspondents known as "chasers".

The program was met with mixed reception upon its premiere for its visually intensive and tabloid-like format, but was praised for how it targeted younger viewers through social engagement. However, the closure of WWOR's news department as part of the changes led to concerns from politicians over whether Fox Television Stations was still in compliance with a mandate to provide news programming for the New Jersey area.

Chris Cimino

Chris Cimino was the meteorologist on WNBC television's early-morning news program, Today in New York in New York City, New York, and was a substitute meteorologist for the NBC network's Today program.

He joined WNBC in December 1995 from WTXF-TV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he was the weekend meteorologist since January 1995. Before that, Cimino worked as a meteorologist in the Cincinnati, Ohio, television market and on the radio with Compu-Weather and Metro Weather Service. and WROC-TV in Rochester, New York.

On September 20, 2004, Cimino was part of an incident in which he had to give a weather report dressed in a New York Yankees baseball costume (he is a lifelong New York Mets baseball fan). The idea came after Cimino lost a bet to his eleven-year-old neighbor in which the Mets would have to win at least seventy-five games; the Mets were unsuccessful. The report ended with Cimino's colleague, sportscaster Otis Livingston, interrupting while dressed as the Mr. Met mascot, "beating up" Cimino.

During his time at WNBC he filled in for Al Roker on the Today Show, His quote to go to the local weather update was, "That was the look of the National Weather, Now here is your Local Forecast."

Cimino is a resident of East Brunswick Township, New Jersey.His final day at WNBC was July 2, 2019. His replacement, Maria LaRosa started on July 29, 2019.

Clayton Morris

Clayton Morris (born December 31, 1976) is an American real estate investor and host of the Investing in Real Estate podcast.

He is a former co-host of The Daily Buzz and Good Day Philadelphia on Fox's WTXF-TV who moved to co-host Fox & Friends on Fox News Channel in 2009. He covered consumer technology for Fox and hosted weekly technology segments for Fox News Radio and Fox News. On September 4, 2017, he left Fox News.Morris was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and attended Wilson High School in Spring Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania (today West Lawn, Pennsylvania). He graduated with a bachelor's degree from the University of Pittsburgh in 1999. He was a frequent guest-panelist on the Fox News late-night satire show, Red Eye w/ Greg Gutfeld.

Dawn Stensland-Mendte

Dawn Stensland Mendte (born June 15, 1964) is an American television talk show host and news anchor working at WMCN in Philadelphia. Stensland-Mendte was also host of CBS Saturday Morning. Stensland-Mendte has anchored the news at several TV stations across the country including WBBM-TV in Chicago, KYW-TV and WTXF-TV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and WKYC-TV in Cleveland, Ohio.

Garry Cobb

Garry Wilbert Cobb (born March 16, 1957 in Carthage, North Carolina) is a former American football linebacker in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Detroit Lions,and Philadelphia Eagles. He played college football at the University of Southern California. He is currently Philadelphia Eagles analyst for Fox affiliate WTXF-TV was the Republican nominee for Congress in the House election for New Jersey's 1st congressional district.

Howard Eskin

Howard Eskin (born April 29, 1951) is a sports anchor at WTXF-TV "Fox 29" in Philadelphia, an American sports radio personality for WIP-FM 94.1/WTEL AM 610, father of Brett "Spike" Eskin, Program Director for 94 WIP.

Larry Ceisler

Larry Ceisler is a prominent public relations manager in Pennsylvania, where he is the principal of Ceisler Media & Issue Advocacy.

A native of Washington, Pennsylvania, he is a graduate of American University and Duquesne University School of Law.He worked as a news producer for KDKA-TV in Pittsburgh and was transferred to KYW-TV in Philadelphia in 1983. In 1986, he left the news business to work as a Deputy Campaign Manager for Philadelphia Mayor Wilson Goode. He then joined the Wilson administration as Special Assistant for Governmental Relations and Special Counsel for the Commerce Department.He worked as a political analyst for WTXF-TV in Philadelphia from 1999 through 2005. He is also a regular political commentator on KYW-TV, CN8, and the Michael Smerconish Show on WPHT.He testified in federal court as an expert witness in politics and testified against the GOP-created Pennsylvania redistricting plan.In 2010, Politics Magazine named him one of the most influential Democrats in Pennsylvania.In 2003, Larry Ceisler and Jeff Jubelirer formed the media advocacy firm Ceisler Jubelirer, LLC. Then in 2010 the name changed to Ceisler Media & Issue Advocacy when Jubelirer went on to pursue other avenues.

In 2015, it was announced that Ceisler Media and Issue Advocacy received a contract from the State of Israel. The agreement was a $90,000 test project to help Israel's image in the United States.

Lauren Cohn

Lauren Cohn is a radio host at WLS in Chicago.

Cohn previously worked as a morning anchor at WLS-TV in Chicago in 1993. She later moved to be an Anchor/general assignment reporter at WBBM-TV in 1998. Then, she worked for WFLD as a general assignment and health reporter. In February 2004, she moved to WCAU-TV in Philadelphia where she worked as an anchor/reporter until March 2007. While with WCAU she was nominated for the Best Anchor Emmy in 2004 and 2005. Then she moved back to Chicago to anchor the 10pm Newscast at Fox News Chicago. On August 30, 2010 it was announced that she would be joining WTXF-TV in Philadelphia as the main anchor. She left WTXF in January 2013.

Cohn co-hosted with John Kass 9-11am weekdays at WLSAM890.

After Kass/Cohn's radio show ended on Thursday, February 26, 2015, they were both shown the door in yet another WLS programming shakeup, according to blogger Robert Feder. Cohn will be given the opportunity to audition as a possible cohost with morning show host John Howell. Cohn began appearing alongside Howell during the week of March 2, 2015. Meanwhile it was announced the same day that Chicago radio personality Jonathan Brandmeier was hired by WLS, headed to the former Kass/Cohn timeslot. Further details were to be announced later.

List of Fox television affiliates (by U.S. state)

The Fox Broadcasting Company (Fox) is an American broadcast television television network owned by Fox Corporation which was launched in October 1986. As of March 2019, the network currently has 17 owned-and-operated stations, and current affiliation agreements with 225 other television stations.This article is a listing of current Fox affiliates in the continental United States and U.S. possessions (including subchannel affiliates, satellite stations and select low-power translators), arranged alphabetically by state, and based on the station's city of license and followed in parentheses by the Designated Market Area if it differs from the city of license. Also included is a listing of Fox-branded cable channels outside the United States. There are links to and articles on each of the broadcast stations and international channels, describing their histories, local programming and technical information, such as broadcast frequencies.

The station's advertised channel number follows the call letters. In most cases, this is their virtual channel (PSIP) number.

Stations listed in boldface are owned and operated by Fox through its subsidiary Fox Television Stations (excluding owned-and-operated stations of MyNetworkTV, unless the station simulcasts a co-owned Fox O&O station via a digital subchannel).

List of television stations in Pennsylvania

This is a list of broadcast television stations serving cities in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania.

Media in Philadelphia

This is a list of media based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.

Paramount Stations Group

Paramount Stations Group (sometimes abbreviated as PSG) was a company that controlled a group of American broadcast television stations. The company existed from 1991 until 2001.

SallyAnn Mosey

SallyAnn Mosey is a reporter fill in anchor and weekend meteorologist for News 12 New Jersey. She was a meteorologist for the FOX owned-and-operated television station WTXF-TV in Philadelphia. Mosey served as meteorologist on the station’s popular weekday morning show Good Day Philadelphia from 4:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., as well as weekday mornings on Fox 29 News at Eleven from October 2011 until December 2011. Mosey was free-lancing at the station during that station's search for a meteorologist. She made her final broadcast for WTXF on February 29, 2012. She has also presented feature stories on a wide variety of family life issues and topics in-studio and in the field for Good Day Prior to joining WTXF in 2009, Mosey was a meteorologist at the NBC flagship station, WNBC-TV, in New York City on Weekend Today in New York, where she reported in-studio as well as traveling the metropolitan area for three years, broadcasting live features and weather forecasts from the most popular events in the region.

Before moving to New York, Mosey was the weekend weathercaster and a reporter for WPVI-TV in Philadelphia for eight years. Previously, she had been weekday weather anchor and reporter at WTNH-TV in New Haven, Connecticut, where she earned an Emmy Award nomination for general news reporting. She started her television career in her native Buffalo, New York with WGRZ-TV.

WCAU

WCAU, virtual channel 10 (UHF digital channel 28), is an NBC owned-and-operated television station licensed to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. The station is owned by the NBC Owned Television Stations subsidiary of NBCUniversal, as part of a duopoly with Mount Laurel, New Jersey-licensed Telemundo owned-and-operated station WWSI (channel 62); NBCUniversal, a subsidiary of locally based media firm Comcast, owns both networks, along with regional sports network NBC Sports Philadelphia. WCAU and WWSI share studios within the Comcast Technology Center on Arch Street in Center City, with some operations remaining at their former main studio at the corner of City Avenue and Monument Road in Bala Cynwyd, along the Philadelphia–Montgomery county line. The two stations also share transmitter facilities in the Roxborough section of Philadelphia.

Local stations
Outlying stations
Cable channels
Defunct stations
Fox network affiliates in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Broadcast television stations by affiliation licensed to and serving the state of New Jersey
ABC affiliates
CBS affiliates
Fox affiliates
NBC affiliates
CW affiliates
MyNetworkTV affiliates
Ion affiliates
PBS member stations
Spanish-language
stations
Other stations
Defunct
Broadcast television stations by affiliation licensed to and serving the state of Delaware
ABC affiliates
CBS affiliates
Fox affiliates
NBC affiliates
CW affiliates
MyNetworkTV affiliates
Ion affiliates
PBS member stations
Telemundo affilates
Other stations
Corporate directors
Disney–ABC
CBS Corp.
Fox Corp.
NBCU
Univision
Comm.

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