WAPL

WAPL (105.7 FM) is a classic rock formatted radio station licensed to Appleton, Wisconsin, that serves the Green Bay and Appleton-Oshkosh areas. The station is owned by Woodward Communications, and has studios on College Avenue in Appleton, with transmitting facilities located near the WGBA Tower west of unincorporated Shirley in the Town of Glenmore in southeastern Brown County.

WAPL
WAPL logo
CityAppleton, Wisconsin
Broadcast areaGreen Bay-Appleton-Oshkosh
Branding105.7 WAPL
SloganWisconsin's Rock Station
Frequency105.7 MHz
First air dateDecember 24, 1965 (as WAPL-FM)
FormatClassic Rock
ERP100,000 watts
HAAT358 meters (1175 feet)
ClassC
Facility ID73659
Transmitter coordinates44°21′32″N 87°59′07″W / 44.35889°N 87.98528°W
Callsign meaningW APpLeton (city of license; taken from WAPL-AM)
Former callsignsWAPL-FM (1963-1977)
WCXR (1977)
WAPL-FM (1977-2008)
OwnerWoodward Communications, Inc.
Sister stationsWHBY, WKSZ, WKZG, WKZY, WSCO, WZOR
WebcastListen Live
Websitewapl.com

Beginnings

WAPL radio made its on-air debut in 1952 operating on a frequency of 1570 AM under the ownership of the Bartell family. It was the third AM station in the market, but the first to serve the younger audience with rock & roll music.

WAPL-FM, operating on a frequency of 105.7 FM was added in 1965 when an FM antenna was installed on the existing WAPL (AM) tower in Menasha. The initial power was around 20,000 watts at an antenna height of 160 feet. The station's format was "beautiful music".

In 1965, WAPL-FM was upgraded to a 50,000 watt signal at 200 feet with a new tower on The Zuelke Building in downtown Appleton.

By 1977, having gone through a number of ownership and format changes, WAPL-FM changed its call letters to WCXR and briefly became a Christian station. This change lasted only eight months before changing format again, this time to album rock. Shortly thereafter, the station's call letters reverted to WAPL-FM. The on-air line up included Laura Morgan, Dan Adams and program director Steve Brown.

The Rockin' Apple

WoodwardStudios Appleton WHBY WZOR WAPL WECB
Studios

In 1978, WAPL AM and FM were offered for sale. WAPL-FM was purchased by Woodward Communications, Inc., of Dubuque, Iowa. Woodward already owned an AM station, WHBY, in the Appleton market. A strategy was developed to include the newly purchased station in the already planned new facility for WHBY on Appleton's southeast side. The plans included an upgrade of WAPL's signal to 100,000 watts of power and 450 feet of height for the antenna.

The new facilities were completed in the early fall of 1979, and WAPL and its new sister station, WHBY, won the Broadcast Management and Engineering award for "Best AM/FM Station" of 1979. Soon after the construction was complete, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) ruled that high power FM station like WAPL should be at least 100,000 watts at 1000 feet. Immediately, the planning began for a new transmitter site which would allow WAPL to remain a Class C FM transmitting facility. During this time, most of the WAPL air staff went by only their first names and was composed of Robin, Dale, Cliff, Carl King, Laura Morgan, Mark Coulter and Operations Manager Dan Davis.

In October 1980, WAPL-FM began identifying itself as The Rockin' Apple, under program director Wayne Shayne. WAPL would continue to use the nickname until 2002, at which time the station was re-branded as "Wisconsin's Rock Station". The Rockin' Apple was brought back as a station identifier in 2007 as preparations were being made for WAPL's 30th Anniversary celebration. In addition to Shayne, other members of the air staff during WAPL's history have included Rick Panneck, David Lee (DJ), Laura Morgan, Bob Baron, Rick Blades, and Nate Wright (Night Nate).

In April 1985, "The Mark and McNeal Morning Show" debuted with Mark Coulter, Rick McNeal and newsman Len Nelson. While Coulter departed after only eight months, McNeal and Nelson continued doing the morning show together until January 1999, when Nelson left the station to become news director of WGEE (now WTAQ) and was replaced by John Jordan. McNeal and Jordan would continue on the "Rockin' Apple Morning Show" until April 2002, when WAPL management dropped the show in favor of "Bob and Brian," a show originating from Milwaukee's WLZR (now WHQG). "Bob and Brian" aired on WAPL until March 2003. The syndicated show was a bust with Rockin' Apple listeners, causing WAPL to drop it in favor of a local, music-intensive morning shift. ("Bob and Brian" would eventually resurface in The Fox Cities radio market on WWWX-FM.) In September 2003, WAPL reunited Rick McNeal and Len Nelson at their 25th Anniversary Celebration and announced that they would return to the station to once again helm the morning show.

WAPL received a construction permit August 27, 1987 to increase tower height and become a full Class C FM, nearly eight years after applying for it. The new transmitting facility was completed southeast of Green Bay in rural Shirley at a height of 1,175 feet above average terrain near WGBA-TV's transmitter, making the station "The 100,000 Watt Blowtorch of the Midwest". The signal easily reaches the northern portions of the Milwaukee market, though a translator activated in 2015 broadcasting Milwaukee's AM sports station WSSP, also carried on 105.7, has removed some access to WAPL in that market.

Awards

In 1990, under Program Director Garrett Hart, WAPL-FM was chosen "Best Radio Station" by the readers of Rolling Stone Magazine. The award was the first of five such awards won by the staff of The Rockin' Apple. The station's line-up includes Hart, Nelson and McNeal, Baron, Tony Scott, Jeannie Wilde, Shane Reno, Dave Wayne, Sharon Hunter, Chris Dare and Bob Crew.

After being the runner-up in 1991, WAPL would again win the "Best Radio Station" award from the readers of Rolling Stone in 1992, followed by a third award in four years in 1993. Joining Hart, Nelson, McNeal, Baron, Wilde, Scott and Crew were Miles Walker, Karla Moore, Andy Hammer and Linda Shane. The Rockin' Apple repeated yet again in 1994 and 1995, with an airstaff including Pete Burns, Susan Currie, Ross Maxwell, Roxanne Steele, Randy Hawke, Jamie Powers and Bill Kidd. Rolling Stone discontinued the "Best Radio Station" category from it annual Readers' Poll the following year.

After replacing longtime WAPL Program Director Garrett Hart in 1997, new PD Randy Hawke led WAPL to a win as Radio and Records "Best Small Market Rock Radio Station" in 1999. At that time, the airstaff included Rick McNeal and John Jordan in mornings, Hawke, Roxanne Steele, Ross Maxwell, Pete Burns, Scott Stevens, Rex Charger, and Desiree.

In 2006, under Program Director Joe Calgaro, 105.7 WAPL was selected as one of five finalists for the Marconi Award for National Rock Radio Station of the Year. The Marconis, presented by the National Association of Broadcasters are considered the Oscars of the radio industry.

Nominated again in 2008, this time WAPL brought home the Marconi Award for National Rock Station of the Year. The Staff included Program Director Joe Calgaro, Promotions Director Elwood, and Music Director Borna Velic. The on-air line-up was as follows: Rick McNeal, Len Nelson, and Jeanne Anthony of The Rick & Len Show, Karla Moore, Elwood, Joe Calgaro, Scott Stevens, and Ross Maxwell. WAPL won the 2010 Radio Station of the Year award at the Wisconsin Area Music Industry (WAMI) awards.[1]

In May 2011, WAPL was named the first ever Medium Market Music Station of the Year by the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association.[2] The air-staff included Rick and Len in the morning, Roxanne Steele, Elwood, Joe Calgaro and John Jordan in the afternoon, Scott Stevens, Borna Velic, and Ross Maxwell.

In September 2011, WAPL again won the National Association of Broadcaster's Marconi Award for National Rock Station of the Year. It was the second time WAPL received the award in 3 years.

In May 2012, WAPL was named Medium Market Music Station of the Year for the second consecutive year by the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association. The air-staff included Rick and Len in the morning, Roxanne Steele, Elwood, Joe Calgaro and John Jordan in the afternoon, Scott Stevens, Borna Velic, and Ross Maxwell.

WAPL today

The Rockin' Apple celebrated its 30th Anniversary in 2008. WAPL was recognized by the American Red Cross in 2002 as Outstanding Media Partner for their fund raising efforts following the September 11 attacks in 2001. In addition to being a national Marconi Award finalist in 2006, WAPL has won numerous Wisconsin Area Music Industry Awards and was nominated for 2008 Station of the Year. WAPL remains radio-active in the community through charitable campaigns such as Rock Against Hunger, Rock For Kids, and Rock For The Cure. They partner annually with the Leukemia-Lymphoma Society, American Cancer Society, Children's Hospital, Paul's Pantry, and area domestic abuse shelters in raising nearly a million dollars for local charities. The current WAPL line-up includes The Rick and Len Show with news anchor Erin Davisson, The Steele Rockers Union with Roxanne Steele, The Liquid Lunch with Ross Maxwell, The Afternoon Road Show with Elwood and John Jordan, Tim "The Hitman" Hart, Home Brewed, House of Hair with Dee Snider, Nights with Alice Cooper, and Rockline with Bob Coburn.

In 2002, 105.7 FM and AM 1570 once again became sister stations. WAPL owner Woodward Communications, Inc. purchased 1570 WRJQ and immediately changed the call letters to WSCO and installed a Sports Talk format, replacing WRJQ's Big Band format. In addition to WHBY and WSCO, WAPL's other sister stations include:

In 2005, WAPL began using its previous slogan "The Rockin' Apple", after being positioned as "Wisconsin's Rock Station" since 2002.

In late 2007, WAPL began streaming their radio broadcast online via the World Wide Web.

On April 8, 2008, the station's official call letters were changed by the FCC from WAPL-FM to simply WAPL.[3]

In the 2009 NFL season, the station began to carry Green Bay Packers radio broadcasts, sharing rights with WHBY, and markets itself as "Your FM Home of the Green Bay Packers", giving Green Bay/Fox Cities listeners three choices to listen to the games via FM, including Midwest Communications's WTAQ (1360/97.5), which came to FM in 2010, and WIXX (101.1). Technically, however, WAPL is considered only the network's Appleton/Fox Cities FM affiliate, and not a primary station in the Packers Radio Network (as WTAQ and WIXX are) despite its equivalent signal. This had a consequence of forcing WAPL to carry the Westwood One national call instead of Packers Radio Network coverage for the 2011 NFC Championship Game and Super Bowl XLV, leaving listeners to WTAQ and WIXX for the local call of both games.

Birth gift to Prince William

WAPL shares its "initials" with Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, the heir to the British throne, whose full name is William Arthur Philip Louis. Upon the birth of the future king in June 1982, WAPL sent gifts to Buckingham Palace. The story was reported in papers and radio broadcasts in the US, Canada, Australia and throughout the United Kingdom. WAPL received a note of thanks from Prince Charles and Princess Diana that informed them that the Royal Family is not allowed to accept gifts but that the items would be donated to charity.

References

  1. ^ "First time event held outside Milwaukee". The Post Crescent. April 13, 2010. pp. A-3, A-6.
  2. ^ 2010 Wisconsin Broadcasters Association Awards For Excellence
  3. ^ "Call Sign History". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access Database.

External links

David Lee (DJ)

David Lee (born David Wayne Olejniczak on May 13, 1961) was a professional DJ, and is now a professional voiceover announcer, known for his ominous, gravely tone of voice. During his career, which began in 1977, he has worked with such affiliates as Westwood One, Live Nation, NBC, and WRIF/Detroit. He has served as imaging voice for over 50 radio stations worldwide and DJ'd for 4 stations in Wisconsin. He attended high school at Premontre (now Notre Dame), a private high school in Green Bay, WI. There, he got his first taste of broadcasting along with fellow schoolmate Kevin Harlan at the school's own radio station. He attended the Trans-American School of Broadcasting.

After working as a DJ for WGBP/Green Bay, he moved to his first professional radio job in 1980 at WKAU/Kaukauna. After working there for one year, he got a job at WAPL/Appleton. From there, he moved to WQFM/Milwaukee where he hosted his own radio show which included guest appearances from David Lee Roth (Which made up the David Lee, and David Lee Special), Jay Leno, and David Crosby. During his time at QFM he also introduced local bands at local clubs, and national acts at both the Alpine Valley Music Theater, and the Marcus Amphitheater. He made one appearance on the Milwaukee station WLZR for his "Farewell to Milwaukee" show.

In the summer of 1992, David made a major turn in his career when he moved from Milwaukee to Detroit. He then was employed by the radio station WRIF/Detroit. There he worked as both the production director and station imaging voice. He was Production Director of WRIF in Detroit from 1992 through 1995.

He is currently the imaging voice for the NFL on the Dial Global radio network. He has done promo voice work for CBS, NBC

& Cartoon Network & is also the imaging voice of many U.S. radio station.

Dumatubin Airport

Dumatubun Airport is an airport in Langgur, Kai Islands, in the Maluku province of Indonesia. The airport was closed on 19 December 2014 as all flights were moved to the new Karel Sadsuitubun Airport.

Establishment of sister chromatid cohesion

Sister chromatid cohesion refers to the process by which sister chromatids are paired and held together during certain phases of the cell cycle. Establishment of sister chromatid cohesion is the process by which chromatin-associated cohesin protein becomes competent to physically bind together the sister chromatids. In general, cohesion is established during S phase as DNA is replicated, and is lost when chromosomes segregate during mitosis and meiosis. Some studies have suggested that cohesion aids in aligning the kinetochores during mitosis by forcing the kinetochores to face opposite cell poles.

Frank Caliendo

Frank Caliendo (born January 19, 1974) is an American comedian and impressionist, best known for his Jon Gruden impersonation on the Fox Network television series MADtv, and as the in-house prognosticator for Fox NFL Sunday. Furthermore, he was an addition to the Pardon My Take Podcast broadcast by genius at Barstool Sports in 2019. In 2007 and 2008, he performed his impersonations on his own show, Frank TV, which aired on TBS. He is known for his impressions and for his frequent appearances on The Bob & Tom Show. He has released six solo CDs. From 2009 to 2011 he had a show at the Monte Carlo Resort and Casino in Las Vegas.

Mark Britten

Mark Britten is an American comedian from Arlington, Texas, whose chosen stage name is "The Chinaman". Born of a Chinese-American mother and a Caucasian father, his act employs material from his "dysfunctional background" and skews ethnic stereotypes of all kinds. He has been a performing stand-up comic for ten years, and is known for his voice impersonations, parodies of rock singers and other vocalists and biting anecdotes about the foibles of ethnic and cultural stereotypes. The Austin Chronicle describes him as "a rock star trapped in a comic’s body." He is a member of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists.

Mina Harigae

Mina Harigae (born November 1, 1989) is an American professional golfer currently playing on the LPGA Tour.

As an amateur golfer, she won the 2007 U.S. Women's Amateur Public Links. Harigae won the California Women's Amateur Championship for four consecutive years (2001–2005); her first victory came as a 12-year-old.

Packers Radio Network

The Packers Radio Network is a broadcast radio network and the official radio broadcaster of the Green Bay Packers football team. The network's flagship is the Good Karma Brands's WTMJ in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which has broadcast the games since November 24, 1929, and was the former flagship station of Journal Communications until the E. W. Scripps Company and Journal completed their broadcast merger and publishing spin-off on April 1, 2015 (Good Karma took over WTMJ's operations on November 1, 2018 upon Scripps' second withdrawal from radio). This is one of the few arrangements where a team's flagship radio station is not based in their home market and the local station serves as a network affiliate only, as WTMJ's signal to Green Bay and most of Wisconsin's population centers is city-grade; the rights for Packers games in the Green Bay area have bounced between Midwest Communications and Cumulus Media throughout the last few years, while stations carrying the games owned by Woodward Communications which nominally serve the Fox Cities exclusively have equally heavy listenership in Green Bay.

An internal Part 15 radio station featuring the Packers Radio Network play-by-play, along with public address and scoreboard announcements, serves the area surrounding Lambeau Field during Packers home games to provide the game call to those in attendance without the delay experienced by the uploading of the network feed via satellite. The feed is on a non-standard FM frequency which requires purchase of a special radio tuner from the team's pro shop to listen to that signal clearly, though it is audible with cross-channel interference from Wisconsin Public Radio's WPNE at 87.5 FM on regular tuners.

The Green Bay stations designated below in the table are considered additional "primary" stations in the network. This designation only truly comes to use in the later stages of the NFL Playoffs if the Packers make it to the NFC Championship Game and the Super Bowl, where those primary stations can carry the Packers Radio Network local call. All other network stations, including those licensed to communities in the Fox Cities, must carry the national Westwood One call instead in line with NFL rules.

In situations where Milwaukee Brewers baseball playoff games conflict with Packers games (WTMJ and Good Karma Brands also originate that team's broadcasts as the Brewers Radio Network) in September and October, WTMJ's FM sister station WKTI (94.5) originates the games in Milwaukee, with other stations in the Packers Radio Network making their own determinations about carriage of both games depending on whether they have a sister station to broadcast both games. WTMJ is simulcast on HD Radio over WKTI-HD2, in addition to the main AM signal's HD broadcast. Despite the NFL's Game Pass service nominally restricting WTMJ from streaming PRN coverage over the Internet, the station has streamed the team's games since the 2011 season, outside playoff games, though the streaming has been limited to desktop computers as of the 2015 NFL season due to both the new Game Pass package and TuneIn's premium service holding streaming rights for NFL play-by-play on mobile devices.

Its primary programming consists of broadcasts of Packer home and away games to a network of 56 stations in Wisconsin, the U.P., Iowa, North Dakota, and South Dakota, along with a two-hour pre-game show and three-hour postgame show which allows listeners to call, email, or text in a sports talk format about the finished game. Wayne Larrivee has been the play-by-play announcer since 1999, while former Packer center Larry McCarren has worked as the color commentator since 1995. Both Larrivee and McCarren contribute to the team's television programs, in addition to work with WTMJ's television sister station WTMJ-TV in Milwaukee and WGBA-TV in Green Bay, where McCarren was sports director from 2013 until 2015 when he began to focus exclusively on his Packers network duties.

Though its broadcasts began in 1929, WTMJ did not begin paying the Packers for broadcast rights until 1943; it paid the team $7500 to broadcast the season. In the early 1930s, there was no exclusive right given to broadcast games, and WHBY, then based in Green Bay, often sent its own announcers to call the game. From 1933 to 1936, three additional stations carried WTMJ's radio broadcasts of Packer games: WLBL in Stevens Point (a non-commercial station owned by the state commerce department decades before the creation of Wisconsin Public Radio), WTAQ in Green Bay and WKBH in La Crosse. WSAW in Wausau and WJMS in Ironwood, Michigan started carrying the feed in 1937.

Telegraph Herald

The Telegraph Herald, locally referred to as the TH, is a daily newspaper published in Dubuque, Iowa, for the population of Dubuque and surrounding areas in Iowa, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The newspaper is the result of a 1901 merger of the Dubuque Herald and the Dubuque Telegraph. A descendant of the Dubuque Visitor (founded in 1836), the Dubuque Herald's earliest editor was Dennis Mahony.The Telegraph was founded in 1870, and before merging with the Herald had absorbed eight local publications. John S. Murphy was the editor and publisher of the Telegraph at the time of its merger until his death in March 1902. He was a prominent Democratic leader, and editorialized at the time of the merger that "politically and economically the policy

of the Telegraph-Herald will be a continuation of that of the Telegraph."His son and successor as editor from 1902 to 1914, Richard Louis Murphy, was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1932. The paper is published by Woodward Communications, which is also based in Dubuque. The current editor of the paper is Amy Gilligan, and the current publisher is Steve Fisher.

U.S. Amateur Public Links

The U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship, often referred to as the Public Links or the Publinx, was a men's amateur golf tournament, one of 10 individual amateur championships organized by the United States Golf Association. The USGA typically called the event the U.S. Amateur Public Links, which it has registered as a service mark. The tournament was devised as a championship for golfers who played on public courses, as members of private clubs were barred from entry. In February 2013, the USGA announced that the event would be discontinued after its 2014 edition, and would be replaced by a new men's amateur four-ball championship.The first Public Links was held in 1922 at the Ottawa Park Course in Toledo, Ohio. The event grew over time, from 140 entries in 1922 to over 6,000 in 1998.

The Publinx was created to provide an outlet for national competition for public-course golfers because at that time, entry to the U.S. Amateur was restricted to members of clubs that were affiliated with the USGA or (presumably) other national governing bodies. However, in 1979, entry to the U.S. Amateur was opened to all amateurs, whether or not they were club members. When the USGA announced the demise of the Publinx, it specifically stated that "the APL [Amateur Public Links] and WAPL [Women's Amateur Public Links] championships no longer serve their original mission because of the widespread accessibility public-course golfers today enjoy in USGA championships."Eligibility was similar to that for the U.S. Amateur. Golfers must follow the USGA's guidelines for amateur status, which, in general, exclude anyone who has ever played or taught golf for money. The Public Links, like the U.S. Amateur, had no age limit. However, there were two key differences in the eligibility criteria for the Public Links:

Entries were accepted from golfers with a USGA men's handicap of 4.4 or lower, as opposed to 2.4 for the U.S. Amateur.

Entries were not accepted from players who have playing privileges at golf clubs not open to the general public, and such golfers were not allowed to compete if they received such privileges between their entry and the end of the main tournament.

Exceptions to above: The USGA did consider some players with privileges at non-public facilities to be "bona fide public course players," specifically those whose privileges were solely due to any of the following:

Their enrollment in a specific educational institution.

Their status as active or retired members of the military.

Their current or former employment by an entity other than a golf club.The Public Links was open to men and women, although very few women ever entered. In 2005, 15-year-old Michelle Wie became the first woman to advance to the match-play portion of the tournament. She was also the first woman to ever qualify for any USGA championship typically played by men.

Entrants qualified to play in the U.S. Amateur Public Links by playing one of many qualifying tournaments held at sites around the United States with players completing 36 holes of stroke play in one day. The 64 qualifiers played in the tournament proper which began with three rounds of stroke play to narrow the field to 16 players who then competed in a single-elimination match play tournament. Each match was 18 holes except the championship match which was 36 holes; before 2001, the final was an 18-hole match.)

The winner of the event earned an invitation to the following year's Masters Tournament, if he/she was still an amateur at the time of the Masters.

The 2005 edition, held in Lebanon, Ohio, drew an unusually large amount of media attention due to Michelle Wie's presence. She had stated on several occasions that she wished to one day play in the Masters, and this event was generally considered to be her best chance to qualify. Wie advanced to the match play rounds, losing in the quarterfinals to Clay Ogden, who went on to win the tournament.

The analogous event for women was the U.S. Women's Amateur Public Links, established in 1977 and also discontinued after 2014 and replaced by a women's four-ball tournament.Trevor Immelman became the first winner of the Public Links to win a Major Championship with his victory at the 2008 Masters Tournament. His playing partner in the final round, Brandt Snedeker, was also a past Public Links winner.

U.S. Women's Amateur Public Links

The U.S. Women's Amateur Public Links Championship, often referred to as the Public Links or the Publinx, was a women's amateur golf tournament, one of 10 individual amateur championships organized by the USGA and first played in 1977. The USGA officially called the event the U.S. Women's Amateur Public Links, which it has registered as a service mark. The tournament was devised as a championship for female amateurs who play on public courses, as members of private clubs were barred from entry. In February 2013, the USGA announced that both this event and its men's counterpart, the U.S. Amateur Public Links, would be discontinued after their 2014 editions, and would be replaced by new amateur four-ball championships for both men and women.While the U.S. Amateur Public Links was first held in 1922, the women's counterpart event was not held until 55 years later. Both the men's and women's Publinx had been created to provide outlets for national competition for public-course golfers, who before 1979 had been barred from entering either the U.S. Amateur or U.S. Women's Amateur because both events were restricted to members of clubs affiliated with the USGA or (presumably) other national governing bodies. When the USGA announced the demise of the men's and women's Publinx, it specifically stated that "the APL [Amateur Public Links] and WAPL [Women's Amateur Public Links] championships no longer serve their original mission because of the widespread accessibility public-course golfers today enjoy in USGA championships."The main tournament opened with two rounds of stroke play. The leading 64 players then qualified to compete in a match play competition. The matches were played over 18 holes. Before 2002, the final was also played over 18 holes. From 2002 to 2014, the final was played over 36 holes.

Eligibility is similar to that for the U.S. Women's Amateur. Golfers must follow the USGA's guidelines for amateur status. The USGA defines an "amateur golfer" as anyone who plays golf purely for the qualities of the game itself, "not as a profession and not for financial gain". The Public Links, like the U.S. Women's Amateur, had no age restrictions. However, there were two key differences in the eligibility criteria for the Public Links:

Entries were accepted from golfers with a USGA handicap index of 18.4 or lower, as opposed to 5.4 for the U.S. Women's Amateur.

Entries were not accepted from players who had playing privileges at golf clubs not open to the general public, and such golfers were not allowed to compete if they received such privileges between their entry and the end of the main tournament.

Exceptions to above: The USGA did consider some players with privileges at non-public facilities to be "bona fide public course players," specifically those whose privileges were solely due to any of the following:

Their enrollment in a specific educational institution.

Their status as active or retired members of the military.

Their current or former employment by an entity other than a golf club.Michelle Wie became the youngest champion in the history of USGA adult championships when she won the 2003 U.S. Women's Public Links championship at age 13, her final tournament victory as an amateur. Wie also holds the record as the youngest Publinx competitor; she played in 2000 as a 10-year-old.

WAPAL

Wings apart-like protein homolog is a protein that in humans is encoded by the WAPAL gene.

WAUN-FM

WAUN-FM (92.7 FM, "La Mas Grande") is a Regional Mexican formatted radio station licensed to Kewaunee, Wisconsin, that serves the Green Bay area. The station is owned by Magnum Broadcasting.

WAUN's main signal can be heard from Sturgeon Bay, where the station's main office is located, south to Manitowoc and west to the Green Bay metro area. WAUN also broadcasts over two translator stations, W245BS 96.9 FM in Green Bay and W255AQ 98.9 FM in Sturgeon Bay. Both translators are owned by Del Reynolds. The Green Bay translator formerly aired on 97.3 as W247AC but was pushed to 96.9 after WTAQ-FM signed on at 97.5.

WHBY

WHBY (1150 AM, "Newstalk 1150") is a News/Talk formatted radio station licensed to Kimberly, Wisconsin, that serves the Green Bay and Appleton-Oshkosh areas. The station is owned by Woodward Communications and features programming from CBS Radio, Premiere Radio, Compass Media Network and Westwood One. WHBY's studios and microwave transmitter are located on East College Avenue in Appleton. Its 6-antenna broadcast transmission array is located in the Town of Vinland, on Wisconsin Highway 76.

WKZG

WKZG (104.3 FM) is a radio station licensed to Seymour, Wisconsin and serving the Fox Cities and Northeast Wisconsin. Owned and operated by Woodward Communications, WKZG airs an adult hits format. WKZG's studios are located on College Avenue in Appleton, while its transmitter is located in Seymour.

WKZY

WKZY (92.9 FM) is an American radio station, licensed to Chilton, Wisconsin, and transmitting from the Lake Winnebago community of Stockbridge to provide a city-grade signal to both Oshkosh and the Fox Cities. The station is owned and operated by Woodward Communications, and has simulcasted the Top 40/CHR format of sister station WKSZ since February 15, 2016. WKZY's studios are located on College Avenue in Appleton.

WSCO

WSCO (95.3 FM & AM 1570 The Score) is a radio station broadcasting a Sports radio format. Licensed to Appleton, Wisconsin, the station serves the Appleton-Oshkosh area. The station is currently owned by Woodward Communications, Inc. and features local, state, and National Programming. WSCO is also heard on translator W237AA 95.3 FM (MHz) in Appleton. WSCO's studios are located on College Avenue in Appleton, while its AM transmitter is located in Menasha.

The station signed on in 1952 as WAPL. The call letters were changed to WVMS on October 4, 1978. On September 1, 1985, the station changed its call sign to WRJQ and to the current WSCO on January 31, 2002.

WZOR

WZOR (94.7 FM) is a commercial radio station serving the Green Bay, Fox Cities and lakeshore areas of Northeastern Wisconsin. The station is licensed to the Manitowoc County community of Mishicot, Wisconsin, and airs an active rock music format as "Razor 94-7." WZOR's studios are located on College Avenue in Appleton, while its transmitter is located near Denmark.

WZOS

WZOS (104.7 FM) is a radio station licensed to Berlin, Wisconsin, that serves the Fox Valley in Northeastern Wisconsin. Owned by Woodward Communications, Inc., the station broadcasts an active rock format, and has been a simulcast of WZOR since June 13, 2018.

Radio stations serving Green Bay and Northeastern Wisconsin
by FM frequency
by AM frequency
NOAA Weather Radio
frequency
by callsign
Radio stations in the AppletonOshkosh, Wisconsin market (Fox Cities)
By FM frequency
By AM frequency
By callsign
Defunct
Woodward Communications, Inc.
Publishing
Broadcasting

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