Vladimir Lyakhov

Vladimir Afanasyevich Lyakhov (Russian: Влади́мир Афана́сьевич Ля́хов; 20 July 1941 – 19 April 2018) was a Russian Soviet cosmonaut.

He was selected as cosmonaut on 5 May 1967, and retired on 7 September 1994. Lyakhov was the Commander on Soyuz 32, Soyuz T-9, and Soyuz TM-6, and spent 333 days, 7 hours, 47 minutes in space. He was married and had two children.

He was awarded:

Vladimir Lyakhov
1984 CPA 5522 (cropped - Vladimir Lyakhov)
Born
Vladimir Afanasyevich Lyakhov

20 July 1941
Died19 April 2018 (aged 76)
Astrakhan, Russia
OccupationPilot
AwardsHero of the Soviet Union
Space career
Cosmonaut
RankColonel, Soviet Air Force
Time in space
333d 07h 47m
SelectionAir Force Group 4
MissionsSoyuz 32, Soyuz T-9, Mir EP-3 (Soyuz TM-6/Soyuz TM-5)

External links

1969 European Athletics Championships – Men's discus throw

The men's discus throw at the 1969 European Athletics Championships was held in Athens, Greece, at Georgios Karaiskakis Stadium on 16 and 18 September 1969.

1971 European Athletics Championships – Men's discus throw

The men's discus throw at the 1971 European Athletics Championships was held in Helsinki, Finland, at Helsinki Olympic Stadium on 14 and 15 August 1971.

1983 in spaceflight

The following is an outline of 1983 in spaceflight.

2018 in Russia

Events in the year 2018 in Russia.

List of Salyut expeditions

This is a chronological list of expeditions to the Salyut space stations. Initially these expeditions were not numbered, however the crews of Salyut 6 and Salyut 7 were numbered EO-n, where n is sequentially increased with each expedition to that particular station. Taxi crews are excluded from this list (see List of human spaceflights to Salyut space stations for details). Salyut commanders are listed in italics. "Duration" refers to the crew and does not always correspond to "Flight up" or "Flight down". Missions which failed to reach or dock with the station are highlighted in red.

The Salyut programme was a series of Soviet space stations launched during the 1970s and 1980s. Six Salyut space stations were manned, whilst a number of other stations were not, either due to failures, or because they were prototypes and not designed to be manned. Manned flights as part of the Salyut programme ended in 1986, when Salyut was superseded by the Mir space station.

List of Salyut spacewalks

This is a list of spacewalks conducted from the Salyut space stations. Salyut was a Soviet programme which consisted of a number of early space stations, including the first space station to be launched, Salyut 1. Six of the space stations launched as part of the Salyut programme were manned, and spacewalks were made from two of these, Salyut 6 and Salyut 7. A total of sixteen spacewalks were made in the Salyut programme; three from Salyut 6 and thirteen from Salyut 7. Each involved two cosmonauts. Fifteen different cosmonauts performed the spacewalks, with several performing multiple EVAs. Leonid Kizim and Vladimir Solovyov each performed eight EVAs, the most of any cosmonauts in the programme.

All of the EVAs were conducted by cosmonauts who part of an Expedition crew, with the exception of one spacewalk by Visiting Expedition 4 cosmonauts Svetlana Savitskaya and Vladimir Dzhanibekov, on which Savitskaya became the first woman to perform an EVA. This is highlighted in light blue.

List of Soyuz missions

This is a list of crewed and uncrewed flights of Soyuz series spacecraft.

The Soyuz programme is an ongoing human spaceflight programme which was initiated by the Soviet Union in the early 1960s, originally part of a Moon landing project intended to put a Soviet cosmonaut on the Moon. It is the third Soviet human spaceflight programme after the Vostok and Voskhod programmes. Since the 1990s, as the successor state to the Soviet Union, Russia has continued and expanded the programme, which became part of a multinational collaboration to ensure a permanent human presence in low Earth orbit on the International Space Station (ISS). Since the retirement of the Space Shuttle in 2011, Soyuz spacecraft are the exclusive vessels ferrying astronauts to and from the ISS.

List of human spaceflights, 1981–1990

This is a detailed list of human spaceflights from 1981 to 1990, spanning the end of the Soviet Union's Salyut space station program, the beginning of Mir, and the start of the US Space Shuttle program.

Red indicates fatalities.

Green indicates suborbital flights (including flights that failed to attain intended orbit).

List of human spaceflights to Salyut space stations

This is a chronological list of human spaceflights to the Salyut space stations. Prior to Salyut 6, flights were referred to by the designation of the Soyuz spacecraft that transported the crew to and from the station. Flights to Salyut 6 and Salyut 7 were numbered either EO-n" for long-term expedition crews, or EP-n" for short-term visiting or taxi crews, where n was sequentially increased with each flight of that type to that particular station. Salyut commanders are listed in italics. "Duration" refers to the crew and does not always correspond to "Flight up" or "Flight down". Missions which failed to reach or dock with the station are listed in red. All cosmonauts are Soviet unless otherwise indicated.

The Salyut programme was a series of Soviet space stations launched during the 1970s and 1980s. Six Salyut space stations were manned, whilst a number of other stations were not, either due to failures, or because they were prototypes and not designed to be manned. Manned flights as part of the Salyut programme ended in 1986, when Salyut was superseded by Mir.

Lyakhov

Lyakhov or Liakhov (Russian or Ukrainian: Ляхов) is a Russian masculine surname, its feminine counterpart is Lyakhova or Liakhova. Notable people with the surname include:

Ivan Lyakhov (died c. 1800), Russian explorer

Olha Lyakhova (born 1992), Ukrainian middle-distance runner

Sergey Lyakhov (born 1968), Russian discus thrower

Vladimir Liakhov (1869–1919), Russian military commander

Vladimir Lyakhov (1941–2018), Russian cosmonaut

Yuliya Lyakhova (born 1977), Russian high jumper

Mir EP-3

Mir EP-3 was a week-long manned spaceflight to the Soviet space station Mir, during the long-duration expedition Mir EO-3. It was the sixth manned spaceflight to Mir, and was launched with the spacecraft Soyuz TM-6. This spacecraft also carried Valeri Polyakov, who would stay aboard Mir after the crew of EP-3 returned to Earth in Soyuz TM-5. The crew of EP-3, also known as the Soyuz TM-6 crew, consisted of Soviet cosmonaut Vladimir Lyakhov as commander, and the first Afghan to visit space, Abdul Ahad Mohmand.

Salyut 7

Salyut 7 (Russian: Салют-7; English: Salute 7) (a.k.a. DOS-6) was a space station in low Earth orbit from April 1982 to February 1991. It was first manned in May 1982 with two crew via Soyuz T-5, and last visited in June 1986, by Soyuz T-15. Various crew and modules were used over its lifetime, including 12 manned and 15 unmanned launches in total. Supporting spacecraft included the Soyuz T, Progress, and TKS spacecraft.It was part of the Soviet Salyut programme, and launched on 19 April 1982 on a Proton rocket from Site 200/40 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in the Soviet Union. Salyut 7 was part of the transition from "monolithic" to "modular" space stations, acting as a testbed for docking of additional modules and expanded station operations. It was the tenth space station of any kind launched. Salyut 7 was the last space station of the Salyut Program, which was replaced by Mir.

Soyuz 32

Soyuz 32 (Russian: Союз 32, Union 32) was a 1979 Soviet manned space flight to the Salyut 6 space station. It was the eighth mission to and seventh successful docking at the orbiting facility. The Soyuz 32 crew was the third long-duration crew to man the space station.

Cosmonauts Vladimir Lyakhov and Valery Ryumin spent 175 days in space, setting a new space endurance record. Because of the failure of a visiting crew to successfully dock and the resultant decision to send an unmanned Soyuz craft as a replacement return vehicle, the Soyuz 32 crew had no visitors in the Salyut 6 space station.

Soyuz 34

Soyuz 34 (Russian: Союз 34, Union 34) was a 1979 Soviet unmanned space flight to the Salyut 6 space station. It was sent to supply the resident crew a reliable return vehicle after the previous flight, Soyuz 33, suffered an engine failure.

Mission control decided to re-design the engine used on Soyuz craft as a result of the Soyuz 33 failure, and to return the Soyuz 32 craft which transported Vladimir Lyakhov and Valery Ryumin to the space station to earth unmanned as it had the same suspect engine as Soyuz 33. Soyuz 34 successfully returned the crew to earth 73 days after launching.

Soyuz 39

Soyuz 39 was a 1981 Soviet manned space flight to the Salyut 6 space station. It was the fifteenth expedition, and carried the eighth international crew to the orbiting facility. The crew visited Vladimir Kovalyonok and Viktor Savinykh, who had reached Salyut-6 ten days prior.

The flight carried Vladimir Dzhanibekov and Jügderdemidiin Gürragchaa into space. With this mission, Gürragchaa became the first Mongolian, and second Asian cosmonaut.

The Mongolian contribution for this mission had begun in 1967, when the president of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences Bazaryn Shirendev attended a conference of scientists from socialist countries in Moscow, where the Intercosmos project was announced. Dzhanibekov and Gürragchaa performed about thirty experiments during the course of the mission.

Soyuz T-8

Soyuz T-8 was a manned mission to the Salyut 7 space station in 1983. Shortly into the mission, the spacecraft failed to dock with the space station due to an incident involving an antenna being torn off the craft by the protective launch shroud. After a fuel-consuming attempt made in darkness for an optical rendezvous with Salyut 7 resulted in an abort in order to avoid collision, it was decided to de-orbit T-8 two days into the mission in order to ensure that the spacecraft had a sufficient amount of propellant for the de-orbit maneuver. After de-orbiting, landing of the craft occurred normally.

Soyuz T-9

Soyuz T-9 (Russian: Союз Т-9, Union T-9) was the 4th expedition to Salyut 7 following the failed docking of Soyuz T-8. Returned lab experiments to earth. The next mission, Soyuz T-10a, had failed to launch due to a fire.

Soyuz TM-5

Soyuz TM-5 was the fifth cosmonaut-carrying spacecraft to visit the Russian Space Station Mir. It was launched on June 7, 1988, carrying the Mir EP-2 mission's three-person crew. This week-long stay on Mir occurred during the third long-duration Mir expedition, Mir EO-3. The crew of EP-2 returned to Earth aboard Soyuz TM-4, while the TM-5 spacecraft remained docked to Mir, acting as the lifeboat for the long-duration crew. On September 7, 1988, the TM-5 spacecraft undocked from Mir, and landed Mir EP-3 mission's two-person visiting crew. The de-orbit procedures for Soyuz were revised after this flight, as multiple issues almost prevented the descent module's safe de-orbit and landing.

Soyuz TM-6

Soyuz TM-6 was the sixth manned spacecraft to visit the Soviet Space Station Mir. It was launched in August 1988, during the station's third long-duration expedition, Mir EO-3. The three-person crew that was launched consisted of Research Doctor Valeri Polyakov, who became part of the EO-3 crew, as well as the two crew members of the week-long mission Mir EP-3, which included the first ever Afghan cosmonaut, Abdul Ahad Mohmand.

On September 8, Soyuz TM-6 was undocked from Mir's Kvant port and redocked onto the Mir Base Block's port. It remained there until December, when it brought Titov and Manarov of the EO-3 crew back to Earth. It also landed French astronaut Jean-Loup Chrétien, ending his week-long spaceflight which started with Soyuz TM-7.

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